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Full text of "Annual report of the city of Somerville"

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CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



1888. 




BOSTON: 
CASHMAN, KEATING & CO., PRINTERS. 

1889. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1888. 



MAYOR. 

MARK F. BURXS. 

Residence, 61 Mt. Yernon Street; office, City Hall. 



ALDERMEN. 
Bernard W. Lawrexce, President. 

WARD ONE. 



Xathax H. Reed . 
George D. Wemyss 



Charles L. Xorth 
Timothy C. Davyer 



WARD TWO 



Florence Street. 
Austin Street. 



. High Street. 

. Somei-ville Avenue. 



JoHX F. Kenxard . 
Robert Duddy 



WARD three. 



. Howe Street. 
. Bond Street. 



WARD FOUR. 



Bernard W. Lawrence 
Edward H. Brad sh aw . 



. Holland Street. 
Central Street. 



CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Charles E. Oilman (deceased Feb. 22). 
George I. Yincent (elected Feb. 28). 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 

COMMON COUNCIL. 
George O. Peoctoe, President. 



WARD ONE. 



George M. Starbird 
Charles M. Hemenway 
Charles B. Sanborn 
Byron L. French . 

Patrick F. Deady 
John W. Macdonald 
Jeremiah J. Lyons 
Lyman H. Brown . 

Edward O'Brien . 
Ezra D. Souther . 
Martin L. King 
Alvano T. Nickers on 

George O. Proctor 
Albert W. Edmands 
Charles F. Bert well 
Joseph Cummings . 



ward two. 



WARD three. 



WARD four. 



Pearl Street. 
Perkins Street. 
Austin Street. 
Florence Street. 

Oak Street. 
High Street. 
Washington Street. 
Somerville Avenue. 



Lowell Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Cross Street. 
Broadway. 

Spring Street. 
Summer Street. 
Broadway. 
Broadway. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 
Charles S. Robertson. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES FOR 1888. 

Accounts. — Aldermen North, Duddy; Councilmen King, 
Edmands, Lyons. 

City Engineering. — Aldermen Reed, Xorth ; Councilmen 
Starbird, O'Brien, Nickerson. 

Claims. — His Honor the Mayor; Aldermen Wemyss ; the 
President of the Common Council; Councilmen Hemenway, 
Cummings. 



CITY GOYERX^IEXT AND OFFICERS FOE 1888. D 

FiXAXCE . — His Honor the Mayor ; Aldermen Wemyss, Brad- 
sliaw; the President of the Common Council; Councilmen Souther, 
Hemenwav, Deadv, Cumming-s. 

FiKE Depakt:mext. — Aldermen Lawrence, Kennard ; Council- 
men Macdonald, Bert well, Sanborn. 

Fuel axd Street Lights. — Aldermen Dwyer, Reed; Coun- 
cilmen King, French, Edmands. 

Highways. — Aldermen Reed, Bradshaw; Councilmen O'Brien, 
Starbird, Brown. 

Legislative Matters. — His Honor the Mayor; Alderman 
Bradshaw; the President of the Common Council; Councilmen 
Cummino;s, Deadv. ^ 

Okdixaxces. — Aldermen Wemyss, Lawrence; Councilmen 
Hemenway, Souther, Bertwell. 

Peixtixg. — Aldermen Kennard, Lawrence; Councilmen King, 
Sanborn, Edmands. 

Public Gkol'xds. — Aldermen Kennard, Reed; Councilmen 
Macdonald, Xickerson, French. 

Public Property. — Aldermen Duddy, Wemyss; Councilmen 
Starbird, Xickerson, Lyons. 

Soldiers' Relief. — Aldermen Reed, Xorth; Councilmen 
CBrien, Sanborn, Lyons. 

Water. — Aldermen Bradshaw, Dwyer; the President of the 
Common Council; Councilmen Souther, Brown. 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 
STAXDIXG committees. 

Electioxs. — Aldermen Lawrence, Xorth. 

ExROLLED Ordixaxces. — Aldermen Duddy, Dwyer. 

LiCEXSES. — Aldermen Lawrence, Duddy. 

Police. — His Honor the Mayor; Aldermen D^er, Wemyss. 

Sewers. — Aldermen Xorth, Lawi'ence, Kennard. 

State Aid. — Aldermen Bradshaw, Dwyer, Duddy, Xorth. 

special COM^^nXTEE. 

BuiLDiXG Permits. — Aldermen Reed, Lawrence. 



6 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elections and Returns. — Councilmen Deady, Macdonald, 
Bertwell. 

Enrolled Ordinances and Resolutions. — Councilmen 
Souther, French, Brown. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Mark F. Burns, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

George O. Proctor, President of the Common Council, ex 

officio. ' 

(Term, three years.) 
WARD ONE. 

S. Newton Cutler (elected 1885) . Pearl Street. 

Horace C.White, M. D. (elected 1886) . Arlington Street. 
Horace P.Hemenway, M. D. (elected 1887) Perkins Street. 

WARD TWO. 

Alphonso H. Caryill, M.D. (elected 1885) Bow Street. 
James F. Beard (elected 1886) . . Prospect Hill Av. 
Charles I. Shepard (elected 1887) . High Street. 

WARD three. 

XoRMAN W. Bingham (elected 1885) . School Street. 
QuiNCT E. DicKERMAN (clcctcd 1886) . Central Street. 
William P. Hill (elected 1887) . . Sycamore Street. 

WARD FOUR. 

Martin W. Carr (elected 1887) . . Craigie Street. 
Prof. Benjamin G. Brown (elected 1885) Professors' Row. 
Horace P. Makechnie, M. D. (elected 

1886) Elm Street. 

Secretary^ Joshua H. Davis . . . Myrtle Street. 
Superintendent of ScJiools, Joshua H. Dayis to May 1. 

Clarence E. Melenet from May 1. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1888. 

PRINCIPAL ASSESSORS. 

(Term, three years.) 

StillmaxH. LiBBY (elected 1886), Chair- 
man ....... Elm Street. 

George W. Hadlet (elected 1888) . Perkins Street. 

Bexjamix F. Thompsox (elected 1887) . Summit Avenue. 



ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

(Term, one year.) 

George W. Bartlett, Ward One . . Mt. Yemen Street, 

Dexter F. Bexxett, Ward Two . . Washington Street. 

Hiram D. Smith, Ward Three . . Cross Street. 

Samuel T. Richards, Ward Four '. . Summer Street. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

(Term, Physician, three years ; other members, two years.) 

Thomas M. Durell, M.D. (appointed 

1888), Chairman . . . Office, Police Building. 
J. Fraxk Wellixgtox (ap2:)ointed 

1887), . . . . . Yinal Avenue. 

Charles H. Craxe (appointed 1888), Webster Street. 

Clerh^ George I. Vixcext Office, City Hall. 
ins/?ec^or, William H. Brixe (to May 14), 40 Houghton Street. 

Caleb A. Page (from May 14), . Webster Avenue. 



COMMISSIONERS OF THE SINKING FUNDS. 

(Term, three years.) 

Hexrt F. Woods (elected 1888) .# • Sycamore Street. 

Christopher E. Rtmes (elected 1887 for 

unexpired term) .... Summer Street. 

JoHX F. XiCKERSox (elected 1887 for un- 
expired term) ..... Flint Street. 
Treasurer^ Aarox Sargext, Broadway. 



8 ANNUAL KEPORTS. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Mark F. Burns, Mayor, Chairman^ ex officio. 

(Term, four years.) 

Herbert E. Hill (elected 1886) . . Mt. Vernon Street. 
Charles G. Brett (elected 1885) . . Hall Street. 
Edward B. West (elected 1888 for unex- 
pired term) ..... Prescott Street. 
Daniel C. Stillson (elected 1888) . . Tennyson Street. 
Agent^ Charles C. Folsom, Office, Police Building, Bow Street. 
Secretary^ Frank W. Kaan, Office, Police Building, Bow Street. 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS. 

Charles E. Gilman, City Clerk (deceased Feb. 22). 
George I. Vincent, City Clerk (elected Feb. 28). 

(Term, three years.) 

Cromwell G. Rowell, Chairman (appointed 1888). 
Samuel G. A. Twycross (appointed 1886). 
Otis M. Currier (appointed 1887). 



SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 

(Term, one year.) 
J. Orlin Hatden, President . Hill Building, Union Square, 



Walter S. Barnes 
John B. Viall 
Adna C. Winning 
Richard Dowd 



Highland Avenue. 
Webster Street. 
Fremont Street. 
Charles Street. 



Clerk^ Frederic W. Stone. 

Superintendent of Water- Works^ Nathaniel Dennett. 

Office, Prospect Street, corner Somerville Avenue. 



CITY GOYERKMEXT AXD OFFICERS FOR 1888. 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

(Term, three years.) 

Chaeles S. Li:n'col:n' (elected 1888), President^ Laurel Street. 
Chaeles G. Pope (elected 1888) . . Summit Avenue. 
J. Hexrt Flitxee (elected 1886), Secre- 
tary ....... Day Street. 

Geoege a. Brfce (elected 1886) . . Highland Avenue. 
William E. Weld (elected 1887) . . Harvard Street. 
James E. Whitaker (elected 1887) . Sycamore Street. 

William H. Beixe (elected 1886) . . Highland Avenue. 
Saxfoed Haxscom, M.D. (ele ted 1887) . Webster Street. 
Cheistophee E. Rymes (elected 1888) . Summer Street. 
Librarian^ Haeeiet A. Adams. 



CITY CLERK AND CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Chaeles E. Gilmax (deceased Feb. 22). Office, City Hall. 
Geoege I. Yixcext (elected Feb. 28). 



CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 
JoHX F. Cole. Office, City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 
Jaieus Max^x. Office, City Hall. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Selwyx Z. Botvmax. Office, 23 Court Street, Boston, 



CITY AUDITOR. 
Douglas Feazae. Office, Citv Hall. 



10 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

CITY ENGINEER. 
Horace L. Eaton. Office, City Hall. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 
Frank G. Williams, Albion Street. Office, City Hall, 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LIGHTS. 
Thomas R. Roulstone. Office, City Hall. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE 

LINES. 

James R. Hopkins, Summit Avenue. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 
Melville C. Paekhuest, Police Station, Bow Street. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
James R. Hopkins. Office, Engine House, Highland Avenue, 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 
James R. Hopkins, Summit Avenue. 



INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR. 
Thomas Cunningham, Oak Street. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 
Thomas M. Dijeell, M. D., 14 Bow Street. 



CITY GOVEKXMEXT AXD OFFICERS FOE 18-^. 11 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS AND COMMITTEES. 
George I. Vixcext. Office, City Hall. 



ASSISTANT CLERK OF ASSESSORS AND COMMITTEES. 
William P. Mitchell. Office, City Hall. 



CONSTABLES. 

Jaiels Maxx'. Wm. H. Brixe (Houghton St.) 

Robert R. Perry. TTilliam D. Haydex^. 

Charles C. Folsom. Samuel R. Do^. 

Edward McGarr. Joseph J. Giles. 

Christopher C. Cayaxagh. George Cullis. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 
Dayid a. Saxborx. Charles D. Elliot. 



FIELD DRIVERS. 

Johx E. Fuller. Dexxis Kelly. 

JuDsox VT. Oliver. Charles S. Thrasher. 

Patrick Bexch. George VT. Beax. 

Hubert H. Miller, Charles L. Ellis. 

James F. Foley. 



POUND KEEPER. 
Charles A. Small. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 
Ammiel Colmax, 34 Marshall Street. 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK. 
Samuel T. Littlefield. 



12 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



WEIGHERS OF COAL. 

J. C. CoTJSiNS. D. W. Danforth. 



MEASURER OF GRAIN. 
John C. Craig. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Wm. a. Flaherty. P. H. Rafferty. Patrick TIafferty. 

Edward H. Marsh. Thomas J. Barker. Horace D. Runey. 

Alfred E. Mann. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 
Melville C. Parkhurst, Chief. 
Robert R. Perry, Captain. Samuel R. Dow, Sergeant. 



Edward McGarr, Sergeant. 
John E. Fuller. 
Albion L. Staples. 
JuDSON W. Oliver. 
George W. Bean. 
George L. Smith. 
Edward M. Carter. 
Patrick J. Bench. 
John F. Johnson. 
Eugene A. Carter. 
Edward E. Hamblen. 
James F. Foley. 
Charles L. Ellis. 



Chris'r C. Cavanagh, SergH. 

P. W. Skinner. 
Samuel A. Brown. 
John Hafford. 
Ivan Laighton. 
Myron H. Kinsley. 
George A. Bodge. 
Dennis Kelly. 
George H. Carle ton. 
Hubert H. Miller. 
Francis A. Perkins. 
Charles S. Thrasher. 
William H. Johnston. 



Charles E. Woodman. 

Melville C. Parkhurst, Lock-up Keeper. 



MEETINGS. 13 



MEETINGS. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 
Second and fourth Wednesday evenings of each month. 

COMMON COUNCIL. 

Thursday evenino-s following the second and fourth Wednesdays 

of each month. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
Last Monday evenmg of each month. 



MAYOR'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



IliT COJ^VENTION OF THE CiTY CoUlSrCIL, \ 

Jan. 2, 1888. / 

Resolved, That His Honor, the Mayor, be and is hereby requested to 
furnish the committee on printing with a copy of his Inaugural Address 
for publication. 

Kead twice and adopted. 

CHARLES E. GILMAN", City Clerk. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



OF 



HON. MARK F. BURNS. 

Delivered Jax. 2, 1888. 



Gextlemex or the City Council: — 

CoNTRAPvT to my own expectations, I have been called upon 
for the fourth time to prepare and deliver the customary address 
at the inauguration of the new City Government. While not 
expecting or desiring to be called to this important duty, still I 
am not unmindful of the great honor conferred, nor ungrateful 
for the kind expression of the confidence reposed in me by my 
fellow-citizens. I am ready to join with you in promising to 
repay them, in part, for their kindness by giving them twelve 
months of honest, faithful service. 

It should be remembered that an address of this kind is pre- 
pared, not for the purpose of entertaining those who may hapj^en 
to hear it read, but for the sole purpose of giving the information 
which should be in the possession of every member of the City 
Council before he undertakes to legislate for the city ; also, for 
the purpose of making such recommendations as may seem, 
under the circumstances, important. All financial statements 
should be absolutely correct. 

^ot only should the address furnish information for members 
of the City Council, but should, and it is supposed to, contain 
information interesting to all tax-payers and investors. It should 
be a ready reference, by means of which the financial condition 
of the city may be con-ectly and easily ascertained. For these 
reasons some of the tables contained in the inaugural address of 
last year are repeated. 



18 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



FINANCES. 

It appears by the forthcoming report of the Sinking Fund 
Commissioners that the sinking funds, Jan. 1, 1887, amounted 
to $584,052.41, to which was added during the year, from con- 
tributions from the city and interest on investments, the suna of 
$70,252.88, making the total amount of sinking funds now on 
hand $654,305.29. Of this amount all but $1,805.29, which is 
on deposit at the bank, is invested in Somerville City Bonds. 

The funded debt of the city remains the same as it was Jan. 
1, 1887, namely, $1,525,000. If from this amount the sinking 
funds now on hand are taken it leaves the net funded debt, Jan. 
1, 1888, $870,694.71. 

The unfunded liabilities are for temporary loans, $170,000, 
and this amount is equalled by uncollected taxes, assessments, 
and accounts due. 

The real estate in the city was valued last year at $25,219,900 ; 
the personal property, $2,251,900 ; total valuation, $27,471,800. 
The tax rate was $14.80 on each $1,000, and, together with 
8,862 polls assessed, brought $424,309.14, the amount of the 
tax levy. 

The following is the valuation, tax levy, and rate, each year, 
since 1876 : — 



Year. 


Yat.tjation. 


Tax Levy. 


Kate. 


1876 . 


. $26,573,400 . 


. $504,745.24 . , 


. $18.60 


1877 . 


. 25,479,400 . 


. 471,789.14 . 


. . 18.10 


1878 . . 


. 20,976,900 . 


. 409,497.10 . 


. . 19.00 


1879 . 


. 18,950,100 . . 


. 352,553.80 . . 


. 18.00 


1880 . 


. 20,458,100 . 


. 402,927.71 . 


. 19.10 


1881 . 


. . 22,569,100 . 


. 452,945.45 . 


. . 19.50 


1882 . 


. 23,162,200 . 


. 425,721.16 . 


. 17.«0 


1883 . 


. . 23,812,900 . 


. 411,645.43 . 


. 16.70 


1884 . 


. . 24,331,100 . 


. 418,750.26 . 


. . 16.60 


1885 . 


. 24,878,400 . 


. 428,605.44 . 


. . 16.60 


1886 . 


. . 26,003,200 . 


. 416,987.28 . 


. 15.40 


1887 . 


. . 27,471,800 . 


. .. 424,309.14 . 


. . 14.80 



The funded debt reached its largest amount in 1876, and rep- 
resented the amount borrowed for the following improvements, 
viz. : — 



MAXOE S IXAUGUEAL ADDRESS. 



19 



Public buildings, land, town debt, &c $502,354 

Public park 200,000 

Street improvements 292,500 

Sidewalks 50,000 

Sewers 227,000 

Water-works 335.000 



Total 



81,606,854 



Of this amount 810,000 was paid in 1878, 611,854 in 1879, 
and $60,000 in 1885, leaving the funded debt, $1,525,000, as 
before stated. 

Somerville has fulfilled the provisions of the law. which was 
enacted by the Legislature of 1875. That law obliged us to 
" establish a sinking fund and contribute thereto from year to 
year an amount raised annually by taxation sufficient, with its 
accumulations, to extinguish the debt at maturity," or in twenty 
years from that time, except the water debt, which must be 
paid in thiity years. The contributions to that sinking fund, 
and assessments on each $1,000 of the valuation necessary to 
meet it, have been as follows : — 



Year. 
1876 
1877 

1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
18S2 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 



Amount. 
$45,130.62 
48,828.58 
51,004.64 
53,061.76 
55.739.35 
58,498.64 
61,390.59 
64,479.01 
67.719.33 
71.305.66 
66,894.23 
70,252.88 



Rate per 

.-.1000 of 

Valuation. 

81.70 

1.92 

2.43 

2.80 

2.72 

2.59 

2.65 

2.70 

2.78 

2.87 

2.57 

2.56 



making the total amount contributed towards the final extin- 
guishment of the debt, as provided for by the Act of 1875, 
$714,305.29, and the average tax rate for that purpose, $2.52 
on a $1,000 valuation. It will be seen bv the foresroingr fimires 
that the requirements of the law regulating "3Iunicipal indebt- 
edness " have been rigidly complied with ; but the burden it has 
imposed upon us has been heavy, and the rate of taxation largely 
increased in excess of that required to provide for oilt ciuTent 
expenses, and pay for the permanent improvements which are 
constantly being made. In my opinion, it is not necessary or 



20 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

reasonable to ask that the debt be paid as rapidly as this, neither 
do I think it is in the interest of economy to do so. The reason 
why over $700,000 has been raised by taxation for this purpose, 
and the annual tax rate increased over $2.50 on the average dur- 
ing this time is because the law of 1875 required it. Considering 
the fact that the property of the citizens has been taxed to this 
extent during all these years to carry out the provisions of the 
law, and that the rate each year has been $2.50 higher than it 
would have been had we not been obliged to provide for the 
payment of the debt, it must be acknowledged that the debt has 
been a burden, and the property of the citizens has been taxed 
so high as to materially impair our prosperity ; and, furthermore, 
the city has been unable to make permanent improvements, 
which were very much desired, and in some cases absolutely 
necessary. The Legislature of 1887, recognizing these difficul- 
ties, passed a new law, giving Somerville certain privileges, 
among which are the following : It provides in the first place 
that it may apply its " existing sinking funds, consisting wholly 
of its own bonds, and any accumulation of interest thereon, 
toward the payment of the existing funded debt." Our funded 
debt to-day is $1,525,000. As we have in the sinking funds 
$654,305.29, if we apply this sum toward paying off the debt, we 
shall only owe $870,694.71, and instead of allowing everybody 
to think we owe $1,525,000, we can publish to the world, what 
is a fact, that the debt of Somerville is only $870,000. The 
same law provides that, after a portion of the debt is paid with 
the sinking funds now on hand, a new sinking fund shall be 
re-established, and contributions made thereto annually from the 
tax levy, which shall be sufficient, with its accumulations, to pay 
it in twenty years from the time when the existing bonds come 
due. Exactly the same course must be pursued with this new 
debt as was followed with the old. The only difference would 
be, the debt would be $870,000 to start with, instead of $1,571,- 
854, as it was when the fund was first established, and the time 
for its payment some years longer, requiring us to set aside for 
the purpose some $20,000 or $25,000 instead of $70,000, and 
making the tax rate $1.50 lower each year. Shall the property 
be taxed $2.50 on a $1,000 or only $1.00 on account of the city 
debt ? Understand, that I have always advocated the policy of 



mayor's inaugjjb,aj. addeess. 21 

papng as we go, and the reduction of ttie debt as fast as we are 
able ; but I am of the opinion that we are paying it faster than is 
necessary or wise, for reasons which were stated in the inaugural 
address of last year, and which are here repeated. As the debt 
was contracted for such inaj^rovements as will be more useful 
and A'aluable in future years than they are to-day, it seems just 
and proper for us to ask the tax-payers of the future to assist in 
paying for them. I believe it is right to distribute the debt 
among the years that receive the benefit. I know it may be said 
that each year brings its own burdens, and that the tax-payers 
of the future will have all they can do to provide for their own 
wants; but this might also be said of the j^resent. TVe are pro- 
viding for present wants, pajdng a debt contracted years ago, 
and making permanent improvements, which will become more 
valuable as the city grows older. This we have done for twelve 
years ; but to do so we have been obliged to impose upon the 
tax-payers a rate of taxation so oppressive as to materially im- 
pair our prosperity. It was not expected by the Legislature 
that cities and towns would clear themselves entirely from debt, 
for the law allows them to borrow money on funded debt ac- 
count to the amount of two and one-half per cent, of the valua- 
tion, so when a city's net debt is less than that amount it is 
allowed to increase its funded debt until it reaches that limit. 
Why should it be necessary to continue to pay each year so 
large an amount towards the debt, especially after the net debt 
falls below the amount we are allowed to owe ? It will be seen 
that if we fail to make any further contributions to the sinking 
funds we shall be able in 1895, when the debt is to be paid, to 
borrow, under the law, money enough to pay off the whole of it. 
In my opinion the laws limiting the rate of taxation and muni- 
cipal indebtedness are all the legislation which is necessary upon 
this subject, and cities and towns could be safely left with these 
safeguards to manage theu* own municipal debt in theu' own way. 
If it is necessary to clear cities entirely from debt, or reduce it 
to a lower amount, the Legislature could reduce the limit. This, 
I think, it should and would do, as it has once done abeady. 

It tends to a more economical administration of a city's 
affairs to keep its debt about up to the limit allowed by law. It 
would be impossible, as the history of Somer^dlle will show, to 



22 , ANNUAL REPORTS. 

get an extravagant scheme through the City Council if the entire 
cost of the same must be put into the tax levy of that year. The 
right to borrow increases the desire and invites extravagance. 
Members of any City Council will be more careful in their ex- 
penditures if every dollar used must be provided for in their own 
tax levy, and they themselves held responsible for the tax rate. 
The rate should not be higher in Somerville than in Boston, 
Cambridge, or any other city. It seems very important that the 
tax on our property should be reduced. I think this should be 
our policy. It is a policy which, if adopted and continued for a 
few years, will so increase the value of property that we shall be 
able to make all necessary improvements without increasing the 
burden of taxation. I would not be undei:stood as advising a 
parsimonious economy in the administration of the city's affairs, 
but would advise providing for the maintenance of the various 
departments in a decently liberal manner, and would not forget 
that our city is destined to become a very large and populous 
one, and we should, with wise forethought, look ahead and pro- 
vide for her future needs. 

We have not borrowed any money on funded debt account 
for twelve years, not because none was needed, but simply be- 
cause the law did not allow us to. In getting along without 
borrowing, we have been obliged to impose a burden which was 
hard to bear, as will be seen by reference to the table of tax rates. 
It is true, the people do not complain now ; but the reason they 
do not is not because the rate is low, but because it is lower than 
it has been. 

The tax rate should not be over one and four tenths per cent, 
of the valuation, or $14.00 on a thousand. The debt of Somer- 
ville is not large enough to give any one uneasiness. It should 
not be made a burden or allowed to interrupt our prosperity. It 
should be paid no faster than is required by law. The City 
Council can pay it as fast as it desires. We must by law pay a 
part of it each year. We can, as far as the law is concerned, 
pay the whole of it. The I^ational Congress, and the peoj^le of 
this whole country, are beginning to see the folly of raising more 
m^oney by taxation than is required for the support of the Gov- 
ernment, and for the reduction of the national debt faster than 
the law requires. You will be called upon to decide how much 



mayor's i:n^afgfeal address. 23 

money shall be raised this year on account of the city debt. My 
recommendation is, that only so much be raised as will fulfil the 
conditions of the law of 1887, and that the provisions of that 
law be carried out by applying to the debt the existing sinking 
funds. If this is done, it will be proper, in niy opinion, to provide 
for all expenses of the city, except for the extension of the 
water-works, in the annual tax levy. 

If this recommendation does not appeal to your judgment, 
and you conclude to raise $70,000 for the debt, as usual, I recom- 
mend that the amount which will be required for new school 
houses, almshouse, hose house, and such permanent improvements 
as may be absolutely necessary, be raised by issuing bonds of the 
city, payable in twenty years, and not by immediate taxation, for 
I am firmly convinced that the tax rate should be further reduced. 
This cannot be done by increasing the valuation put upon the 
property by the assessors, for they will, as the law requii-es, assess 
it for what they consider its real value, regardless of consequences 
to the tax rate. That this plan may be followed will be seen 
from the following statement : The net funded debt of the city, 
exclusive of the water debt, is $615,000. By referring to the 
Public Statutes, Chapter 29, and the Acts and Resolves of 1885, 
Chapter 312, it will be seen that when the net municipal debt 
of a city falls below two and one-half per cent, of the average 
valuation for the three preceding years, it may increase the same 
until it reaches said limit. As the average valuation for the past 
three years is $26,000,000, and two and one-half per cent, of this 
amount is $650,000, we can, under the law, this year realize 
$35,000 from the sale of bonds, and also an amount equal to 
whatever you see fit to place in the sinking funds from the tax 
levy of 1888. In other words, it will be legal to borrow $35,000 
in addition to the amount appropriated for sinking funds, if 
you desire to. To my mind, the objection to this plan is that 
improvements may be made and schemes put through which 
ought to be postponed until the city can better afford it, or never 
done at all. I am firmly convinced that the first-mentioned 
course is far preferable ; it is safer and more economical, and I 
sincerely hope it will be adopted. 



24 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

STREET LIGHTS. 

There have been located during the past year seventy electric 
lights in the streets. It will cost to use these seventy lights this 
year, at the present price, $9,450. By examining the annual 
reports, it will be seen that the amount to be expended for elec- 
tric lights is more than has ever been used in maintaining the 
entire system of street lighting, or as much as it would cost to 
maintain five hundred additional gas lights. It will need for 
this department this year, with the lights that are now in use, an 
appropriation of $17,000. 

Realizing that the electric lights are furnished by a local com- 
pany, that many of the stockholders are influential citizens, as 
well as personal friends, that it seems to be the desire of the 
people that the streets should be lighted in this way, and that 
local pride and ambition can be satisfied in no other, still duty 
obliges me to again caution the City Council not to go too fast 
in the matter of electric lights. It would seem that the city, as 
well as the company, ought to be satisfied for the present with 
the number already located. 

Thus far the lights have not been entirely satisfactory, owing, 
it is supposed, to a lack of power to run the necessary machinery. 
This defect will soon be remedied, and, no doubt, the service 
will be satisfactory in every particular. 

In regard to placing electric light, telegraph, and telephone 
poles in the streets, recent events would seem to show the 
importance of the views expressed in the inaugural address of 
last year, to which you are respectfully referred. It is true that 
the telephone poles in Medford and Linwood Streets are un- 
usually large, but smaller ones may be objectionable to some. 
Property owners should have the right to object, and their wishes 
should be respected, if possible. The Board of Aldermen is not 
obliged to give away a valuable franchise to please any corpora- 
tion or body of stockholders. It should not, in my opinion, locate 
an electric light or horse railroad, unless the city can afford it, 
and the public convenience and necessity require it. 

FIRE departme:n^t. 

There has been no increase of the fire apparatus, or of the 
manual force in this department, during the past year. Twenty- 



mayor's i:N^AirGUKAL ADDRESS. 25 

six new fire hydrants have been put in, making 46 added in two 
years, and the total number in the city 367. The city of Boston 
has placed new hydrants on the main pipe which passes through 
this city, at our request, as has also the city of Cambridge on 
that portion of our territory which it supplies with water. They 
are post hydrants, and of the same size of those used by our 
city. This is a great improvement, and one which will be 
appreciated by every one interested in the department. The 
city is now so well supplied with hydrants that a special appro- 
priation is no longer necessary. 

The working force should be increased by the addition of a 
new hose company, to be located in the vicinity of the Middlesex 
Bleachery, of course requiring a new hose house. 

The question of making this addition has been discussed in the 
City Council for two years ; but the improvement has not yet 
been made, and for this delay the Mayor is undoubtedly respon- 
sible, as a majority of the members of the City Council seemed 
to favor it, but even the Mayor recognizes its importance and 
would recommend the addition. It is hoped that it can be done 
this year. 

I would also recommend that the hose carriages now in use be 
exchanged for light wagons. Our heavy carriages, with reels, 
painted in high colors, with brass and silver-plated trimmings, 
are the relics of the volunteer system. The volunteer was proud 
of his machine and liked to have it shine. He loved to work on 
it and show it to his friends, but that time has gone by. The 
paid department does not join military processions or make 
displays in any way. The paid fireman is hired to work, and he 
wants handy and serviceable tools to work with. A wagon, 
with the necessary amount of hose and other fire implements, 
can be hauled as easily with one horse as the carriages now in 
use can be with two. It is evident that if the change is made 
there will be quite a saving in labor and money. 

POLICE. 

The police force was increased in 1887 by the addition of 
four men. It consists at present of one chief, one captain, three 
sergeants, and twenty-five patrolmen. This seems to be as large 



26 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

a force as the city can afford at the present time, and it is in 
complete working order as far as discipline is concerned, and 
although excellent as far as it goes, it must be admitted that 
it is small. 

^ It would be a great addition to the strength and efficiency of 
this department if it could have a signal service, such as is in use 
in Worcester, Lynn, or Boston. The first cost of such a service 
would be less than five thousand dollars, and the cost of main- 
tenance very little. I am satisfied that it would be worth as 
much to the force as the addition of five men. It is hoped the 
present City Council will carefully investigate this subject, ex- 
amine the different systems, and establish some one of them 
in our city. 

WATER-WORKS. 

For several years the cost of maintaining the water- works and 
the extension of the water mains have been charged to the same 
account. On account of the rapid increase of population, or the 
erection of new dwelling-houses, requiring an extension of the 
pipes, and the fact that the cement pipes which were first laid 
are worn out and often break, the expenses of this department 
have rapidly increased. The cost of maintenance in 1878 was 
$6,376; in 1887 it was $25,400. The amount received from the 
city of Boston on account of the water contract has increased 
from $11,584.89 in 1878 to $42,650.57 in 1887; over $20,000 of 
this increase is owing to the new contract procured in 1886, and 
the balance to the increase of the number of those who use the 
water. 

The cement pipe now in use must soon be replaced with iron 
pipe. Some streets have already been relaid, and others should 
be this year. For this purpose, and the ordinary cost of main- 
tenance, all the money which can be spared from the tax levy 
will be required, without extending the mains. At the same 
time, the works must be extended to meet the improvements 
which are constantly being made, and to satisfy the just de- 
mands of those who require the water. 

The only way that occurs to me to supply the demands of 
this department is to borrow the money which will be required 
for the extension of the water- works on funded debt account. 



MAYOe's rS'AUGUEAL ADDRESS. 27 

We have legislative authority to borrow $55,000, in addition to 
that which has been borrowed heretofore, and I see no good 
reason for not takino- advantao-e of it. The same argument is 
good now that controlled the authorities when the works were 
first put in. There is no good reason why all of the cost of con- 
structing new works should be paid in one year. The cost of 
maintaining this dej^artment, as well as all other city de2:»art- 
ments, must all be paid this year; but we can distribute the 
amount required for permanent improvements, which will be as 
valuable to us in the future as they are to-day, over a large 
number of years, thereby giving us the benefits of these im- 
provements immediately, without assuming too heavy a burden. 
I therefore recommend that the amount required for the exten- 
sion of the water- works be borrowed on funded debt account. 

SCHOOLS. 

There are 108 public schools in the city, which are under the 
charge of 123 teachers. At present there are 375 scholars in 
the High School, 2,480 in the grammar schools, and 2,065 in the 
primary schools. The average daily attendance has been 4,878, 
an increase over last year of just 200. The amount expended in 
1887 was for 

School teachers' salaries $84,016 11 

School contingent 15,9^^0 00 

School-house incidentals 13,633 93 

School fuel 5,475 00 

School-house — Ward 3 7,273 15 

School-house — Ward 4 7,566 20 

Total 8133,864 39 

or $26 for each of the 5,000 pupils who have attended the 
schools at some time dm^inor the vear. 

To support the schools it required over one third of the entire 
tax levy, or $4.87 of the tax rate. It must be admitted that 
Somerv'ille is very liberal in its expenditure for public schools. 

The two school-houses, one on Lowell Street, in Ward Three, 
and one on Cherry Street, in Ward Four, which were begun in 
1886, were completed in 1887. They are substantial and com- 
modious buildings, well finished and furnished, and are thought, 



28 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

by some, to be the best buildings for school purposes in the city. 
The cost of each, including land, was about $15,000. Another 
similar building is very much needed in Ward Four. 

^o part of the city, however, is so poorly supplied with school 
buildings as the Prospect Hill District, which takes in the whole 
of Ward Two and a part of Ward One. This district, which 
contains two-fifths of all the school children in the city, has but 
one large grammar school building and one grammar master, 
while in the other districts there are four. In this district there 
are two thousand scholars, and one thousand or less in each of 
the others. In my opinion, when a locality contains one thou- 
sand pupils it should be made into a school district, the schools 
organized and placed in charge of a grammar master. I am not 
satisfied that justice is being done to the school children of Ward 
Two. The district should be divide(J, and another grammar 
school building of twelve rooms erected immediately. It seems 
to me we shall make a great mistake if we build another small 
school-house in this ward, as contemplated by the City Council of 
1887. For further information upon the subject you are referred 
to the forthcoming report of the School Committee ; and let 
me here remark that it is the duty of all members of the City 
Council to read carefully all reports of committees and boards, 
and note their recommendations. 

To provide for the rapidly-increasing school population, we 
must soon make an addition to the High School Building. There 
are now 375 pupils attending the school, and by another year we 
shall be unable to accommodate those who mil apply for admis- 
sion. All of these buildings should be erected as soon as possible. 
It certainly is the duty of the City Council to provide suitable 
accommodations for the school children. They must be educated, 
let the cost be what it will. Our School Board is composed of 
interested and educated men, — men who are not only capable 
of organizing the schools and preparing a course of study, but 
who realize the importance of education. Physicians, ministers, 
lawyers, teachers, and business men find a place upon the School 
Committee, and, in conducting its affairs, it is natural that their 
experience in their own business should affect their actions. The 
minister or elocutionist is apt to feel that too little time is spent 
in teaching the pupil how to read properly; the architect or 



mayor's i:n^atigfeal address. 29 

engineer thinks more attention should be paid to drawing ; the 
man who is proud, or ashamed, of his own hand-writing, would 
have more time spent in teaching penmanship, and the one who 
loves music thinks we cannot spend too much time or money in 
teaching the pupils how to sing ; the merchant says more book- 
keeping; the mathematician says more arithmetic; the historian, 
more geography and history ; while the member who has spent 
his whole life in study, and has graduated from high institutions 
of learning, insists upon thoroughness in all studies, believes in 
percentage, and would have perfect system, and every pupil 
ranked according to his scholarship. He believes that in the 
public schools, which are carried on at pubhc expense, the 
foundation for a thorough education should be laid, although he 
knows, or ought to know, that nearly all of the scholars must 
leave school as soon as they are large enough to work, and begin 
to earn their own living. It seems clear to me that our aim 
should be to prepare every child for the duties of citizenship. 
They should pursue those studies that will best enable them to 
support themselves and those who will be dependent upon them. 
There are some, whose parents are wealthy, who sj^end more 
time in procuring an education. How far the authorities are 
justified in carrying this latter class, at the public expense, is 
a question that is now agitating the minds of thinking men. 
Another great question is whether or not the most useful 
branches, taking everything into consideration, are taught in 
the public schools. It may seem to some that the time has 
come when the School Committee should consider the question, 
whether or not it is our duty to teach children how to work as 
well as how to read. Should not the gnls be taught to sew, and 
the boys to use the axe and the hammer ? These questions will 
be considered by the committee during the year ; they are care- 
ful, able men who are interested in the schools and in the city. 
No doubt they mil secure the best results from theii' expendi- 
tures. In my opinion, as every parent is obliged to contribute 
his share toward the support of pubhc schools, no branches 
should be taught except those which will be of substantial 
benefit to every single scholar. Property should not be taxed 
to educate in the higher branches the children of wealthy 
people. 



30 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

POOR. 

The appropriation for the support of the poor was $14,000 in 
1887, and less than $12,000 was expended. The Board of Over- 
seers are certainly entitled to the gratitude of the people for the 
careful and business-like manner in which their duties are per- 
formed. Great credit is also due to the agent of the board. 
Your attention is again called to the necessity of an almshouse. 
We are now supporting at least thirty paupers who are fit sub- 
jects for an almshouse. Some of these are now boarded in pri- 
vate families, some in state institutions, and some in almshouses 
which belong to other cities or towns. It is our duty to know 
absolutely that the unfortunate poor are made comfortable. 
They must be properly clothed, have enough to eat, and be kept 
warm ; they must be cared for when sick, and provided for 
when well. The only way to be sure of this is to keep them in 
our own house and have our own responsible agents look out for 
them. The recommendation of last year is renewed, — that an 
almshouse be built on the land on Broadway, owned by the city 
and known as the City Farm. 

HIGHWAYS, SIDEWALKS, A:N^D SEWERS. 

Last year $38,000 was expended on the highways. With this 
amount 7 1-10 miles of street have been graded, and 8,228 feet 
of edgestone set. Over $22,000 was paid for labor. 

Laying so much track by the Horse Railway Company caused 
the committee to grade some streets that otherwise would not 
have needed repairs for some time to come, and by reason of this 
increased expense they were obliged to neglect some which 
required attention. It is hoped that whoever has charge of this 
department this year will spend the appropriation in putting 
some of our old streets in good condition. In our anxiety to 
secure something new let us not neglect that which we already 
have. 

The sidewalk appropriation was $3,500, and the usual amount 
was laid. 

Five thousand eight hundred and ninety-three and five-tenths 
feet, or one and one-tenth miles of sewers have been built during 
the past year, making the length of the system of public sewers 



mayor's IJiTAirGFRAL ADDRESS. 31 

in the city forty and five-tenths miles. The entire cost of new 
construction the past year was $8,711.86. Of this amount, 
$6,226.92 has been assessed on abutters, and $2,444.94 assumed 
by the city. The cost of the whole system up to the present 
time is nearly $750,000. 

CITY HALL A]S"D PUBLIC GROUXDS. 

In 1887, $6,720 was expended in grading and building walks 
on Central Hill. Xo doubt the residents in that vicinity, as well 
as all other citizens, are gratified with the result. The hill 
should be made more attractive, and can be by using a small 
amount of money. It should be grassed over, walks laid out, 
and shade trees planted to complete the improvement. 

It is hoped that this City Council will also feel like completing 
the improvements on the City Hall. It should be done, and we 
are able to do it. You are respectfully requested to read what 
is said upon this subject in the inaugural address of 1886. 

Gentlemex op the City Couxcil : — 

I have now spoken to you at some length on the financial con- 
dition of the city and its requirements, making some recommen- 
dations in connection therewith which seem to, me to be very 
important, as they bear directly on the great question of taxa- 
tion. I have also briefly stated to you some suggestions which 
occurred to me as necessary in connection with the various 
departments. It will be your privilege, if you think them of 
sufiicient importance, to consider them as well as to investigate 
recommendations that those who elected you will be likely to 
make. In deciding these questions we shall not need the aid of 
the lobby-member, the politician, nor those who are financially 
interested in the particular matter which happens to be under 
discussion ; but without their advice, after due deliberation and 
careful investigation, decide upon that course which will best 
advance the material interest of the city. It is more than likely 
that we shall not always be able to satisfy the demands or meet 
the expectations of our constituents, but this we can do : We 
can apply ourselves to the business in hand, and exercise our 
best judgment in deciding questions that affect the welfare of 



32 AN^XUAL REPORTS. 

the city. Remember that it is easier to spend a dollar than to 
save a cent. The man who points out the way to save a small 
sum is more useful than the one who shows how a large amount 
may be expended. The citizen who can ad\dse how better re- 
sults may be obtained, or how work may be more economically 
done, renders more valuable assistance than the one who always 
studies how the city's funds may be disposed of. 

The valuable public servant is the one who takes the public 
business home to himself, considers himself personally responsi- 
ble for every part of it, manages it exactly as though it was his 
pwn, and regards eveiy tax bill and every assessment bill which 
he causes to be distributed as a demand for the payment of a 
just and honest debt. It is our business to know that it is a just 
and an honest one. We may feel at times that we shall not 
receive credit for the constant effort and application necessary 
to fulfil all of our obligations ; but it is the only way in which a 
man can satisfy himself. 

And now, gentlemen, I shall be ready at all times to co-oper- 
ate with you in conducting the business of yoiu* departments, 
and you will allow me to ex]3ect to receive your assistance in 
conducting the affairs of mine. My experience teaches me that 
it is necessary for us all to work together, if we would meet the 
expectations of those who have selected us for these important 
positions. They evidently believe us to be honest, earnest, and 
capable. Let the records show at the end of the year that their 
confidence has not been misplaced. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 23, 1889. 
Referred to committee on finance, and sent down for concurrence. 

GEO. I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Jan. 23, 1889. 
Referred to committee on finance in concurrence. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



In Committee on Finance, Feb. 8, 1889. 
To the City Council of Somerville : — The committee on finance, to 
which was referred the annual report of the treasurer and collector of taxes 
for the year 1888, reports that the treasurer's books have been examined 
by this committee, and compared with the books of the auditor, also with 
the statements received from the several committees, boards, and officers of 
the city. 

We have also verified the amount of cash on hand by actual count, and 
by the reports from the officers of the banks of deposit, and have discovered 
no errors. 

The committee found that the books and accounts of the treasurer were 
kept in a neat and business-like manner. We, therefore, recommend that 
the report be accepted and printed in the annual reports for 1888. 

CHARLES G. POPE, 
GEORGE D. WEMYSS, 
GEORGE A. KIMBALL, 
ALBERT W. EDMANDS, 
EDWIN A. WILCOX, 
L. ROGER WENTWORTH, 
WM. E. PULSIFER, 
WM. A. HUNNEWELL, 



> Committee. 



In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 13, 1889. 
Accepted and referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the 
annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Treasukeb's Office, Jan. 19, 1889. 
To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council of the City of Somerville. 

Geisttlemej?^, — The undersigned presents herewith the seven- 
teenth annual report of the financial condition of the city, and a 
statement showing in detail the receipts and disbursements of the 
several departments for the year ending Dec. 31, 1888. 

The value of the property of the city, Dec. 31st, 1887, was 
$1,265,281.05, and the accessions thereto during the year were as 
follows : — 

Land on Concord Square $4,903.50 

Water-Works extension • . . . . 19,338.89 

The lot of land on Bond Street, valued at $2,500.00, having 
been sold during the year, leaves the value of the public property 
Dec. 31, 1888, as per Table A, $1,287,023.44. 

The funded debt of the city Dec. 31, 1888, as per Table B of 
the last annual report, was $1,525,000.00. 

Acting under the provisions of Ordinance Xo. 5, the Com- 
missioners of the Sinking Funds on March 23, 1888, delivered 
to the city the entire amount of funds held by them for the 
payment of the debt at its maturity, consisting of bonds of 
the city, amounting to $652,500.00 and $1,812.66 in cash; in all, 
$654,312.66. 

There was appropriated and put into the tax 
levy the sum of $35,187.34, making the total 
amount applied to the reduction of the funded 
debt $689,500 00 



Leaving the net funded debt . . . $835,500 00 



36 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The only increase of the funded debt during the year was 
for the extension of the Water- Works ; for which purpose the 
following bonds, bearing interest at four per cent., were issued : — 

Water Loan Bonds, Nos. 278 to 290, $1,000 

each, payable annually 1889 to 1901, $13,000 
Water Loan Bonds, Nos. 291 to 302, $1,000 

each, payable annually, 1907 to 1918, 12,000 

$25,000 00 

making the net funded debt Dec. 31, 1888, as will 



more fully appear in Table B . . . . $860,500 00 

City Loan Bonds, Nos. 439 to 461 at 5 per cent int. 23,000 00 

'^ " " Nos.467 to 507 at 4 per cent int. 41,000 00 



Amounting to $64,000 00 

became due during the year, and to provide for the amount 
which the city was authorized to renew, the following new 
bonds, bearing interest at the rate of four per cent, were issued : — 
City Loan Bonds, ISlos. 887 to 909, payable July 1, 

1894 23,000 00 

City Loan Bonds, IN'os. 910 to 913, payable July 1, 

1897 4,000 00 



Amounting to $27,000 00 

To provide for the payment of the State and county taxes, 
the reduction of the funded debt, and the expenses of the city 
for the year 1888, the assessors' warrant was received for the tax 
levy assessed upon the polls and estates of the inhabitants as 
follows, viz. : — 

Real estate, valuation . . . : . $26,488,200 00 

Personal property, valuation .... 2,277,200 00 



Total valuation $28,765,400 00 

At a rate of $14.00 on $1,000 valuation 

Amounting to 402,715 60 

2,108 property polls. 
7,263 single polls. 



9,371 polls at $2 each ... . . 18,742 00 

2 polls (women) at $0.50 each ... 1 00 



Total amount of tax levy . . . $421,458 60 



EEPOKT OF TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



37 



Received from the Commissioners of the Sinking 

Funds for the reduction of the funded debt . 654,312 66 

Keceived from the city of Boston for return on 

water contract on 1887 account . . . 3,188 30 

Received from the city of Boston for return on 

water contract on 1888 account . . . 47,224 27 

Received from all other sources . ... 74,253 94 

making the total amount of resources for the year 

ending Dec. 31, 1888 ... . $r,200,437 77 



The appropriations, credits, disbursements, and balances of the 
various accounts were as follows : — 



Accounts. Appropriations. 

City Hall Improvement : — 

Appropriation .... $3,000 00 

Expended 

Unexpended balance 

Fire Department : — 

Appropriation . . . . 27,000 00 
Keceived for old materials 

Expenditures 

Unexpended balance 

Health Department : — 

Appropriation . . . . 4,500 00 
Received for permits, licenses, etc. , 
Expenditures ..... 
Expended in excess of appropria- 
tion, etc 

Highways : — 

Appropriation .... 44,000 00 

Keceived for labor and materials . 
Expenditures ..... 
Unexpended balance ... 

Hose House in Ward Four : — 

Appropriation .... 10,000 00 

Expended . . . . . 
Balance to be expended in 1889 . 



Additional Expenditures 
Credits. and Balances. 



$2,953 95 
46 05 



$100 33 



226 00 



2,957 73 



26,743 88 
356 45 



5,024 21 
298 21 



46,606 05 
351 68 



2,513 40 
7,486 60 



,38 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Accounts. Appropriations. Additional Expenditures 

Credits. and Balances. 

Indigent Soldiers and Sailors : — 

Appropriation .... $500 00 

Keceived of State of Massachusetts, $508 50 

Expenditures $1,015 00 

Expended in excess of appropria- 
tion ...... 6 50 

Interest : — 

Appropriation . . . . 30,000 00 
Keceived interest, corporation, and 

bank taxes, etc. . . . . 19,441 37 

Expended 48,527 50 

Unexpended balance . . . 913 87 

Miscellaneous : — 

Appropriation . . $4,000 00 

Transferred to "School- 
house Incidentals "ac- 
count .... 1,700 00 



2,300 00 



Received for sale of land, costs, 

licenses, etc. . . 4,625 66 

Expenditures ..... 6,880 98 

Unexpended balance ... 44 68 

Police : — 

Appropriation . $30,000 00 
Transferred from "Po- 
lice Signal System" 
account . . . 825 94 

30,825 94 



Received for court fees, fines, etc. . 3,210 89 

Expenditures 33,598 30 

Unexpended balance ... 438 53 

Police Signal System: — 

! Appropriation . . $5,000 00 

Transferred to Police ac- 

i count . . . . 825 94 

4,174 06 

Expended 4,174 06 

Police Station Incidentals : — 

Appropriation .... 2,000 00 

Transferred from — 

" School House, Ward Three " ac- 
count 349 07 

" Schoolhouse, Ward Four" ac- 
count ...... 204 45 

Received for rent .... 568 00 



REPORT OY TREASURER AlfD COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



39 



Accounts. 



Appropriations. 



Police Station Incidentals — Continued 
Expenditures .... 
Unexpended balance 

Public Library: — 
Appropriation 
Balance from 1887 . 
Eeceived for dog licenses, fines 

etc 

Expenditures .... 
Expended in excess of appropria 

tion, etc 

Public Grounds: — 
Appropriation 
Expenditures . 

Expended in excess of appropria 
tion ..... 

Printing and Stationery: — 
Appropriation 

Eeceived for advertising, etc. . 
Expenditures .... 
Expended in excess of appropria 
tion 

Keduction of Funded Debt : — 
Appropriation ... 

Received from the Commissioners 

of the Sinking Funds . 
Applied to the reduction of the 

funded debt 

Salaries : — 

Appropriation 

Expended .... 

Unexpended balance 

School Contingent : — 
Appropriation 
Eeceived for tuition of non-resident 

pupils ..... 
Expenditures .... 
Expended in excess of appropria 

tion, etc 

School Fuel: — 
Appropriation 

Expended .... 
Expended in excess of appropria- 
tion ...... 



$3,000 00 



6,000 00 



Additional 
Ciedia. 


Expenditures 
and Balances. 




$2,799 66 
321 86 


$1,012 17 




2,718 02 


6,743 13 




12 94 




6,146 66 




146 66 



3,000 00 



15 80 



3,673 75 
657 95 



35,187 34 





654,312 


66 

689,500 00 


24,150 00 




23,145 61 
1,004 39 


17,000 00 






85 38 




17,851 60 
766 22 


6,500 00 




7,121 24 
621 24 



40 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Accounts. Appropriations. Additional Expenditures 

Credits. and Balances. 

School-house Incidentals: — 

Appropriation . $10,000 00 

Transferred from Miscel- 
laneous account . . 1,700 00 

Watering Streets account, 1,000 00 

$12,700 00 

Received for old materials, etc. . 11 81 

Expenditures 13,993 75 

Expended in excess of appropria- 
tion . 1,281 94 

School Teachers' Salaries: — 

Appropriation .... 40,000 00 
Received from " City of Boston 
Water Rates" .... 
Received unpaid salaries 
Expended ..... 
Unexpended balance 

School-house in Ward Two : — 

Unexpended balance from 1887 
ExjDended for land. Concord Sq. . 
Expended in excess of appropria- 
tion . . . . 

School-house in Ward Three: — 

Unexpended balance from 

1887 .... $395 11 

Transferred to Police 

Station Incidentals ac- \ 

count .... 349 07 * 

46 04 

Expended ... 46 04 

School-house in Ward Four : — 
Unexpended balance from 

1887 .... $250 48 
Transferred to Police 

Station Incidentals ac- 

coimt . . . . 204 45 

46 03 



$50,412 57 




$7 50 






85,700 66 




4,719 41 


4,177 55 






4,903 50 




725 95 



Expended ..... 46 03 

Sewers : — 

Appropriation .... 9,500 00 

Received for permits, etc. . . 243 87 

Expenditures 10,401 06 

Expended in excess of appropria- 
tion 657 19 



jropriations. 


Additional Expenditares 
Credits. and Balances. 


S4,500 00 






$3,708 04 




791 96 


16,000 00 






$53 00 




15,953 13 




99 87 



EEPOET OF TEEASTTEEE AXD COLEECTOE OE TAXES. 41 

Accounts. 

Sidewalks : — 

Appropriation 

Expended .... 

Unexpended balance 

Street Lights : — 

Appropriation 

Received for lamp-posts, etc. . 
Expenditures .... 
Unexpended balance 

Support of Poor : — 

Appropriation .... 14,000 00 

Eeceived for support of paupers . $2,293 07 

Expenditures $13,373 98 

Unexpended balance . . . 2,919 09 

Watering Streets : — ^ 

Appropriation . . 83,500 00 

Transferred to School- 
house Incidentals ac- 
count .... 1,000 00 

$2,500 00 

Eeceived from abutters . , . 5,710 46 

Expenditures 8.103 94 

Unexpended balance ... 106 52 

Water Maintenance : — 

« Appropriation .... 19,000 00 

Eeceived for labor, materials, etc. . 641 24 

Expenditures 15,570 20 

Unexpended balance ... 4,071 04 

Water- Works Extension : — 

Appropriation by borrowing on 
Funded Debt account . . 25^000 

Expenditures 19,. 338 89 

Balance to be expended in 1889, 5,661 11 

County of Middlesex, County Tax: — 

Appropriation .... 16,906 92 

Expended 16,906 92 

State of Massachusetts, State Tax : — 

Appropriation .... 30,127 50 

Expended 30,127 50 



42 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Accounts. Appropriations. Expenditures 

and Balances. 

Overlay and Abatement : — 

Appropriation .... 3,086 84 

Abatements on taxes. . . 10,958 31 
Abatements in excess of appro- 
priation 7,871 47 



$421,458 60 $778,979 17 $1,213,484 04 
Accounts overdrawn . . . 13,046 27 
Credits from various sources . 778,979 17 



$1,213,484 04 $1,213,484 04 



Appropriations : — 

As per tax levy . ' . . $421,458 60 

Received of the Commissioners 

of the Sinking Funds . . 654,312 66 
Received of City of ijoston for 

return on water rates . . 50,412 57 
Received from various sources . 74,253 94 

Expenditures .... $1,197,298 64 

Excess and deficiency account : — 
Unexpended bal- 
ances . . $16,185 40 
Expended in excess 

of appropriations, 13,046 27 
Unexpended balance . . 3,139 13 



Total .... $1,200,437 77 $1,200,437 77 



The assets of the city available for the payment of its unfunded 
liabilities are as follows : — 

Taxes . . . . . . . . $151,226 08 

Real-estate liens . . . . . . . 335 58 

State of Massachusetts, State aid . . . 3,802 00 

State of Massachusetts, indigent soldiers and sailors 495 50 

Sidewalk assessments ...... 2,093 17 

Sewer assessments ...... 6,908 87 

Water service assessments . . * . . . 1,746 02 

Cash 20,101 85 



Total amount of available assets . . $186,709 07 



EEPOKT OF TEEASUEEE AXD COLLECTOE OF TAXES. 



43 



The liabilities are : — 

Temporaiy loans 
Hose house in TTard Four 
Overplus on tax sales 
Sundry persons . 
Water-works extension 



Total amount of unfunded liabilities 
Excess of available assets over unfunded liabilities 



$170,000 00 

7,486 60 

102 13 

320 10 

5,661 11 

$183,569 94 
3,139 13 

$186,709 07 



The financial condition of the city, exclusive of its pubUc 
property, is as follows : — 



Funded debt, city loan ..... 

Funded debt, water loan ..... 

Total funded debt ..... 
Excess of available assets over unfunded liabilities 

Leaving a net indebtedness, Dec. 31, 1888, of 

Total cash receipts for the year, including a bal- 
ance of $3,136.53 from the year 1887 . 
Total cash disbui'sements ..... 

Leaving in the treasury the sum of . 



$597,000 00 
8263,500 00 

$860,500 00 
3,139 13 

$857,360 87 



1,614,212 28 
1,594,110 43 

$20,101 85 



A detailed statement of the public property, funded debt, and 
receipts and disbursements of the various accounts will appear 
in the appendix. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHX F. COLE, 

Treasurer. 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S 

REPORT. 



TABLE A. 

PUBLIC PEOPERTY, DEC. 31,1888. 

Central Hill land (12 acres, 27,920 feet) . . $100,000 00 

City Hall 10,000 00 

Furniture .... 3,000 00 



13,000 00 

Public Library .... 8,500 00 
Public Library building . . 28,338 45 
Steam fire-engine bouse . . $10,000 00 
Furniture . . . . 500 00 
Steam fire-engine and appara- 
tus 4,000 00 

Steam fire-engine, bose carriage, 

and apparatus . . . 2,000 00 

16,500 00 



High Scliool-liouse . . . $40,000,00 

Furniture .... 3,500 00 

Pbilosopbical apparatus . . 500 00 



Prescott Scbool-house, land (21,444 

feet) and building . . |40,000 00 
Furniture .... 2,000 00 



Luther Y. Bell School-house, land 

(23,396 feet) and building $40,000 00 
Furniture .... 3,000 00 



44,000 00 



42,000 00 



43,000 00 



Amount carried forward . . . $295,338 45 



APPEXDIX TO TREASUPwEPt AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 45 



Amount hr ought forvxj/rd^ 
Forster School-liouse, land (27,499 
feet) and building 
Furniture .... 


137,922 24 
1,500 00 


8295,338 45 
39,422 24 

26,000 00 
33,000 00 

15,487 10 

20,600 00 

8,300 00 

8,300 00 

8,300 00 

2,600 00 

2,600 00 


Morse School-liouse, land (29,109 
feet) and building 
Furniture .... 


125,000 00 
^ 1,000 00 


Highland Schooi-liouse,land (23,260 
feet) and building 
Furniture .... 


$32,000 00 
1,000 00 


Lincoln School-bouse, land (17,662 
feet) and building 
Furniture . . 


$14,742 17 
744 93 


Prospect Hill School-house, land 

(25,313 feet) and building 

Furniture .... 


$20,000 00 
600 00 


Jackson School-house, land (11,212 
feet) and building 
Furniture .... 


$8,000 00 
300 00 


Bennett School-house, land (20,560 
feet) and building 
Furniture .... 


$8,000 00 
300 00 


Webster School-house, land (11,050 
feet) and building 
Furniture .... 


88,000 00 
300 00 


Union School-house, land (9,360 
feet) and building 
Furniture .... 


$2,500 00 
100 00 


Harvard School, land (9,810 feet) 
and building 
Furniture . . 


$2,500 00 
100 00 






Amount carried forward 


$459,947 79 



46 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward^ .... $459,947 79 

Edgerly School-house, land (26,428 

feet) and buildmg . . $25,000 00 
Furniture . . . . 500 00 

25,500 00 



Edgerly School-house, addition . $17,000 00 
Furniture .... 600 00 



Brastow School-house, land (10,019 

feet) and building . . 6,000 00 

Furniture .... 250 00 



Franklin School-house, land (33,017 

feet) and building . . $14,000 00 
Furniture 300 00 



Beach Street School-house, land 

(6,000 feet) and building . $4,500 00 
Furniture .... 250 00 



Spring Hill School-house, land 

(4,991 feet) and building . $1,600 00 
Furniture . . . . 100 00 



Davis School-house, Tufts Street, 
land (29,584 feet) and 

building . . . . $17,606 22 

Furniture ... . - . 726 99 



Cummings School-house, School 
Street, land (11,300 feet) 
and building . . . $14,643 21 
Furniture .... 714 16 



Bingham School-house, Lowell 
Street, land (21,017 feet) 
and building . . . $14,553 56 
Furniture .... 551 33 



17,600 00 



6,250 00 



14,300 00 



4,750 00 



1,700 00 



18,333 21 



15,357 37 



— 15,104 89 

Amount carried forward . $578,843 26 



APPENDIX TO TREASUEEE AXD COLLECTOe's EEPOET. 47 



Amount brought forvjard 

Burns School-house, Cherry Street, 
land (16,080 feet) and 
building . . . . $14,662 40 
Furniture .... 587 12 

City farm, land (10 acres, 12,523 

feet) 

Cedar Street School-house . . $700 00 

Furniture .... 100 00 

City stables and dwelling-houses . . . . 
Equipments for highway repairs .... 
Watering-carts and sheds . .... 

No. 1 Hose-house, land (4,312 

feet) and building . . 82,300 00 
Furniture .... 400 00 

John E. Wool hose-carriage 

and apparatus . . . 2,000 00 

No. 2 House-house, land (5,400 

feet) and building . . 87,500 00 
Furniture .... 300 00 

Winter Hill hose-carriage and 

apparatus .... 2,000 00 

Xo. 3 Hose-house, land (5,226 

feet) and building . . 89,000 00 

Furniture .... 300 00 

George H. Foster hose-car- 
riage and apparatus . . 2,000 00 

R. A. Yinal hook-and-ladder 

truck and apparatus . . 3,400 00 

Prescott hook-and-ladder truck 

and apparatus . . . 100 00 



. 8578,843 26 



15,249 52 

30,000 00 

800 00 

7,000 00 

3,000 00 

2,300 00 



4,700 00 



9,800 00 



14,800 00 



Amount carried forward^ . 



$666,492 78 



48 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Ainount brought forward 

1^0. 4 Hose-house, land (9,100 

feet) and building . . $11,000 00 
Furniture . . . . 400 00 
George O. Brastow hose-car- 
riage and a23paratus . . $2,000 00 
Relief hose-carriage . . 600 00 

Fire-alarm telegraph ...... 

Police-station, land (15,232 feet) 

and building (Bow Street) . $40,000 00 
Furniture .... 3,000 00 

Prospect Street, land (7,918 feet) and building 

Public Park (cost 1212,993.20) . 

Joy Street, land (2,960 feet) 

Walnut Hill, land (10,890 feet) . 

Elm Street, land (18,000 feet) . 

Holland Street (5 acres, 6,806 feet) 

Somerville Avenue (39,456 feet) 

Gravel-land in Waltham (about 35 acres) . 

Gravel-land in Wakefield (about li acres) . 

Gravel-land in Winchester (about 2 acres) . 

Somerville water- works (cost 1361,947.65) . 

Oliver Street, land (63,069 feet) 

Whipple Street, land, lots :N'os. 30 and 31 (15,240 

feet) 

Concord Square (about 24,517 feet) 

Total value of j)ublic property 



$666,492 78 



14,000 00 
15,800 00 



43,000 00 

7,000 00 

125,000 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

3,600 00 

12,000 00 

5,000 00 

15,000 00 

5,000 00 

500 00 

360,338 89 

7,500 00 

388 27 
4,903 50 

$1,287,023 44 



APPEXDIX TO TEEASUEEE AXD COLLECTOP's EEPOPT. 49 

TABLE B. 
FUXDED DEBT. DEC. 31, 1888. 





' 




Rate per 




Denomi- 




Date. 


Loan. 


Xumber of Bonds. 


ctnt. of 
Interest. 


When cUie. 


nation. 


i Amount. 


1881. 








1S89. 






Jan. 1. 


Water. 


57 to 65 


5 


Jan. 1. 


1,000 


89,000 


1888. 














July 1. 


li 


278 


4 


July 1. 


1,U00 


1,000 


1S60. 














Oct. 1. 


(( 


46 to 54 


5 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


9,000 


1884. 














Oct. 1. 


City. 


5u8 to 575 


4 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


68,000 


1888. 








1890. 






.July 1. 


Water. 


279 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 


1880. 














Oct. 1. 


(( 


00 


5 


Oct. 1. 


9,000 


9,000 


1884. 














Oct. 1. 


City. 


576 to 646 


4 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


71,000 


1888. 








1S91. 






July 1. 


Water. 


280 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 


1884. 














Oct. 1. 


City. 


647 to 720 


4 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


'74,000 


1881. 








1S92. 






Jan. 1. 


Water. 


66 to 76 


5 


Jan. 1. 


1,000 


ii,ooo 


1888. 














JuJyl. 


(( 


281 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 


1881. 














Oct. 1. 


(( 


78 to 88 


5 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


11,000 


1884. 














Oct. 1. 


City. 


721 to 798 


4 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


78,000 


1885. 








189.3. 






Julyl. 


a 


856 to 880 


* 


July 1. 


1,000 


25,000 


1888. 














July 1. 


Water. 


282 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 


188.5. 














Oct. 1. 


(( 


89 to 99 


5 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


11,000 


1884. 














Oct. 1. 


City. 


799 to 852 


4 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


54,000 


1888. 








1S94. 






Julv 1. 


Water. 


283 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1.000 


.July 1. 


City. 


887 to 909 


4 


Jul> 1. 


1,000 


23,000 


1881. 














Oct. 1. 


Water. 
Amount 


100 to 111 
carried forv:ard 


5 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


12.000 




$471 000 




i 




-^/^t 1 -L • \J\J\J 



50 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE B — Continued. 



Date. 


Loan. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought forward 








$471,000 


1888. 




1896. 






July 1. 


Water. 


284 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 


1876. 














Oct. 1. 


City. 


190 to 194 


5 


Oct. 1. 


5,000 


25,000 


Oct. 1. 


.( 


195 to 334 


5 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


140,000 


1883. 














July 1. 


Water. 


112 to 124 


5 


July 1. 


1,000 


13,000 


1876. 








1896. 






July 1. 


Sewer. 


lto7 


5 


July 1. 


5,000 


35,000 


1882. 














July 1. 


Water. 


125 to 136 


5 


July 1. 


1,000 


12,000 


July 1. 


u 


137 


5 


July 1. 


500 


500 


1888. 














July 1. 


u 


285 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 


1882. 








1897. 






July 1. 


(( 


138 to 151 


5 


July 1. 


1,000 


14,000 


1888. 














July 1. 


li 


286 • 


4 


July 1. 
1897. 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1. 


City. 


910 to 913 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


4,000 


1882. 








1898. 






July 1. 


Water. 


152 to 166 


5 


July 1. 


1,000 


15,000 


18S8. 














July 1. 


u 


287 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 


1882. 








1899. 






July 1. 
July 1. 


ii 


167 to 181 

182 


5 
5 


July 1. 
July 1. 


1,000 
500 


15,000 
500 


1888. 














July 1. 


u 


288 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 


1882. 








1900. 






July 1. 


(( 


183 to 194 


5 


July 1. 


1,000 


12,000 


1882. 














July 1. 


u 


195 


5 


July 1. 


500 


500 


1888. 














July 1. 


( ( 


289 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 


1884. 














Oct. 1. 


ii 


200 to 202 


4 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


3,000 


1888. 








1901. 






July 1. 


u 


290 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 


1884. 














Oct. 1. 


(( 


203 to 212 


4 


Oct. 1. 


1,000 


10,000 


1885. 














July 1. 


Amoiint 


214 to 219 
carried forward 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


6,000 




$783,500 











APPENDIX TO TEEASITKEE AXD COLLECTOe's EEPOET. 51 



TABLE B — Concluded. 



Date. 


Loan. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


"Wlien due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought foricard 








$783,500 


1885. 




1902. 






July 1. 


Water. 


220 to 226 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


7.000 


1886. 














July 1. 




229 to 238 


4 


July 1. 
1903. 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1. 




239 to 2.56 


4 


July 1. 
1904. 


1,000 


18,000 


July 1. 




257 to 266 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


10. 00 J 


1876. 








1906. 






July 1. 




30 and 31 


5^2 


July 1. 


5,000 


10,000 


1886. 








1907. 






July 1. 




267 to 276 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


10,000 


1888. 














July 1. 




291 


4 


July 1. 
1908. 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1. 




292 


4 


July 1. 
1909. 


1,000 


1.000 


July 1. 




293 


4 


July 1. 
1910. 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1. 




294 


4 


July 1. 
1911. 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1. 




295 


4 


July 1. 
1912. 


1,000 


1.000 


July 1. 




296 


4 


July 1. 
1913. 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1. 




297 


4 


July 1. 
1914. 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1. 




298 


4 


July L 


1,000 


1,000 


• 








191.5. 






Jaly 1. 




299 


4 


July 1. 
1916. 


1,000 


1.000 


July 1. 




300 


4 


July 1. 
1917. 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1. 




301 


4 


July 1. 
1918. 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1. 



Total 


302 
Funded Debt . 


4 


July 1. 


1,000 


1,000 




$860,500 













52 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE C. 



STATEMENT OE ACCOUNTS, SHOWING APPKOPRIA- 
TIONS, EXPENDITURES, ETC., TO DEC. 31, 1888. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



Credit. 



Taxes, amount assessed for current expenses 
Property and debt balance 



Debit. 



City Hall Improvement 

Fire Department 

Health Department 

Highways 

Hose House in Ward Four 

Indigent soldiers and sailors 

Interest 

Miscellaneous 

Police .... 

Police signal system 

Police station incidentals 

Public Library 

Public grounds 

Printing and stationery 

Reduction of funded debt 

Renewals of funded debt 

Salaries 

School contingent 

School fuel . 

School-house incidentals 

School teachers' salaries 

Sewers ... 

Sidewalks 



Am omit carried forward 



$3,000 00 

27,000 00 

4,500 00 

44,000 CO 

10,000 CO 

500 00 

30,000 00 

4,000 00 

30,000 00 

5,000 00 

2,000 00 

3,000 00 

6,000 00 

3,000 00 

35,187 34 

27,000 00 

24,150 00 

17,000 00 

6,500 00 

10,000 00 

40,000 00 

9,500 00 

4,500 00 

1345,837 34 



$371,337 34 
52,000 00 

$423,337 34 



APPENDIX TO TREASUREE AXD COLLECTOe's EEPORT. 



53 



Amount brought for'wai 
Street lights 
Support of poor . 
Watering streets 
Water maintenance ' . 
Water- works extension 



d 



1345,837 34 
16,000 00 
14,000 00 
3,500 00 
19,000 00 
25,000 00 



§423,337 34 



CASH. 



Credit. 



County of Middlesex 

City of Boston 

City hall improvements 

Funded debt 

Fire Department . 

Highways 

Health Department 

Hose-house Ward Four 

Interest 

Indigent soldiers and sailors 

Miscellaneous 

Police .... 

Police signal system 

Police station incidentals 

Public Library 

Public grounds 

Printing and stationery 

Salaries 

School contiii?gent 

School fuel . 

School-house incidentals 

School teachers' salaries 

School-house in Ward Two 

School-house in Ward Three 

School-house in Ward Four 

Sewers . . . . 

Sidewalks . . . . 



16,906 92 

6 50 

2,953 95 

716,500 00 

26,743 88 

46,606 05 
5,024 21 
2,513 40 

48,242 50 
1,015 00 
6,880 98 

33,598 30 
4,174 06 
2,799 66 
6,743 13 
6,146 66 
3,673 75 

23,145 61 

17,851 60 
7,121 24 

13,993 75 

85,700 66 

4,903 50 

46 04 

46 03 

19,132 43 
7,399 78 



Amount carried forward . 11,109,869 59 



64 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought for wen 


^d . 


11,109,869 59 


Street lights 




15,953 13 


Support of poor . 




13,373 98 


Sundry persons . 


-. 


195 00 


Watering streets . 




8,103 94 


State aid 




3,985 00 


State of Massachusetts 




30,127 50 


Temporary loans 




370,000 00 


Water services 




7,593 20 


Water maintenance 




15,570 20 


Water-works extension 




19,338 89 




tl 591 110 IS 






Balance to debit in account, 1889 


20,101 85 




$1,614,212 28 


Debt 


T. 


Balance .... 


13,136 53 ^ 


City of Boston water rates . 


50,419 07 


Funded debt 


52,000 00 


Fire Department 


100 33 


Health Department 


226 00 


Highways .... 


2,957 73 


Highway betterment assessments 


50 00 


Interest . . . . . 


19,438 99 


Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 


2 00 


Miscellaneous ... 


4,594 26 


Police .... 


3,210 89 


Police Station incidentals 


568 00 ^^ 


Public Library 


2,718 02 '^ 


Printing and stationery 


15 80 


Real estate liens 


39 89 


State aid .... 


42 00 


Sidewalk assessments . 


4,164 91 


Sewer assessments 


6,261 37 


Sewers . . . 


243 87 


State of Massachusetts, Stat 


e aid 


3,611 00 



Amounts carried forward 



1153,800 66 11,614,212 28 



APPEXDIX TO TPtEASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



00 



Amounts brought for vicird 
State of Massachusetts, Indigent 

Soldiers and Sailors 
School-house incidentals 
School teachers' salaries 
Street lights 
. Support of poor . 
Temporary loans 
Taxes 

Reduction of funded debt 
School contingent 
Watering streets . 
Water services 
Water maintenance. 
Water service assessments 



^153,800 66 81,614,212 28 

426 00 

11 81 

7 50 

63 00 

2,293 07 

370,000 00 

419,661 59 

654,312 66 

85 38 

5,710 46 

481 34 

291 15 

7,077 66 
$1,614,212 28 



COUXTY OF 3IIDDLESEX. 

Credit. 
Taxes, amount assessed 

Debit. 
Cash, paid county tax 

CITY OF BOSTOX WATEPt RATES. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of city of Boston 
return on water rates : — 

1887, 50 per cent, on 86,376.59 

1888, 50 per cent, on 894,461.55 



§16,906 92 
$16,906 92 



$3,188 30 
47,230 77 



50,419 07 



Debit. 

Cash, paid city of Boston, j^ropor- 
tion of amount of Tvater 
rates refunded . 
School teachers' salaries, 
transferred 



$6 50 
50,412 57 



850,419 07 



56 



ANNUAL KE PORTS. 



CITY HALL IMPROVEMENTS. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed . 

Debit. 

Cash, paid F. C. Fuller, carpentry 
Walburg & Woehrn, fresco- 
ing 

Miscellaneous account steam 
fitting .... 

Excess and deficiency, balance to 
credit of account 



$2,619 


62 


250 


00 


84 


33 


$2,953 


95 


46 


05 



13,000 00 



3,000* 00 



EXCESS AND DEFICIENCY. 

Credit. 

City Hall improvement, credit bal- 
ance of account . . $46 05 

Fire Department, credit balance 

of account .... 356 45 

Highways, credit balance of 

account .... 351 68 

Interest, credit balance of account 913. 87 

Miscellaneous, credit balance of 

account . . . . 44 68 

Police, credit balance of account . 438 53 

Police Station incidentals, credit 

balance of account . . 321 86 

Salaries, credit balance of account 1,004 39 

School teachers' salaries, credit 

balance of account . . 4,719 41 

Sidewalks, . • . . . . 791 96 

Street lights .... 99 87 

Support of poor .... 2,919 09 

Amount carried forward . 112,007 84 



APPEXDIX TO TKEASUREE AST) COLLECTOKS EEPOET. 0< 

Amount hrought fory:ard . $12,007 84 
Watering streets . . . . 106 52 

Water mainteftance . . . 4,071 04 



Debit. 

Health Department, debit balance 
of account .... 

Indigent soldiers and sailors, debit 
balance of account 

Overlay and Abatement debit 
balance of account 

Public Library, debit balance of 
account .... 

Public Grounds, debit balance of 
account . . . 

Printing and Stationery, deVjit bal- 
ance of account 

School Contingent, debit balance 
of account .... 

School Fuel, debit balance of ac- 
count ..... 

School-house incidentals, debit bal- 
ance of account 

School-house in Ward Two, debit 
balance of account 

Sewers, debit balance of account 



Balance to credit of account, 1889 



616,185 40 



$298 


21 


« 


6 


50 




7,871 


47 




12 


94 




146 


66 




657 


95 




766 


22 




621 


24 




1,281 


94 




725 
657 


95 
19 


- 


§13,046 
3,139 


27 
13 


§16,185 40 







FUNDED DEBT. 

Ceedit. ~~ 

Balance from 1887 . . . $1,525,000 00 

Cash, received for sale of City 

Loan Bonds, Xos. 887 to 909 $23,000 00 



Amounts carried forward . §23,000 00 §1,525,000 00 



58 , ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . 123,000 00 11,525,000 00 
City Loan Bonds, Nos. 910 to 

913 4,000 00* 

Water Loan Bonds, N"os. 278 

to 302 25,000 000 52,000 00 



,577,000 00 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Commissioners of the Sinking Funds : — 
City Loan Bonds 1556,000 
Water Loan Bonds 96,500 $652,500 00 
Sundry persons 
City Loan Bonds, IN'os. 439 to 

461 23,000 00 

City Loan Bonds, Xos. 467 to 

507 41,000 00 

Balance to debit in account, 1889 860,500 00 



1,577,000 00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed . . .* $27,000 00 
Cash,received of Lorenzo W. Dow, 

manure .... |56 00 

E. I. Braddock & Co., old 

copper, etc., ... 44 33 100 33 









127,100 33 




Debit. 






Cash, paid James R. Hopk 


ins, chief 






engineer 


. 


11,200 00 




N^athaniel C. Barker, 


assistant 






engineer 


. 


300 00 




Steamer engineer . 


. 


1,080 00 




Steamer firemen . 


. . 


900 00 




Seven drivers 


• 


6,300 00 





Amounts carried forward , 19,780 00 |27,100 33 



APPEJfDIX TO TEEASTJRER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 59 

Araounts brought forward . 

Wm. A. Perry, substitute driver . 

E. T. Herron, substitute driver 

Edwin F. Trefren, " " 

Clarence F. Cook, special service 

Edward Backus, special sei'^dce . 

TTilliam J. Blaisdell, special ser- 
vice ..... 

George S. Harris, S2:)ecial service 

Frank E. Hersey, special ser™e 

William C. Pierce, special service 

Henry J. Turner, special sei-vice 

Perlin K. Wood, special service 

Steamer Engine Company . 

John E. Wool Hose " 

Winter Hill " " . 

George H. Foster Hose Company 

George O. Brastow " " 

R. A. Yinal Hook & Ladder 
Company .... 

City of Boston, water for hydrants 

Cit}^ of Boston, water for houses 

Seward Dodge, blacksmithing 

Everett E, Onley, blacksmithing 

Timothy O'Brien, horseshoeing . 

Charles Maguii-e, horseshoeing . 

Charles W. Ingalls, " 

Wm. H. Richardson, " 

E. Teel & Co., repamng apparatus 

E. Teel & Co., hose wagon 
Daniel H. Crocker, repairing ap- 
paratus . . . . . 13 00 

Edward Kendall & Sons, repair- 
ing apparatus .... 6 20 

F. H. Flagg, repairing apparatus 3 50 
Union Square Carriage Co., rep air- 
ing apparatus . . . . 13 50 



89,780 


00 827,100 33 


246 


77 


35 


00 


174 


78 


3 


00 


85 


50 


3 


00 


3 


00 


36 


87 


15 


50 


3 


00 


3 


00 


786 


00 


691 


00 


691 


00 


683 


09 


691 


00 


1,356 


00 


1,848 


00 


105 


00 


84 


22 


2 


00 


72 


70 


54 


55 


37 


80 


38 


50 


214 


65 


440 


00 



Amounts carried foricard . . 818,221 13 827,100 33 



60 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts hrought forward . |1 

Wm. H. Bonner, repairs 

Harry Hnnt, repairs . 

J. E. Bond, repairing blinds 

E. Spalding, harness work . 

D. J. Bennett, " " 
Joseph Cogan, " " 
Charles E. Berry, harness work 
L. A. Hastings, " " 
C. A. Legallee, plumbing 
H. W. Covell & Co., plumbing 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
William B. Holmes, " 
Charles A. Holmes, " 

E. H. Buxton, repairing wagon 
S. J. Wright, carpenter work 
George K. Boyce, " " 
G. D. B. Robinson, carpenter wor 
A. W. Berry, carpenter work 
Elijah Walker, " " 
J. Q. Twombly, glazing 
J. C. Dyer, 
J. F. Burton, " 
W. L. Snow, hardware, etc., 
H. W. Raymond, " " 
Howe & Flint, " " 
Oscar F. Howe, brooms, etc. 
Boston Woven Hose Co., hose 

and ladders 
Edwin Rogers, fire-alarm appa 

ratus .... 
John L. Crafts, wire rope, etc. 
Fuller, Dana & Fitz, wire . 
Silsby Man'f g Co., fittings . 
Webster & Dustin, track . 
S. D. Hicks & Son, copper . 
A. A. Sanborn, steam fitting 

Atnount carried forward . 



8,221 13 
8 00 

3 00 
11 25 

105 65 
46 60 
37 00 

32 00 
8 15 

21 70 
54 10 
27 12 

4 00 
8 95 

22 00 

1 83 
37 37 

194 68 

33 23 
243 50- 

18 41 

5 45 

2 50 
68 50 
51 81 

1 95 
7 25 

484 01 



$27,100 33 



744 95 




9 34 




12 60 




43 




46 50 




23 22 




8 08 




120,606 26 


127,100 33 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



61 



Amounts hrovgJtt foricard $20,606 

Oliver Whyte, iron netting 
Crosby Steam Gage and Valve Co 

repairing valve 
James H. Vinal & Co., screens 
A. S. Jackson, lanterns 
Dover Stamping Co., ash barrels 
Packard & Burrell, brushes 
Somerville Iron Foundry, castings 
George K. Paul &> Co., cotton 

waste .... 
C. A. Holley, horse clothing 
Curtis & Haskell, dusters . 
L. C. Field, sweepers . 
Hall's English Food Co., food 
Broad Gauge Iron Works, manger 
C. Callahan, valve 
A. E'. Hughes, show-case . 
India Alkali Works, savogran 
J. Hinman, chemicals . 
F. I vers & Son, whip . 
Weeks & Potter, vitriol 
Doolittle & Smith, vitriol . 
Thomas Hollis, vitriol 
George H. Cowdin, drugs . 
J. A. Durell, oil, etc. . 
Charles Bartley, oil 
Knowles Bros., salt, etc. 
E. A. Bailey & Co., salt, etc. 
W. I. Heald, salt, etc. 
Martin L. Hall & Co., soap . 
T. Spelman, soap 
Sturtevant Bros., horses 
John S. Xason, horses 
A. M. Prescott, hay, etc. 
J. A. McLane, use of team . 
George McKenna, use of horse 



1 

1 

31 

6 

8 

2 

15 

2 

9 

4 

5 

1 

35 

18 

13 

59 

2 

20 

28 

107 

1 

2 

8 

2 



3 
10 

528 
675 
400 

20 

80 



26 
15 

50 
52 
10 
00 
75 
00 

55 

70 

63 

50 

00 

75 

00 

00 

14 

86 

25 

74 

56 

27 

35 

84 

63 

00 

50 

91 

75 

00 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 



$27,100 33 



Amounts carried foricard . 



$22,717 31 $27,100 33 



62 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amotfnts brought forward 
Nathan Tufts & Son, grain 
Plummer & Co., hay and 

straw 
Walburg & Woehrn, fresco 

ing 
Thomas Dowel, plastering 
B. M. Boyce, clock 
Mrs. Calvert, washing . 
Thomas H. Daly, washing 
Edw. W. Ring, washing 
J. A. Buxton, washing . 
Samuel H. Stevens, washing 
J. O. Hayden <fc Co., printing 
Fred. H. Barry, printing 
George G. Glines, expressing 
E. R. Perham, " 

Dolhenty's Express, " 
Thorpe's Express, " 
Charles E. Farnham, " 
William J. Loudon, " 
George T. Day, " 

Barker & Tibbetts, " 
P. H. Wellcome, carriage hire 
H. Wellington & Co., fuel 
B. F. Wild & Co., fuel 
New England Telephone and 
Telegi-aph Company, rent- 
als and tolls 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Charlestown Gas Co., gas 
H. D.& W. S. Durgin,ice . 
Boston Ice Co., ice 
Winter Hill Ice Co., ice 
H. C. Willis, veterinary ser- 
vices . . . . 

Amounts carried forward 



122,717 31 
591 32 

619 62 



57,100 33 



11 


00 




21 


09 




42 


00 




34 


22 




32 


88 




21 


21 




25 


51 




25 


08 




45 


45 




12 


00 

25 




21 


95 




1 


30 




3 


40 




1 


75 




1 


25 




27 


51 

50 




10 


00 




602 


77 




463 


02 




76 


65 


- 


247 


88 




130 


92 




63 


00 




14 


00 




8 


00 




28 


00 




25,900 


34 


127,100 33 



APPEXDIX TO TEEASUKEE AXD COLLECTOR S EEPOET. 



63 



Amounts brought joricard . 


§25,900 34 


827,100 33 


Charles R. Simpson, veteri- 






nary services 


97 50 




Page & Littlefield, lumber 


23 63 




VV. S. Walker, painting 


92 10 




Estate of John Leland, wheel- 






wright work 


2 00 




J. M.Burckes, mason work . 


. 27 72 




M. D. Jones & Co., powder . 


1 75 




Edward A. Rice & Co., soda 


25 42 




C. H. Wheelock, gas stove . 


11 60 


" 


Cotter Bros., slating 


17 35- 




Underhill Bros., orrindina; axe 


60 




Paul Kelley, loam 


4 80 




L. B. Angier, sawdust . 


1 75 




S. J. Wood, repairing saw 


50 




Jackson Caldwell & Co., use 




- 


of furniture 


5 00 




C. A. South wick, labor . 


9 50 




Dennis Ryan, " 


14 85 




Edwin H. Bright, " . 


10 00 




J. D. Perkins, Jr., " • 


7 50 




George L. Blackbird, labor . 


12 50 




Albert L. Russell, telegraph 






work .... 


23 52 




Warren H. Edmands, tele- 






graph work 


40 00 


■ 


"William A. Perry, telegraph 






work . . . . 


15 00 




H. P. Ewell, telegraph work 


1 25 




Caleb A. Page, telegraph 






work .... 


12 50 




Benjamin Pond, telegraph 






work . . 


7 00 




John H. Cauley, meals . 


9 30 




Daniel Webster Engine Co., 






refreshments 


10 00 





Amounts carried forward . 826,384 98 $27,100 33 



64 AXXUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . 

Cambridge Engine Co., re- 
freshments 

Crane & Hanscom, premium 
of insurance . . * . 

Highways, account granite' 
paying .... 

Excess and deficiency, bal- 
ance to credit of account . 



HEALTH DEPARTME:N"T. 

I 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount . . $4,500 00 

Cash, receiyed of George I. Vin- 
cent, permits to keep swine 
and goats and collect grease 226 00 

Excess and deficiency, balance to ' 

debit of account . . . 298 21 



■ $2P,384 98 


$27,100 33 


10 00 




15 00 




333 90 




$26,743 88 




356 45 






$27,100 33 





Debit. 

Cash, paid T\"m. H. Brine, salary 
as inspector 
Caleb A. Page, salary as in- 
spector .... 
Jeremiah ]McCarthy, collect- 
ing ashes, etc., . 
John P. Downey, collecting 

ashes, etc., 
M. G. Staples, collecting ashes 
Henry Gray, collecting offal 
Sundry persons, burying dead 
animals .... 
Burt & Henshaw, sulphui' 
West <fc Jenney, " 



$370 


37 


629 


62 


834 


43 


1,658 


75 


1 


25 


900 


00 


' 63 


50 


6 


35 


5 


45 



85,024 21 



Amounts carried forward |4,469 72 $5,024 21 



APPEXDIX TO TEEASUEEE AXD COLLECTOe's EEPOET. 65 

A7nou}its brought fo-ncard, $4,469 72 , 65,024 21 

J. Hubbard & Co., disinfectant 9 25 

Heliotype Printing Co., maps 35 00 

Thomas Groom & Co., station- 
ery 92 00 

•T. O. Hayden & Co., printing 

and advertising, . . 55 95 

McDonnell Bros., advertising 8 00 

City of Cambridge, investigat- 
ing nuisances . . . 10 14 

Thomas Waterman, vaccine 

virus .... 7 00 

Codman & Sburtleff, vaccine 

virus 2 00 

Edward S. TTood, M.D., pro- 
fessional services 

P. TT. Skinner, fumio;atinor . 

J. M. Corse, rent of post-office 
box ..... 

CO. Littlefield, officers' fees 

F. Finnegan, distributing post- 
ers 3 00 

B. F. Sheridan, distributing 

posters .... 12 00 

Thomas MUes, distributing 

posters .... 4 50 

Joshua Hiltz, care of pond . 7 50 

Robert Chew, labor . . 124 26 

Charles Southwick, labor . Ill 70 

H. W. Raymond, tools . . 45 

G. H. HiUs & Co., jugs . 44 
Howe & FUnt, hardware . 80 
L. H. Brown, hack hire . 18 00 
George C. Bonner, hack hire 4 00 
Charles E. Farnham, express- 
ing ..... 60 

Mrs. P. J. Bench, compensa- 
tion for damages . . 25 00 

$5,024 21 



10 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 



66 



ANNUAL REPORTS, 



HIGHWAYS. 




Credit. 




Appropriations, amount assessed 


$44,000 00 


Cash, received of H. S. Atwood, side- 




walk .... 


. 1108 74 


David Cummings, sidewalk 


96 01 


Daniel L. McGregor, " 


54 40 


Bowman & Kendall, trustees 




edgestones . . 


13 04 


Charles Drouet, edgestones 


55 82 


First M. E. Church, " 


42 66 


J. F. Hathaway, " 


108 56 


T. C. Hollander, 


134 83 


F.A.Titus, " 


111 25 


W. L. Snow, " 


28 27 


Harrison Aldrich, labor on di-ive- 




way .... 


13 82 


L. B. Angier, labor on driveway; 


2 00 


E. A. Stone, " " 


6 25 


Chase & Dutch, driveway . 


57 21 


Horace D. Runey, driveway 


9 50 


Marvin 0. Royce, driveway 


10 44 


Lewis Hollis, driveway 


13 52 


S. T. Kirk, driveway . 


10 48 


Ewen McLeod, driveway 


1 69 


F. D. Woodbridge, driveway 


14 72 


Mary E. Vinal, driveway . 


3 32 


L. P. Hollander, bricks, etc., 


16 61 


Jere. McCarthy, " " . 


37 80 


Edward Colleton, " " 


81 25 


Charles A. Morgan, stone 


4 50 


W m. A. Muzzey, labor 


4 00 


H. G. Beane, pasturage 


240 00 


R. M. Baldwin, rowen 


30 00 


Daniel Hoar, " 


5 00 . 


Charles Howard, horse 


75 00 


Arthur Murley, rent . . 


64 00 


Amounts carried forward . 


$1,454 69 $44,000 00 



APPENDIX TO TEEASIJEER AND COLLECTOR S EEPOET. 



A7noiints brought forward . $1,454 69 
Thomas Ormand, rent . . 72 00 

Public Grounds account, use of 

horse 39 20 

Fire Department account, pav- 

pa\ing blocks ... 333 90 
Miscellaneous account, crushed 



$44,000 00 



stone .... 


6 


00 


Sidewalk account, labor, etc. 


658 


00 


Boston & Lowell R. R. Co. 


5 




labor, etc. . • . 


393 


94 

9 Qt7 Tq 






^,t7»J < < O 




846,957 73 


Debit. 






Cash, paid laborers . . . . 


^23,880 


23 


Frank G. Williams, salary a« 






superintendent 


. 1,500 


00 


Board of horses 


505 


72 


Welch & Hall, horses 


350 


00 


Nathan Tufts & Son, grain 


534 


54 


Fulton O'Biion, " 


240 


31 


R. W. Willey&Co., " . 


165 


27 


A. M. Prescott, " . 


142 


71 


Powers &> Co., " 


216 


63 


C. H. Proctor, hay 


220 


07 


Thomas R. Cook, hay 


172 


88 


Chase & Dutch, grain 


202 


00 


John F. Ayer, lumber 


662 


95 


B. F. Clough & Co., lumber 


27 


00 


Sanborn & Hatch, bricks . 


446 


39 


John Thresher, " 


128 


25 


H. Mitchell, round stone 


. 1,028 


25 


Albert A. Libby & Co., round 






stone . . . . . 


30 


50 


J. Turner & Co., stone 


55 


36 



Amounts carried forward ., .$30,509 06 $46,957 73 



68 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 


$30,509 06 $46,957 78 


Jeremiah McCarthy, paving 


r 


blocks, etc. 


959 84 


J. J. Meaney, sand 


15 00 


Cheatham Parks, filling 


38 40 


George H. Sampson, powder, etc 


163 01 


Miller & Shaw, storage bins at 




crusher . . . . . 


615 08 


Oliver Whyte, screens 


15 00 


Osgood & Hart, castings 


32 85 


Waldo Bros., tools 


7 20 


Farrell Foundry & Machine Co 




castings for crusher 


143 53 


Sylvester & Co., spikes 


2 70 


Jos. M. Cusker, tool handles 


19 90 


Parker & Wood, repairing haj/ 




cutter 


11 75 


David M. Crock er,repairing buggy 


103 25 


W. L. Snow, repairs . 


8 06 


J. Leland, wheelwright work 


43 40 


F. H. Flagg, " " 


13 00 


George Tyler & Co., repairs 


9 20 


M. D. Jones & Co., stable 




work .... 


7 50 


Whitney & Snow, hardware 


144 15 


H. W. Raymond, " 


41 78 


Howe & Flint, " 


4 50 


Wm. B. Berry & Co., sign 


50 


Underbill Bros., tools 


2 20 


Samuel Walker & Co., oil 


22 07 


J. F. Jones & Co., " 


3 90 


H. T. Crocker, oil and waste 


85 51 


Snow Flake Oil Co., grease 


12 00 


James H. Maguire, tallow . 


95 


W. Emery & Co., windows 


5 75 


J. A. Durell, glass 


1 66 


Page & Harris, use of sleigh 


2 00 


Amounts carried forward . 


.$32,994 70 $46,957 73 



APPENDIX TO TREASUKEE AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



69 



Amounts brought forward 
Timotliy O'Brien, horseslioeing 
C. W. Ingalls, horseslioeing 
M. Lynch, horseshoeing 
John Kellogg, " 
A. Clement " 

Chas. T. Southwick . 
P. O'Xeil, horseshoeing 
F. Dooris, blacksmithing 
Seward Dodge, blacksmithing 
Jas. Forgie & Son, harnesses 
E. Spalding, harness work . 
J. Q. Twombly, painting 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
Richardson & Brown, stencil 
S. J. Wood, filing saws 
Geo. S. Cheney & Co., drugs, 
A. S. Symmes, " 

Chas. R. Simpson, veterinaiy 

services .... 
Rufus G. Brown & Co., 

preventative . 
X. E. Fitz & Co., wharfage 
Kew-Engiand Telephone 

Telegraph Co., rentals and toll: 
J. A. Litchfield, meal 
Thos. Groom & Co., stationery 
J.O. Havden & Co. advertisingr 
City of Boston, water-rates 
George C. Bonner, hack-hire 
Western Union Telegraph Co. 

telegrams 
Boston and Providence R. R. Co. 

freight .... 
Fitchburg Railroad Co., trans 

porting gravel 



rust 



and 



2,994 


70 


$46,957 73 


462 


02 




15 


72 




5 


00 
75 




3 


50 




3 


45 




7 


58 




159 


08 




277 


02 




188 


08 




119 


48 




3 


00 




52 


16 




2 


50 




4 


75 




25 


63 




7 


50 





57 75 

26 60 

68 55 

75 80 
4 17 
54 50 
40 50 
48 00 
7 00 

52 

3 71 

5,208 00 



Araoimts carried forward . .$39,927 02 $46,957 73 



70 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



A'inoiints brought foricard 

E. R. Perham, expressing . 
Geo. G. Glines, " 
Blackall's Express, " 
H. Wellington & Co., fuel 
S. A. Stewart & Co., buggy 

F. O. Reed, and others, loam 
John R. Thompson, labor . 
F. A. Rolfe, flannel . 
Wm. Canavan, damage to post 
American Enamel Co., signs, 
Town of Winchester, taxes, 
Town of Wakefield, " 
City of Waltham, " 
Town of Medford, half cost of 

maintaining Middlesex Avenue 

bridge .... 
Fairbairn & McKenna, officers 

fees .... 
American Steam Boiler Ins. Co.. 

premium of insurance 
Middlesex Registry of Deeds 

recording 
William Hamilton, mowing 
Water-maintenance account, re 

pairing fountain 
Sidewalk-Assessments' acct., side 

walk on Elm street. 
Town of Arlington, half cost of 

water-gates 



$39,927 02 
1 50 

1 03 

2 00 
311 71 
200 00 

27 20 

4 32 

1 40 

6 00 

48 72 

10 69 

26 94 

117 30 



5,690 14 

10 00 

75 00 

1 65 
37 00 

37 28 

41 81 

27 34 



$46,957 73 



$46,606 05 



Excess and deficiency, balance to 
credit of account . 



351 68 



$46,957 73 



APPEJfDIX TO TEEASUEEE A'SB COLLECTOe's EEPOET. 71 

HIGHWAY betterme:n^t ASSESSMEXTS. 

Ceedit. 
Cash received from sundry persons, assessments, $50 00 

Debit. 
Balance from 1887 $50 00 



$2,513 40 
Balance to credit in acct,, 1889 7,486 60 



HOSE HOUSE m WARD FOUR. 

Ceedit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed . . . $10,000 00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid B. W. Lawrence, travelling 

expenses ..... $13 40 
Coon & Hall, on account of 

contract .... 2,500 00 



Debit. 
Cash, paid sundry persons . 



$10,000 00 



INDIGENT SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 

Ceedit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed . . . ^500 00 

State of Massachusetts, indigent soldiers and 

sailors, one-half of amount paid in 1888 
Excess and deficiency, balance to debit of account 



506 


50 


6 


50 


$1,013 


00 


$1,013 


00 



72 ANNUAL KEPORTS. 



INTEREST. 








Credit. 








Appropriations, amount assessed 


• • 


$30,000 


00 


Real estate liens, interest on titles 








to the city on property deeded for 








non-payment of taxes 


$2 38 






Cash, received on deposits in banks 


^ 715 00 






On taxes and assessments . 


6,441 88 






Of State treasurer, national bank 








tax ..... 


4,243 79 






Corporation tax . 


6,935 67 






Foreign ships tax 


638 59 




' 


On tax titles released 


7 04 






Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, 








premium on bonds . . 


457 02 


19,441 


.^7 






O i 




$49,441 


37 



Debit. ' 
Cash, paid on funded debt, 

$485,000, one year at 4 per cent. 119,400 00 

$52,000, s*x months at 4 per cent. 1,040 00 

$354,500, one year at 5 per cent. 17,725 00 

$23,000, six months at 5 per cent. 575 00 

$10,000, one year at 5i per cent. 550 00 



$39,290 00 
Less coupons unpaid . , . 285 00 



$30,005 00 
Sundiy persons, coupons unpaid 285 00 



$39,290 00 



Cash, paid on temporary loans : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
on not6 of" $50,000,' three 
months at 5 per cent. . . 625 00 



Amounts carried forward . . 1625 00 $49,441 37 



APPEXDIX TO TEEASFRER AIS"© COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



Amounts brought forward 

F. S. Moseley & Co., on note ot 
$25,000 six months at 6 per 
cent. ..... 

F. S. Mosley & Co., on note of 
$25,000, six months at 6 per 
cent. . . . . . 

F. S. Moseley & Co., on note of 
$20,000, six months at 6 per 
cent. . . . . . 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note of 
$25,000, four months at 5i per 
cent. ..... 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
on note of $200,000, eight 
months at 4i per cent. . 



8625 00 849,441 37 



750 00 



'50 00 



600 00 



437 50 



On funded debt . 

On temporary loans . 



Excess and deficiency balance to 
to credit of account 



6,075 00 

#_ 

$9,237 50 

39,290 00 
9,237 50 

$48,527 50 
913 87 



$49,441 37 



MISCELLAXEOUS. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed 
Real estate hens, costs on titles to the 
city on property deeded for non- 
payment of taxes . . . 31 40 
Cash, received of sundry persons, 
costs on property sold and pre- 
pared for sale for non-payment 
of taxes and assessment . . 607 70 
On real estate liens released . 3 00 



$4,000 00 



Amounts carried forward . 



8642 10 84,000 00 



74 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Sundry persons liquor licenses 
Thomas Cunningham, milk in- 
spectors fees .... 
Mark F. Burns, county fees 
Eugene Gormley, horse 
Frank X. Williams, old iron 
Salvatore B. Deblaise, license 
Edward Foote, land on Bond 
Street . . . . . 

City Hall improvement, steam 
fitting . . . . . 

Charles E. Gilman, city clerk : — 

Marriage certificates . $15 00 

Recording mortgages . 17 75 

Junk licenses . . 2 00 



George I. Vincent, city clerk : — 

Marria,ge certificates . $168 50 

Recording mortgages . 290 75 

Licensing dogs . . 239 00 

Junk licenses . . 70 00 

Liquor " . . 21 00 

Auctioneer licenses . 16 00 

Billiard tables licensed 10 00 

Miscellaneous . . 12 75 



Debit. 
Cash, paid A. S. Arnold, carpentry, 
L. Arnold, 
F. A. Chandler, 
F. C. Fuller, 
S. T. Kirk, 
R. A. Stevens, 
E. Spalding, harness work, 
Charles Maguire, horseshoeing 

Amounts carried forward . 



1642 


10 


21 


00 


140 


00 


2 


00 


65 


00 


9 


03 


25 


00 


2,774 


45 


84 


33 



$4,000 00 



34 75 



828 00 



$1 50 

7 00 
60 67 

106 78 

53 76 

6 21 

10 60 

8 75 



$4,625 66 
$8,625 66 



$255 27 $8,625 66 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



75 



Amounts brought forward 
Seward Dodge, horseslioeing 
Timothy O'Brien, " 
C. A. Legallee, plumbing 
Pierce & Jackson, " 

F. A. Norris, painting, 
Haley & Perkins, " 
J. Q. Twombly, " >• 
A. A. Sanborn, steam-fitting, 
Wm. H. Poole, gas-fitting . 
Ingalls & Richardson, steam- 
fitting .... 

Whitney & Dunmore, repairing 
bell .... 

G. M. D. Fernald, gong 
Frederick P. Wallgren, bronzing 
Bigelow & Dowse, tape, etc. 
John P. Lovell Arms Co., line. 
Frost & Adams, engineer's sup 

plies .... 
Buff & Berger, transit 
A. W. Mitchell, silver badges, 
Shreve, Crump & Low Co., gas 

fixtures .... 

E. Yan Noorden & Co., ventila 
tors .... 

Boston Nickel-plate Co., plating 

Educational Supply Co., lacto- 

scope ..... 

F. P. Williams,engineer's supplies 
Derby & Kilmer Desk Co., desks 
P. Derby & Co., office chairs. 
Smith & Co., altering book-case 
William H. Brine, repaii^ing 

furniture .... 

Page & Littlefield, carpentering 
C. S. Decker, awnings 

Amounts carried forward . 



$255 27 

11 77 

2 25 

8 60 

6 50 

25 50 

13 84 

17 02 

48 65 

15 13 

10 95 



,625 66 



1 


00 


6 


30 


43 


50 


24 


51 


1 


40 


34 


04 


242 


25 


12 


25 



110 00 



111 


00 


2 


25 


4 


00 


7 


95 


88 


00 


20 


00 


40 


00 


639 


77 


7 


50 


13 


70 



$1,824 90 



,625 66 



76 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Atnounts brought forward 
Bishop Brothers, ladder 
I. H. Brown & Co., himber 
C. A. Slager, voting-list boards 
Daniel Crocker, repairing clock 
George D. Goodrich, drainpipe 
J. A. Chabot, repairing lock 
Union Square Carriage Co., re 

pairing buggy 
Walworth Manufacturing Co. 

pipe .... 

Howe & Flint, hardware 
H. W. Raymond, hardware 
Whitney & Snow, " 
Jacob Woodbury, " 
James F. Davlin, chimneys 
Murphy, Leavens & Co., brushes 
Hopkins & Fullerton, furniture 
Tobias & Wall, leather bag 

E. B. Sears, robe 
Hill & Langtry, robe, etc. . 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., furniture 

F. G. Ray & Co., dry goods 
Pulsifer, Jordan & Pfaff, sta- 
tionery .... 

C. M. Blake, newspapers 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
A. C. Winning, mason work 
E. H. Marsh, return of deaths 
W.A.Flaherty, " 
P. H. Rafferty, " 
C. H. Lockhart, " 
H. D. Runey, " 
Jos. J. Kelley, " 
H. P. Mackechnie, return of births 
H. B. Mclntii-e, " " 

John F. Couch, " " 



,824 90 


$8,625 66 


5 05 




12 84 




11 10 




3 00 




2 70 




3 00 





26 25 

25 

16 83 

30 62 

26 27 

40 

1 00 

67 

16 00 

6 50 

12 00 
10 90 

35 85 
4 40 

4 55 

6 00 
■3 85 

13 26 
25 75 

36 25 
21 25 
16 25 
25 00 

3 .50 

4 25 
1 25 

54 25 



Amounts carried forward . $2,265 94 



^,625 66 



APPEXDIX TO TEEASUREE AXD COLLECTOE S EEPORT. 



/ i 



Amounts hr ought forioard 


$2,265 


94 S8,625 66 


E. A. Sanborn, return of births 


4 


00 


F. W. Taylor, 




75 


R. L. Lane, " " 


5 


00 


J. A. Gregg, " " 


4 


25 


J. A. Coburn, " " 


1 


50 


Geo. Ciillis, « " 


190 


50 


Geo. CuUis, affidavit of posting 


45 


50 


J. A. McLane, posting # . 


52 


10 


Xew England Telephone and 






Telegraph Co., rentals and tolls 


258 


30 


A. L. Russell, repairing igniter 


1 


00 


Engineers' assistants, car fares. 






etc. . . . . . 


17 


45 


J. H. Brooks, engineers' supplies 




46. 


John Canavan, washing powder 




50 


L. D. Miller, polish . 


1 


00 


India Alkali Works, savogran 


3 


12 


B. F. Wild & Co., fuel 


199 


65 


H. Wellington & Co., fuel . 


47 


25 


Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 


3-18 


62 


City of Boston, water-rates 


26 


67 


R . T . Blackwell, horse-keeping . 


309 


23 


Jairus Mann, watching, etc. 


89 


23 


M. A. Mann, laundrying 


18 


00 


S.J. Wood, keys 


8 


60 


M. G. Staples, teaming 


1 


00 


A. M. Prescott, " . 


31 


50 


Stilphen & Co., expressing 


2 


90 


Chas. E. Farnham, " 


6 


75 


William J. London, " 


16 


90 


Thorpe's Express, " 




65 


E. R. Perham, " 




55 


George T. Day, " 




25 


Alfred E. Mann, carriage-hire 


12 


00 


H. M. Weld, 


10 


00 


P. H. Wellcome, " 


5 


00 


Amounts carried forvmrd . 


. $3,956 


12 $8,625 66 



78 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Ward Officers . 
Philip Eberle, use of hall 
L. B. Pillsbmy, 

F. A. White, " 
N. L. Pennock, labor 
William H. Kelley, " 
W. H. Laskey, " 
George H. Maynard, " 
L. M. Maynard, " 
CM. Whitcomb, " 
William H. Denton, " 
James Deacon, " 
P. O'Connell, « 

E. H. Bright, " 
Phebe Arnold, " 
George W. Prichard, teaming 
Geo. F. Ricker, cleaning carpet 
J. H. Colbath, ringing bell, 

A. M. Sibley, " 

Fred Young, " 

T.G.Poland, " 

Lemuel G. Trott, " 

G. W. Littlefield, » 

C. W. Sawyer, services as auc 

tioneer .... 
S. H. Libby, services as auc 

tioneer .... 
Livermore & Fish, legal fees, 
Chas. B. Stevens, recording 

deeds, etc. 
George T. Unwin, drugs 
James Benson, oiling flag-staff 
F.O.Reed, rent of rifle range 
H.D. & W. S.Durgin, ice 

F. D. Lapham, premium of insur 
ance .... 

Amounts carried forward . 



$3,956 12 

288 00 

25 00 

12 00 
15 00 

9 00 
4 00 
4 00 
2 25 
15 00 
1 25 
4 00 
4 10 

1 75 
19 13 

9 15 

13 13 

14 01 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 

2 00 
6 00 

3 00 

52 08 



,625 66 



7 


20 


60 


24 


8 


05 


2 


10 


19 


30 


150 


00 


35 


00 


6 


00 



14,771 86 



$8,625 66 



APPEXDIX TO TEEASTTREE AND COLLECTOR'S EEPOET. 79 



Amounts hr ought forvmrd 

F. E. Whitcomb, horse 

Crane & Hanscom, premiuni of 
insurance . . . . 

W. H. Way, veterinary services 

A. Colman, sealer of weights and 
measures . . . . 

James Carney, floral design 

W. R. Cann, services at church 

J. Tyler Hicks & Co., refresh- 
ments . . . . . 

Sturtevant Bros., turkeys . 

A. H. Atwood, " 

Wm. S. Ward, " 

Willard C. Kinsley Post 139, 
G. A. R., contribution for ob- 
servance of Memorial Day 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, one-fourth of amount re- 
ceived for liquor licenses 

Susan McCauley, compensation 
for damages 

John M. Corse, rent of Post 
Office box 

A. B. Fales, clerical services 

William F. Priest, " 

Chas. S. Robertson, " 

Beulah M. Pierce, " 

Clara M. Smith, " 

Amy L. Manning, " 

Chas. E. Oilman, stamps 

A. W. Mitchell, rubber stamp 

Water maintenance, thawing 
water pipe 

Highway acct., crushed stone 

Sewer Assessments' account 
sewer in Highland Avenue 

Amounts carried forward . 



,771 


86 


250 


00 


11 


00 


8 


00 


75 


00 


25 


00 


5 


84 


73 


39 


2 


00 


90 


00 


112 


47 



$8,625 66 



300 00 



5 25 



150 00 



4 


00 


549 


00 


40 


00 


69 


00 


137 


44 


30 


00 


4 


00 


6 


10 


2 


25 


56 


05 


6 


00 



97 33 



$6,880 98 



^,625 66 



80 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

A9720imts hroxight forimrd . $6,880 98 $8,625 66 
Scliool-House Incidentals ac- 
count, transferred . . 1,700 00 

8,580 98 



Excess and deficiency, balance to credit of 

account ....... 44 68 



PKOPERTY AND DEBT BALANCE. 

Credit. 

Renewals of funded debt . . $27,000 00 
Public property acquired during 

the year 1888 . . . 24,242 39 

Reduction of funded debt . . 689,50000 



^,625 66 



OVERLAY AND ABATEMENT. 

Credit. 

Taxes, amount added to the amount of taxes as- 
sessed as fractional divisions for conveni- 
ence in apportionment, to be applied to 
abatement on taxes ..... $3,086 84 

Excess and deficiency, balance to debit of account 7,871 47 



$10,958 31 



Debit. 
Taxes, for amount of abatements on taxes . $10,958 31 



OVERPLUS ON TAX SALES. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1887 $102 13 

Debit. 
Balance to 1889 1102 13 



$740,742 39 

Amount carried forward . *. . . $740,742 39 



appe:js'dix to teeastjkee axd collector's eepoet. 81 

Amount brought forward .... $740,742 39 

Debit. 

Balance from 1887 . . . 8259,718 95 

Appropriations .... 52,000 00 

Public property sold during the 

year 1888 .... 2,500 00 

Balance to credit in account 1888, 426,523 44 

8740,742 89 



PUBLIC PROPERTY. 

Credit. 
Property and debt balance, joroperty sold during 

the year 1888 $2,500 00 

Balance to debit in account 1889, . . . 1,287,023 44 



81,289,523 44 

Debit. 

Balance from 1887 . . . 81,265,281 05 

Property and debt balance, prop- 
erty acquired during the 
year 1888 .... 24,242 39 

81,289,528 44 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Credit. 










Balance from 1887 


. 


• 


$1,012 


17 


Appropriatiojis, amount assessed 


• • 


• 


3,000 


00 


Cash, received on county treas- 










urer, return of dog licenses 










for 1887 .... 


82,888 


30 






H. A. Adams, librarian, fines 


283 


57 






Catalogues .... 


46 


15 


2,718 


02 








Excess and deficiency, balance to 


debit of 


ac- 






count .... 


• 


• 


12 


94 



Amount carried forward .... $6,743 13 



82 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... 

Debit. 

Cash, paid Little, Brown & Co., books |2,116 81 

Estes & Lauriat, books . . 813 53 

Laugliton,Macdonald&Co.,books 317 27 

Henry C. N'ash, books . . 22 20 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 176 00 

William H. Thompson, books, . 33 00 

Balch Brothers & Graham, books 14 00 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books . 7 50 

B. B. Rnssell, books ... 29 50 
Martin, Garrison & Co., books . 7 00 
D. Appleton & Co., books . . 6 00 

C. A. Robinson, books . . 2 75 
J. Buchanan Henry, books . . 1 50 
J. G. Roberts & Co., binding books 96 53 
Ira Bradley &> Co., binding books 12 00 
George B. Jones, atlas . . 8 00 
Clark & Carruth, stationery . 3 75 
Thomas Groom & Co., " . 60 
^NT. L. Chamberlain, stamp ribbon 1 50 
Babb & Stephens, printing . 230 25 
Rockwell & Churchill, printing . 847 50 

C. M. Blake, newspapers . . 12 00 
B. F. Wild & Co., fuel . . 198 45 
H. Wellington & Co. . . . 5 00 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas . 173 29 

D. P. Bucknam, mason work . 29 68 
A. C. Winning, mason work . 7 25 
F. A. Norris, painting . . 19 33 
F. A. Chandler, carpenter work . 4 20 
John K. Ricker, car|)enter work 75 00 
Walker & Pratt, Man'f'g Co., 

steam fitting . . . 90 46 

William H. Poole, gas fitting . 2 60 

Fox, McDormand & Co., ladder 19 50 



$6,743 13 



Amounts carried forward 



14,883 95 



),743 18 



APPENDIX TO TJREASUKER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



83 



Amounts brought foricard . 


14,883 95 


_ $6,743 


IS 


H. W. Raymond, hardware 


4 36 






Howe & Flint, " 


5 25 






Whitney & Snow, " 


3 95 






S. J. Wood, fitting keys, etc. 


2 75 






City of Boston, water 


29 00 






B. F. Smith, pumping 


3 00 






Charles A. Mongan, drain . 


45 80 






Wm. J. Loudon, expressing 


27 45 






C. E. Farnham, " 


19 50 






C. A. Southwick, labor 


2 00 






E. H. Bright, labor . 


6 75 






Chas. S. Robertson, prem. of ins 


67 50 






Crane & Hanscom, premium of 








insurance . . . . 


33 75 






H. A. Adams, librarian 


700 00 






Charlotte I. Hopkins, assistant . 


400 00 






Anna L. Stone, assistant 


300 00 






Mary Warren, " 


112 60 






Harry J. Pillsbury, assistant 


80 30 






Amy L. Manning, " 


10 92 






A. B. Souther, " 


4 30 










$6,743 


13 



PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed . 

Excess and deficiency, balance to debit of account 



16,000 00 
146 66 



Debit. 

Cash, paid laborers .... $2,247 94 
G. W. Manning, labor on fiag 

staff 16 68 

Walter Bates, concreting . 1,872 95 



Amounts carried forward 



16,146 66 



$4,137 57 $6,146 66 



84 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts hr ought forinard 


$4,137 


57 $6,146 m 


John Turner & Co., paving 


184 


86 


Christopher Burke, loam 


365 


39 


Paul Kelley, loam 


18 


69 


T. F. Crimmings, manure . 


650 


64 


John Maloy, " 


166 


72 


Fred. Burrows, " 


54 


40 


L. M. Maynard, " 


18 


00 


John Regan, " 


9 


60 


Joseph Breck & Son, grass seed 


78 


22 


John F.Ayer, lumber 


28 


21 


I. H. Brown & Co., lumber . 


6 


91 


T. F. Farrington, carpenter work 


149 


70 


F. A. Chandler, " " 


3 


90 


C. A. Legallee, plumbing , 


1 


90 


H. W. Raymond, hardware 


2 


44 


Whitney &, Snow, " 


53 


35 


Howe & Flint, " 


1 


15 


J. A. Durell, line, etc.. 


3 


18 


Dennis C. Collins, teaming 


28 


50 


Leavitt & Woodworth, plants 


10 


00 


Thomas Young, " 


68 


40 


C.T. Southwick, repairing mowei 


14 


94 


F. Dooris, repairing mower 


1 


50 


Joseph Young, care of lawn, etc 


21 


00 


L. A. fright, repairing mower 


3 


35 


E. H. Bright, labor . 


4 


81 


Daniel Murphy, labor 


7 


44 


Dennis O'Rouke, " . 


7 


44 


E. R. Perham, expressing . 


4 


75 


Seward Dodge, blacksmithing 




50 


Highways account, use of horse 


39 


20 






qp\J,XTrU y)\J 



APPENDIX TO TREASUEEE AXD COLLECTOe's EEPOET. 85 

PRIXTIXG AXD STATIOXERY. 

Ceedit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of Fox, Marner 
& Co., advertising 
Eastern Freight Car Heater 

Co., advertising 
Ferris & Snow, advertising . 
Mystic Hat Co., 



a 



Excess and deficiency, balance to debit ot account 



Debit. 

Cash, paid J. O. Hayden & Co., 

printing and adyertising . . $1,344 47 

McDonnell Bros., adyertising . 57 25 
Rand, Ayery & Co., printing 

annual reports . . . 715 46 

Goodwin & Drisko, printing . 5 00 

Babb & Stephens, " . 109 50 

Bufford's Sons, " . 90 00 

Helioty|)e Printing Co., maps, . 5 00 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery, 1,311 08 

Charles E. Pierce, stationery . 80 

Derby& Kilmer Desk Co.,ink stand 3 00 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., books, 10 00 

Geo. I. Vincent, postage stamps . 3 74 

Someryille Citizen, adyertising . 18 50 





$3,000 00 




« 


$1 50 




3 90 




3 80 




6 60 






15 80 


)t account 


657 95 



$3,673 75 



$3,673 75 



POLICE. 

Ceedit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed . . . . $30,000 00 

Police Signal System, transferred . . . 825 94 
Cash received of H. A. Chapin, clerk of court, for 

ofiicers' fees, fines, etc. . . . . 3,210 89 



Amount carried forward .... $34,036 83 



86 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount hrought foricard . 

Debit 

Cash, paid M. C. Parkhurst, chief 

, K. jR. Perry, captain . 
Samuel R. Dow, sergeant 
Edward McGarr, " 
C. C. Cavanagh, " 
George W. Bean, patrolman 
Samuel A. Brown, " 
George A. Bodge, " 
Patrick J. Bench, " 

Edward M. Carter, " 
Eugene A. Carter, " 
George H. Carlton, " 
Charles L. Ellis, " 

John E. Fuller, " 

James F. Foley, . " 
John Hafford, 
Edward E. Hamblin, " 
John F. Johnson, " 

William H. Johnston, " 
Myron H. Kingsley, " 
Dennis Kelley, " 

Ivan Laighton, " 

Herbert H. Miller, " 
Judson W. Oliver, " 
F. A. Perkins, " 

P. W. Skinner, '^ 

Albion L. Staples, " 
George L. Smith, " 

Charles S. Thrasher, " 
Charles E. Woodman, " 
E. F. Backus, patrolman (special) 
T. E. Herron, " " 

M. C. Parkhurst, lock-up keeper 
" " disbursements 

Samuel R. Dow, car fares, etc. 

Amounts carried forward . 



$34,036 83 



$1,700 00 
1,400 00 
1,100 00 
1,100 J30 
1,100*00 
1,006 50 
1,006 50 
1,006 50 

880 00 
1,006 50 
1,006 50 
1,006 50 

985 00 
1,006 50 

993 25 
1,006 50 
1,006 50 
1,006 50 

993 25 
1,006 50 

998 25 
1,006 50 
1,006 50 
1,006 50 
1,004 75 
1,006 50 
1,006 50 
1,003 75 

993 25 

797 50 
16 50 
56 00 

100 00 

1 00 

34 67 



$31,361 17 $34,036 83 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEE AXD COLLECTOE S EEPORT. 



Amounts brought for mar d 
Dennis Kelley, car fares, etc. 
P. W. Skinner, " " 

Edward E. Hamblin, " " 

George H. Carlton, " " 

Xew England Telephone and Tel- 
egraph Company, rentals and 
tolls 
R. T. Blackwell, horse-keeping 
Timothy O'Brien, horse-shoeing 
Geo. L. Brownell, patrol wagon 
Sturtevant & Bros., horse . 
Union Square Carriage Co., re 

pairs .... 
Charles E. Berry, harnesses 

E. Spalding, repairing harnesses 
etc. .... 

D. J. Bennett, repairing har 

nesses, etc. 
W. H. Way, veterinary services 
H. W. Raymond, hardware 

F. D. Snow, " 
S. B. Locke & Co. " 
T. F. Small, painting wagon 
Seward Dodge, blacksmithing 
Howe & Flint, supplies 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., furni 

ture, etc. 
H. D. & W. S. Durgin, ice 
J. O. Hayden & Co., printing 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
M. R. Warren, stationery'- . 
J. Hubbard & Co., disinfectant 
George W. Simmons & Co. 

wi'eaths .... 
Simon Connor, wreaths 
A. W. Mitchell, badges 

Amounts carried forward . 



631,361 


17 


834,036 83 


34 


10 




•2 


20 




1 


85 




1 


30 




465 


27 




368 


75 




20 


75 




450 


00 




250 


00 




98 


52 




60 


00 





68 15 



5 


00 


4 


00 


24 


13 


1 


00 


2 


01 


20 


00 


6 


40 


13 


30 


48 


98 


30 


00 


38 


92 


30 


30 


3 


00 


4 


00 


2 


50 


3 


00 


12 


00 


833,430 


60 834,036 83 



88 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward, $33,430 60 $34,036 83 

Samuel O. Aborn, hat trimmings 17 50 

Scovell Manufacturing Co., but- 
tons 31 50 

Boston Mckel Plating Co., plat- 
ing ..... 75 

D. Cutter, repairing badges . 1 00 

W. K. Young, meals ... 9 00 

Lizzie Avery, washing . . 20 40 

T. Cronin, teaming . . . 9 05 

Somerville Electric Light Co., 

poles, etc. .... 46 00 

F. E. Pettingill & Co., tree trim- 
mer ..... 

W. J. London, expressing . 

P. O'Connell, conveying prison- 
ers ..... 

Patrick Kelley, conveying prison- 
ers ...... 

Thomas P. Frost, conveying pris- 
oners ..... 

S. J. Wood, keys 

C. M. Blake, newspapers 

Eben Jackson, professional ser- 
vices . . . ' . . 2 00 



2 


50 


1 


25 


2 


00 


2 


00 


7 


90 




25 


14 


60 



133,598 30 
Excess and deficiency balance to credit 

of account .... 438 53 



$34,036 88 



POLICE STATIC]^ INCIDE:N^TALS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed . $2,000 00 

School-house in Ward Three trans- 
ferred ..... 1349 07 



Amounts carried forward . . $349 07 $2,000 00 



APPEXDIX TO TEEASIIEER AXD COLLECTOe's EEPOET. 89 



Amounts hroucjht foricard 
School-house in TVard Four trans- 
ferred . . . . . 

Cash, received of Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts, rent of armory 
Somerville Co-operative Bank 

use of court room . 
Willard C.Kinsley Post 139, G 

A. R., use of hall . 
Post Relief Association, use of 

hall .... 

Robert Luce, use of hall 
X. K. Bishop, " " " 
Washington Canton I. O. of O. F 

use of hall 
C. C. Cavanagh, old lumber 



8349 07 
204 45 



f 

7 8400 


00 


52 


00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


15 


00 


12 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 



82,000 00 



553 52 



568 00 



$3,121 52 



Debit 

Cash, paid TTm. D. Hayden, janitor 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
City of Boston, water 
H. Wellington & Co., fuel . 

B. F. Wild & Co., fuel 
George W. Young, closets for 

armory .... 
Leonard Arnold, carj^enter work 
S. & C. H. WiUiams, " 
F. A. Chandler, " 

A. A. Sanborn^ steam-fitting 
W. H. Poole, gas piping . 

C. A. Legallee, plumbing . 
James F. Davlin, " 

D. P. Bucknam, mason work 
■ Fred. Davis, whitewashing 

D. W. McDermott, painting, etc 

Amounts carried forward 



r $764 


00 




503 


59 




63 


00 




440 


45 


' 


48 


00 




r 

472 


75 




k. 22 


27 




103 


51 




4 


50 




36 


16 




14 


22 




45 


82 




41 


63 




18 


25 


• 


7 


50 




!. 9 


83 





82,595 48 $3,121 52 



90 



AN^NUAL REPORTS. 



12,595 


48 


13 


90 


8 


00 


9 


40 


51 


25 


2 


33 


1 


50 


22 


00 



Am,ou7its brought forward 

H. W. Raymond, hardware 

Howe & Flint, " 

C. A. Holmes, " 

Boston Chair Manufacturing Co. 
chairs 

A. G. Whitcomb, chairs 

Hopkins & Fullerton, repairing 
chair ..... 

H. A. Hartley & Co., rugs 

Wm. L. Fox & Co., star com- 
pound . . . . . 

American Steam Boiler Insurance 
Co., premium of insurance 

S. J. Wood, fitting keys 

Thorpe's Express, expressing 

E. H. Bright, labor 

A. M. Prescott, labor 

Willard C. Kingsley Post, 139 
G. A. R., rent refunded . 



$2,799 66 
Excess and deficiency, balance to 

credit of account . . . 321 86 



^3,121 52 



5 00 



75 


00 




25 




30 


2 


25 


1 


00 


12 


00 



POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM. 






Credit. 






Appropriations, amount assessed 


• 


• 


Debit. 






Cash, paid Municipal Signal Co. : — 






25 alarm boxes and apparatus 


$3,488 


88 


F. E. Pettingill & Co., supplies 


454 


37 


H. W. Raymond, supplies . 


13 


12 


Howe & Flint, supplies 


1 


15 


S. J. Wood, supplies . 




25 


Laborers .... 


165 


25 


C. W. Moulton & Co., ladder 


10 


00 



Amounts carried forward 



1,121 52 



$5,000 00 



t,133 02 



15,000 00 



APPENDIX TO TPtEASUEEE A2sD COLLECTOe's EEPORT. 91 

Amounts IrougJd forward . . 84,133 02 85,000 00 

Bishop & Brother, hook-j^ole . 7 00 

M. C. Parkhurst, car fares, etc. . 34 04 



$4,174 06 

Police, transferred . . . 825 94 



Debit. 

Balance from 1887 .... $321 67 
Taxes, titles deeded to the city for 

non-payment of taxes 
Interest, for non-payment of interest 
Miscellaneous, for non-payment of 

costs ..... 



20 


02 


2 


38 


31 


40 



$5,000 00 



REAL ESTATE LIEXS. 

Ceedit. 

Cash, received of sundry persons for tax titles 

released 839 89 

Balance to debit in account, 1889 . . . 335 58 



$375 47 



$375 47 



REDUCTIOX OF FUXDED DEBT. 

Credit. 

A]3propriations, amount aj^propriated . . . $35,187 34 

Cash received of Commissioners of the sinking 

funds 654,312 66 



$689,500 00 

Debit. 

Property and debt balance, amount of reduction of 

funded debt, in 1888 8 689,500 00 

PvEXEWALS OF FUXDED DEBT. 

Ceedit. 

Appropriations, amount authorized by loans . $27,000 00 



Amount carried forward . . $27,000 00 



92 ANNUAL REPOKTS. 

Amount brought forward .... $27,000 00 

Debit. 
Property and debt balance, amount of funded 

debt renewed in 1888 . . . . 27,000 00 

STATE AID. 

Credit. 
State of Massachusetts, amount paid in 1888 

charged to State $3,943 00 

Debit. 
Cash, paid monthly pay rolls for aid . . . 3,943 00 

STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Credit. 
Taxes, amount assessed ..... 130,127 50 

Debit. 
Cash, paid State treasurer. State tax . . . 30,127 50 

STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS. — STATE AID. 

Credit. 
Cash, received of State Treasurer . . . $3,611 00 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1888, due from State Dec. 10, 

1889, to debit in account, 1889 . . 3,802 00 



$7,413 00 
Debit. 

Balance from 1887^ .... $3,470 00 
State Aid, amount paid in 1888 as per 

account 3,943 00 

$7,413 00 

STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS.— mDIGENT SOLDIERS 
AND SAILORS. 

Credit. 
Cash, received of State Treasurer . . . . $426 00 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1888, due from State Dec. 10, 

1889, to debit in account, 1889 . . 495 50 



Atnount carried forward .... $921 50 



APPENDIX TO TREASUKER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 93 

Amoicnt hrougld foricard .... 8921 50 

Debit. 

Balance from 1887 .... $415 00 

Indigent soldiers and sailors, one-half 

of amount j^aid in 1888, as per 

account ..... 506 50 

8921 50 



Debit. 

Cash, paid sundry persons amounts 

due them .... $195 00 
Balance to credit in account, 1888 . 320 10 



SUNDRY PERSOXS. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1887 $230 10 

Interest, coujjons due and unpaid . . . 285 00 



$515 10 



8515 10 



SALARIES. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed . . . $24,150 00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid Mark F. Burns, mayor . $1,000 00 

Charles E. Oilman, city clerk . 307 76 

George I. Vincent, " " '. 2,225 28 
John F. Cole, city treasurer and 

collector of taxes . . . 3,500 00 

Horace L. Eaton, city engineer . 2,200 00 

Selw\Ti Z. BoTTman, city solicitor, 1,167 75 

Thomas M. Durell, city physician, 950 00 

Douglas Frazar, city auditor . 450 00 
Charles S. Robertson, clerk of 

common council . . . 200 00 
George I. Vincent, clerk of as- 
sessors and committees . . 162 07 



Amounts carried foricard . . 812,162 86 124,150 00 



94 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . . $12,162 86 $24,150 00 

William P. Mitchell, assistant 
clerk of assessors and commit- 
tees . . . . . 1,400 00 

Jairus Mann, city messenger . 1,200 00 

Thomas R. Roulstone, superin- 
tendent of buildings and street 
lights 1,600 00 

James R. Hopkins, inspector of 

buildings .... 250 00 

Thomas Cunningham, inspector 

of milk 300 00 

Stillman H. Libby, assessor 650 00 

George W. Hadley, " . . 650 00 

Benj. F. Thompson, " . . 650 00 

George W. Bartlett, assistant as- 
sessor . . . , . . 250 00 

Dexter F. Bennett, assistant as- 
sessor ..... 250 00 

Hiram D. Smith, assistant asses- 
sor 250 00 

Samuel T. Richards, assistant as- 
sessor . . . . . 250 00 

Aaron Sargent, treasurer of com- 
missioners of sinking funds 

Harry Watson, assessors' clerk . 

John Kenney . . 

William H. Whit comb, janitor of 
City Hall and Public Library . 

C. G. Rowell, registrar of voters, 

S. G. A. Twycross, " " 

Otis H. Currier, " " 

George I. Vincent, " " 

Engineer's assistants . 

$23,145 61 

Excess and deficiency, balance to 

credit of account . . . 1,004 39 

$24,150 00 



50 


00 


25 


00 


25- 


00 


750 


00 


150 


00 


150 


00 


150 


00 


150 


00 


1,832 


75 



APPEXDTX TO TEEASUEEE AXD COLLECTOe's EEPOET. 95 

STREET LIGHTS. 

Credit. 

Apjjropriations, amount assessed . . . $16,000 00 

Cash, received of Charles Linehan, 

repairing lamp post . . $13 00 

J. AY. Marden, et al., lamp post, 20 00 

J. G. Tewksburv, et al., lamj) 

post 20 00 

53 00 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Somerville Electric Light 

Co., lighting by electricity . $9,449 43 

Chariest own Gas Co., lighting by 

gas 1,783- 80 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., light- 
ing by gas .... 1,938 61 

Wm. H. Archibald, lighting and 

care of lamps . . . 447 03 

Frank Moore, lig-htino- and care 

of lamps .... 452 40 

Patrick O'Connell, lighting and 

care of lamps . . . 735 15 

James Tevlin, lio-htino^ and care 

of lamps . . . . 511 20 

Thomas F. Casey, .lighting and 
care of lamps 

Samuel Walker & Co., oil . 

H. W. Raymond, chimneys, etc. 

Martin Thayer, wood, alcohol 

J. A. Durell, repairs, etc. . 

William B. Holmes, repairs, etc. 

Jacob Woodbury, " " 

W. O. Barbour, " " 

J. Q. Twombly, " " 

P. J. Dinn, " " 

Amounts carried for vKird 



$16,053 00 



184 80 




117 04 




99 46 




42 00 




51 75 




8 88 




1 50 




8 58 




75 




29 73 




815,862 11 


816,053 00 



96 



AN^NTTAL KE PORTS. 



Am ovnts carried fortoard . $15,862 11 

F. D. Chase, repairs, etc. . . 14 45 

Howe & Flint, " " . . 4 05 

Whitney & Snow, " " . . 1 65 

F. A. Chandler, " " . . 81 

Bishop &> Brother, ladders . . 5 43 

H. W. Burgess, chimneys . . 2 60 

John Fuller, lighting sticks . 1 75 
William B. Berry & Co., street 

signs ..... 26 00 

S . H. Libby, premium of insurance 10 00 

J. O. Hay den & Co., printing . 5 00 

E. R. Perham & Co., expressing, 90 

R. T. Blackwell, use of wagon . 6 00 

E. H. Bright, labor ... 12 38 



$16,053 00 



115,953 13 
Excess and deficiency, balance to 

credit of account . . . 99 87 



SIDEWALKS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
Sidewalk assessments, assessments levied 



Debit. 
Cash, paid laborers . . . . 
Jeremiah McCarthy, edgestones, 
Sanborn & Hatch, bricks . 
John Thresher, " 

J. O. Hay den & Co., advertising, 
Sewers account, catch-basin curbs. 
Highways account, labor . 
Sidewalk assessments, abatements 



$7,401 73 
Excess and deficiency, balance to 

credit of account . . . 791 96 







$16,053 00 






$4,500 00 


ned . 




3,693 69 




18,193 69 


$1,724 


66 




2,418 


37 




1,567 


30 




893 


03 




124 


05 




14 


37 




658 


00 




1 


95 





18,193 69 



APPEXDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 97 



SIDEWALK ASSESSMEXTS. 

Credit. 
Cash, received of sundry persons, as- 
sessments .... $4,164 91 
Sidewalks, abatements . . . 1 95 
Balance, to debit in account, 1889 . 2,093 17 



Debit. 
Balance from 1887 .... $2,566 34 
Sidewalks, assessments levied . . 3,693 69 



SEWERS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of Boston & Lowell 

Railroad Co., catch-basins 
Boston Consolidated Railroad, 

labor on manholes, etc. . 
Massachusetts General Hospital, 

annual fee for permission to 

enter Fitchburg Street sewer 
Dennis Ryan, puddling 
C. A. Mongan, " 
A. W. Bryne, " 
J. G. Sculley, ballast . 
Sidewalks account, catch-basin 

curbs ..... 



$68 92 
63 18 



50 00 
1 00 

13 94 
10 26 
22 20 

14 37 



, Sewer assessments, assessments levied . 

Excess and deficiency, balance to debit of acc't. 

Debit. 
Cash, paid laborers . . . . $6,340 39 
George D. Goodiich &> Co., drain 

pipe 2,902 06 

F. Wellington & Co., cement . 139 50 



86,260 03 



6,260 03 



$9,500 00 



243 87 

8,744 67 

657 19 

$19,145 73 



Amount carried forward . . |9,381 95 $19,145 73 



^8 



ANN^UAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Sanborn & Hatch, bricks 
John Thresher, " 

M. W. Sands, " 

John F. Ayer & Co., lumber 
A. Parker, catch-basin stones 
Seward Dodge, blacksmithing 
Osgood &j Hart, covers 
W. O. Barbour & Co., traps 
F. W. Gilbert, rubber boots 
H. W. Raymond, hardware 
Howe & Flint, " 

J. A. Durell, " 

Boston Woven Hose Co., repair- 
ing hose .... 
Robert Burlin, binding books 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery. 
City of Boston, water 
I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 
Thomas Casey, bricks 
Leander Greeley, ball and stopper 
J. O. Hayden <fe Co., printing 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
Morse & Whyte, sand screen 
Fox, McDormand & Co., ladder 
W. J. Miers, roofing pitch, etc. 
John Fisher, repairing tub, etc. 
A. M. Prescott, teaming 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co., manila, 
Somerville Sentinel, advertising 
D. A. Sanborn, mortar-bed . 
S. J. Wood, filing saws 
City of Cambridge, five ninths 
of expense of cleaning outlet, 
and repairing Bridge St. sewer, 
Charles A. Mongan, laying drain- 
pipe ..... 



,381 95 
234 80 

24 00 
9 00 

171 93 

424 00 

14 46 

41 67 

52 50 

67 50 

16 46 

5 15 

75 

20 00 

25 00 

26 50 

40 00 
4 46 

24 00 
1 05 

41 90 
24 28 



119,145 73 



50 
40 
00 

50 
75 
11 00 

22 25 

3 00 

25 



1,741 28 
6 51 



Amounts can ied forward . .$12,455 80 $19,145 73 



APPENDIX TO TREASUKEK AXD COLLECTOE's EEPOET. 99 

Amounts brought forward . . $12,455 80 $19,145 73 

Arthur W. Bryne, constmcting 

sewer in Highland Ave. . . 1,174 03 

Arthur W. Biyne, constructing 
-sewer in Cherry Street . . 76 24 

Arthur W. Bryne, constructing 
sewer in Cedar and Albion 
Streets 1,028 44 

Richard Falvey, constructing sew- 
er in Cedar and Albion Streets 1,758 68 

Dennis O'Connell, constructing 
sewer in Cedar and Albion 
Streets 1,052 42 

Christopher Burke, constructing 

sewer in Elm Street . . 1,270 31 

Christopher Burke, constructing 

sewer in Franklin Street . . 25 35 

Dennis Ryan, constructing sewer 

m Greenville Street . . . 194 21 

Dennis Ryan, constructing man- 
hole 40 00 

Dennis Ryan, labor on catch- 
basin ..... 5 75 

Maurice Buttimer, constructing 
sewer in Thurston Street 

Sewer assessments, abatements . 



51 20 
13 30 


$19,145 73 





SEWER ASSESSMENTS. 

Ceedit. 
Cash received of sundry persons, assessments . $6,261 37 
Sewers, assessments abated . . . . 13 30 

Balance, to debit in account 1889 . . . 6,908 87 



Debit. 
Balance from 1887 .... $4,438 87 
Sewers, assessments levied . . 8,744 67 



$13,183 54 



$13,183 54 



100 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 



Credit. 








Appropriations, amount assessed . 


. 


. 


$14,000 00 


Cash, received for support of paupers 








Of city of Boston 


. $397 


60 




" Cambridge . 


101 


01 




" Fall River . 


3 


25 




" Lowell 


33 


90 




" Lawrence . 


9 


35 




" Salem 


43 


10 




" Taunton . . 


8 


00 




Of town of Arlington . 


35 


60 




" Brookline . 


29 


50 




^' Groton 


11 


90 




"^ Leominster. 


20 


15 




" Manchester 


49 


50 




" Stoneham . 


26 


15 




" Sandwich . 


12 


40 




" Woburn 


60 


30 




State of Massachusetts, support of 








State paupers 


. . 579 


24 




Burial of State paupers 


30 


00 




Henry Coffin, aid to paupers 


326 


00 




Cyrus B. Austin, aid to paupers . 


4 


00 




P. E. Durant, guardian, aid to pauper 


3 108 


00 




Edward H. Gooding, " " 


76 


60 




0. S. Knapp, guardian, " " 


169 


92 




Cornelius Kelley, " " 


45 


00 




Hugh 0'l!^eil, 


10 


00 




B. Y. Russell, guardian, " " 


102 


60 


2,293 07 










$16,293 07 



Debit. 

Cash, paid for support of paupers, viz. : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts $844 17 
Carney Hospital .... 139 54 



Amounts carried forward 



$983 71 $16,293 07 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEE AXD COLLECTOE S EEPORT, 



101 



Amounts trough t forv:o 


'rd . 


. $983 71 $16,293 07 


Danvers Lunatic Hospital . 


. 1,087 29 


Massachusetts School* 


for the 


Feeble-minded 


. 


127 21 


Taunton Lunatic Hospital . 


212 63 


VV orcester Lunatic Hospital 


976 82 


VV orcester Insane Hospital . 


459 65 


VVestboro Insane Hospital . 


681 07 


John M. Fiske, House oJ 


Correc- 




tion 




17 00 


City of Boston . 




830 55 


" Cambridge 




18 10 


" Lowell . 




130 72 


" Maiden . 




37 85 


" Xewton . 




10 00 


" Taunton 




53 43 


Town of Hyde Park . 




37 20 


" Peabody . 




513 51 


Mary Burke, rent 




72 00 


Mary A. Blackwell, rent 




8 00 


Ira H. Bickford, " 




60 00 


Bridget Carroll, " 




5 00 


Susan Clifford, " 




40 00 


Julia Casey, " 




12 00 


Timothy F. Crimmings, i 


rent, 


48 00 


Ellen Driscoll, 




48 00 


Ellen Downey, 




10 00 


Edward Foster, 




48 00 


Thomas Flemmingr 




48 00 


Martha Fitzgerald, 




72 00 


Ann Grady, 




22 00 


Ann Gallagher, 




60 00 


Michael Grady, 




8 00 


Sarah Gill, 




72 00 


John I. Loudon, 




30 00 


Sarah McFarland, 




4 00 


John H. McFarland, 


'd 


84 00 


Amounts carried f one a/ 


$6,927 74 $16,293 07 



102 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . 


. 16,927 74 116,293 07 


John McGonagle, rent 




60 00 


John McNamara, " 




•. 20 00 


Jeremiah McCarthy, 


rent . 


50 00 


Owen McLaughlin, 


ii. 


44 00 


Ellen McCarron, 


tc 


48 00 


Mary O'Hare, 


(( 


48 00 


Charles H. O'Neil, 


(( 


48 00 


M. B. Pitman, 


t( 


12 00 


Emily E. Rice 


(( 


. 60 00 


George H. Simonds, 


it 


. 48 00 


James Snow, 


u 


21 00 


Maurice Terry, 


(( 


60 00 


Chester Williams, 


u 


24 00 


Mary Ash, board 


. 


120 00 


M. A. Blackwell, hoard 


42 01 


Annie Burns, " 


, 


6 86 


Alice B. Brower, " 


, 


6 57 


Wells H. Boynton, board . 


4 00 


John Earle, 


u 


96 00 


Ellen C. Eagan, 


ti 


95 92 


Henry Fern aid, 


ii 


4 29 


Sarah J. Hill, 


u 


144 00 


Flora Gray, 


u 


58 01 


Charles Hutchinson, 


li. 


52 30 


Ann Kelley, 


ii 


104 59 


Thomas Kilmartm, 


a 


6 00 


Hannah M. Mayo, 


a 


169 91 


Frederick J. Miller, 


(& 


. 60 00 


Ellen J^eagle, 


(C 


58 73 


Ellen M. O'Donnell, 


ii. 


104 59 


Eugene Shea, 


u 


130 69 


D. J. Sawin, 


u 


57 00 


Martin Toye, 


u 


52 30 


S. B. Carter, meals 


. 


9 00 


Charles S. Butters, groceries : 


md 


provisions 


• • 

card . 


38 00 


Amounts carried fort 


. $8,891 51 $16,293 07 



appe:n^dix to treasurer and collector's report. 103 

Amoimts brought forward . . 88,891 51 $16,293 07 

Charles Bartley, groceries and 

provisions . . . . 45 00 

A. F. Carpenter, groceries and 

provisions .... 145 50 

J. B. Eastman, groceries and pro- 
visions . . . . . 14 00 

J. J. Guild, groceries and provi- 
sions ..... 16 00 

D. E. Hennessey, groceries and 
provisions . . . . 68 50 

James Harris, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 26 00 

George H. Hills & Co., groceries 

and provisions . . . 478 61 

Knowles Bros., groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 66 00 

A. Munroe, groceries and provi- 
sions ..... 77 00 

Charles H. I*^orth & Co., grocer- 
ies and pro\dsions . . . 214 90 

Sturtevant Bros., groceries and 

provisions . . . . 80 00 

Frank H. Turner & Co., gro- 
ceries and provisions . . 33 01 

William S. Ward, groceries and 

provisions .... 370 50 

Albert Fiske, crackers . . 40 81 

Henry Gray, milk . . . 11 73 

Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel, 646 90 

J. E. Perkins, " 7 75 

E. B. Freeland, " 2 75 

E. R. Perham, " 4 10 

F. W. Estabrook, " 3 50 
S. M. Fuller, " 12 60 
Philip Eberle, boots and shoes . 102 30 
W. J. Emerson, " " . 1 50 



Amounts carried for tear d, . 811,360 47 $16,293 07 



104 



ANXUAL REPORTS. 



Amoim ts hr ought forward . 

F. W. Gilbert, boots and slioes, 

J. H. Mongan, " " 

J. H. Brooks, dry goods 

J. W. Brine, " 

Chas. F. Brine, " 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 

City of Cambridge, water rates 

A. S. Arnold, carpenter work 

Agnes Green, labor 

R. T. Blackwell, carriage bii'e 

George C. Bonner, carriage bire 

Wm. J. London, expressing 

Alfred E. Mann, services as un- 
dertaker 

Horace D. Runey, services as 
undertaker 

William A. Flaherty, services as 
undertaker 

P. H. Rafferty, services as un 
dertaker . 

Joseph J. Kelley, services as un- 
dertaker 

N. E. Telegraph and Telei3hone 
Co., tolls 

Charles C. Folsom, salary as 
agent .... 

Charles C. Folsom, disburse 
ments .... 

F. W. Kaan, salary as secretary 

W. D. Hay den, services 



$11,360 47 
34 35 
26 50 
33 55 

11 50 

2 00 
38 42 

5 00 

3 00 

6 00 
3 00 
2 00 

60 

50 15 

75 00 

30 00 

10 00 

10 00 

2 00 

1,200 00 

206 44 

250 00 

14 00 



$16,293 0' 



113,373 98 
Excess and deficiency, balance to 

credit of account . . . 2,919 09 



$16,293 0' 



APPEXDIX TO TEEASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 105 



SCHOOL FUEL. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 

Excess and deficiency, balance to debit of account 



Debit. 
Cash, paid B. F. Wild & Co., fuel . $3,836 05 
Horatio Wellington & Co. fuel . 3,276 69 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 8 50 



86,500 00 
621 24 

$7,121 24 



$7,121 24 



SCHOOL TEACHERS' SALARIES. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
City of Boston, water rates trans- 
ferred $50,412 57 

Cash, sundry j^ersons, salary not i:)aid 7 50 



Debit. 
Cash, paid salaries . . . . $85,700 66 
Excess and deficiency, balance to credit 

of account .... 4,719 41 



Am oiints carried f one ard^ 



$40,000 00 

50,420 07 
$90,420 07 



- 






SCHOOL COXTIXGEXT. 


« 


Credit. 






Appropriations, amount assessed 




$17,000 00 


Cash, received for tuition of non-resident 


pupils : — 




Alfred Bovson .... 


812 50 




B. H. Camp .... 


8 00 




Francis Hollis .... 


30 00 




Joseph Hollis .... 


10 00 




William S. McKenzie 


15 00 





875 50 817,000 OU 



106 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . 

P. Libby, janitor's salary not paid 

C. E. Meleney, injury to books 

Excess and deficiency, balance to debit 
of account . . . . 



S75 50 
3 33 
6 55 


117,000 00 
85 88 




766 22 



17,851 60 



Debit. 








Cash, paid Joshua H. Davis, salary as 








superintendent of schools 


- $750 


00 




Disbursements .... 


8 


81 




Clarence E. Meleney, salarj^ as 








superintendent of schools 


1,666 


67 




Disbursements .... 


35 


50 




Janitors ..... 


5,892 


13 




L. H. Snow, truant officer . 


800 


04 




" " " travelling expenses 


6 


00 




JairusMann, truant officer . 


49 


98 




Harrison Hume, books 


309 


38 




Boston School Supply Co.^ books 


527 


36 




Thorp & Adams Manuf'g Co., 








books ..... 


341 


15 




Harper & Bros., books 


373 


17 




Leach, Shewell <fe Sanborn, books 


318 


12 




Ginn & Co., books 


315 


89 




D. Appleton & Co., books . 


203 


02- 




B. A. Fowler & Co., " . 


200 


00 




Lee & Shepard, " 


230 


78 




Edward E.Babb <fc Co., books . 


451 


06 




D. C. Heath & Co., 


101 


38 




William Ware & Co., " 


161 


94 




Charles H. Whiting, '' 


141 


34 




Thompson, Brown & Co., " 


87 


26 




Houghton, Mifflin & Co., " 


57 


58 




F. M. Ambrose, " 


84 


50 




E. H. Butler & Co., 


67 


50 




Amounts carried forward . . 


113,180 


56 


117,851 60 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEPw AXD COLLECTOR'S EEPOET. 107 



Amounts hroiig?d foricard . 


.§13,180 56 


817,851 60 


A. S. Barnes & Co., books . 


56 25 




Cowperthwait & Co., " 


27 62 




Willard Small, " . 


11 34 




Interstate PublisMng Co., " . 


180 00 




Estes & Launat, " . 


5 00 




A. Lovell & Co., " . 


5 00 




Carl Schoenhoff, " . 


7 14 




Yan Antwerp, Bragg & Co., " . 


10 08 




Clark & Ma^Tiard, " 


10 08 




George F. King & Merrill, station- 






ery, etc., . . . . 


806 56 




M. R. Warren, stationery, etc.. 


2 00 




Thomas Groom & Co., " " 


6 60 




J. L. Hammett, supplies 


109 54 




Educational Publishing Co., sup- 






plies . . . . . 


2 10 




Frost & Adams, supplies . 


11 22 




Industrial Educational Associa- 






tion, sup2)lies . 


7 50 




George Frost & Co., supplies 


1 55 




H. Lattimer & Co., " . 


2 97 




J. S. Sopier, " . 


61 93 




A. G. Whitcomb, " . 


9 00 




George S. Perry, " . 


16 70 




Holden Book Cover Co., sup 






plies .... 


128 09 




Cyclostyle Co., " 


2 00 




Joseph W. Ri2:)ley, binding boot 


: 9 80 




Horatio A. Brooks, " " 


54 41 




P. Lynam & Sons, mats 


47 71 




R. Thompson, " 


22 50 




Murphy, Leavens & Co., feathe 






dusters, etc. . 


44 37 




Paine Furniture Co., furniture 


104 75 




Hallett & Da\ds, piano 


235 00 




Hopkins & FuUerton, furnitur( 


3 7 10 




Amounts canned forward . 


. 815,186 47 


817,851 60 



108 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts hrought forward . 


.$15,186 47 


$17,851 60 


Jackson Caldwell & Co., carpet 


? 




etc. .... 


12 71 




H. W. Raymond, hardware 


219 04 




Howe & Flint, " 


2 45 




Oscar F. Howe, brooms 


107 00 




D. A. Scott & Co., brooms . 


3 75 




W. L. Snow, hardware, etc. 


8 20 




Charles A. Holmes, " 


6 15 




J. A. Durell, 


15 




L. D. Miller, polish . 


8 00 




Wm. H. Kelley, janitors supplies 


1 50 




X. L. Pennock, " " 


1 30 




Stewart & Co., clay . 


5 25 




C. W. Clark, moulding boards, 


9 00 




Kilborn Whitman & Co., bookcase 


23 50 




J. Q. Twombly, signs . 


4 75 




Brine &N^orcr OSS, sewing supplies 


12 82 




N. D. Whitney & Co., " 


2 70 




Mary L. Boyd, " 


5 46 




Sarah E. Kilmer, supplies . 


10 00 




0. F. Page, janitor's supplies 


1 30 




George L. Baxter, disbursements. 


4 28 




H. L. Morse, " 


13 18 




John S. Hayes, " 


5 00 




George E. Nichols, " 


7 50 




H. D. Newton, " 


3 40 




G. A. Southworth, " 


5 02 




P. H. Stearns & Co., ribbon 


6 60 




M. W. Carr, travelling expenses, 


56 70 




J. 0. Hay den & Co., printing, etc., 


439 96 




N. S. Dearborn, " 


87 00 




C. A. French, filling diplomas 


50 05 




Publishers Somerville Citizen, ad- 






vertising .... 


6 00 




Somerville Sentinel, advertising 


6 00 




John M. Corse, post-office box 


3 00 




Amounts carried forward . . 


$16,325 19 


$17,851 60 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEPv AXD COLLECTOR S EEPOET. 



109 



Amounts hrou ght foricord . 

First M. E. Church, use of church 

Thomas Young, flowers 

H. M. Weld &, Co., carriage hire 

Chas. E. Farnham, expressing 

Wm. J. London, 

Barker & Tibbetts, 

Thorpe's exj^ress, 

E. Pi. Perham, 

Stilphen & Co., 

B. H. Weeks & Co., 

M. G. Staples, teaming 

Joseph Young, labor . 

S. A. CarvuU, 

D. H. Rinn, " 
Wm. H. Whitcomb, labor 

E. S. Daniels, tuning piano 

H. S. Brackett, carpenter work 
J. A. McLane, bill posting . 
Charlestown Gas Co., gas . 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Horatio Wellington &: Co., fuel 
City of Boston, water 
City of Cambridge, water . 
City of Lowell, board of truants 



816,325 19 
100 00 

6 85 
4 00 

3 30 

4 80 
31 25 
18 10 

7 40 

7 25 

5 35 
27 50 

4 25 

3 00 

8 00 
2 00 

6 00 
11 25 

4 00 
68 28 

130 38 

4 00 

730 70 

24 00 

314 75 



817,851 60 



$17,851 60 



SCHOOL-HOL^SE IXCIDEXTALS. 

Credit. 
Appropriation, amount assessed . 



Miscellaneous, transferred . 
Watering streets, " 



. 81,700 00 
. 1,000 00 



Cash, received of C. H. Guild, use of 
ward room .... 
F. X. Williams, old iron 



83 00 

8 81 



Excess and deficiency, balance to debit of account. 



810,000 00 



2,700 00 



11 81 
1,281 94 



813,993 75 



110 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought for loard 


• 


$13,993 75 


Debit. 






Cash, paid F. A. Chandler, carpenter 






work .... 


1777 


21 


Geo. W. Trefren, carpenter work. 


687 


50 


H. S. Brackett, ' 




315 


88 


S. & C. H. Williams, ' 




459 


92 


Stephen A. Howe, ' 




102 


14 


E. J. Cogan, ' 


^- 


606 


00 


Page & Littlefield, ' 




147 


35 


Leonard Arnold, ' 




33 


92 


A. S. Arnold, ' 




63 


80 


Gordon & Packard, ' 




40 


37 


Thomas Gordon, ' 




10 


96 


John R. Thompson, ' 




68 


72 


John D. Hills, ' 




84 


85 


Z. Flemming, ' 




10 


25 


F. C. Fuller, 




3 


10 


A. C. Winning, mason work 


348 


20 


D. P. Bucknam, " " 


191 


50 


D. A. Sanborn, " . " 


9 


43 


J. M. Burckes, " " 


7 


00 


John Kennedy, plastering . 


193 


15 


L. C. Seavey, slating . 


151 


55 


Dalton & Ingersoll, plumbing 


189 


80 


H. W. Covell & Co., " 


475 


60 


J. A. Durell, 


155 


59 


C. A. Legallee, " 


84 


82 


James F. Davlin, " 


77 


88 


W. H. Poole, 


8 


23 


Williams & Co., " 


173 


75 


Fred A. l^orris, painting 


160 


15 


J. Q. Twombly, 


119 


00 


Daniel McDermott, painting 


216 


79 


A. Fisher, " 


383 


30 


W. S. Walker, 


54 


85 


M. J. Goodwin, " 


85 


20 


Amounts carried forward . 


16,497 


76 113,993 75 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUPtER AXD COLLECTOR S REPOET. 



Ill 



Amounts brought for v:ard . 


16,497 76 


113,993 75 


F. J. Almeder, painting 


53 66 




W. P. Walker, " 


29 15 




J. C. Dyer, " 


28 87 




J. H. Hollis, 


33 05 




J. F. Burton, " 


23 55 




S. W. Fuller, lumber . 


118 15 




John F. Ayer & Co., lumber 


52 61 




George S. Perry, labor on black- 






boards ..... 


33 60 




J. C. Bell, labor on blackboards . 


380 55 




Ramsey Clark, labor on black- 






boards ..... 


4 00 




Jacob Woodbury, blacksmithing, 


13 55 




E. Onley, " 


1 00 




Seward Dodge, " 


2 80 




Charles A. Holmes, stove and fur- 






nace work .... 


179 92 




Howe & Flint, stove and furnace 






work ..... 


398 20 




W. B. Holmes, stove and furnace 






work ..... 


106 94 




J. A. Merrifield, stove and fur- 






nace work .... 


221 87 




George McDormand, stove and 






furnace work .... 


4 00 




A. A. Sanborn, steam fitting 


729 72 




Albert B. Franklin, " 


62 99 




H. W. Raymond, hardware 


54 76 




W. L. Snow, " 


345 67 




M. C. Warren & Co., hardware . 


1 53 




J. A. Durell, " 


5 00 




Somerville Iron Foundry, hard- 






ware ..... 


34 38 




Whitney & Snow, hardware 


32 59 




Wm. Hall & Co., 


3 19 




VV alker & Pratt, Manfg. Co., stove 


40 00 





Amounts carried forward 



19,493 06 113,993 75 



112 



ANJSrUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . 
Fred. S.Young, gas-fixtures 
J. L. Hammett, blackboards 
A. G. Whitcomb, desks, etc. 
W. H. Brine, bookcase 
Holland & Daniels, shades 
W. M. Durell, blinds 
W. H. Wood & Co., shingles 
E. B. Badger & Sons, gutters 
John L. Crafts, rope, etc. 
John C. Snow, stair rail 
W. M. Hadley, lime . 
Walter Bates, concreting 

C. E. Arnold, whitening 
Joseph Young, varnishing 
J. Turner & Co., stone work, 
H. A. Chick & Co., repairing 

chairs 
James M. Coburn, labor 
O. F. Page, 
James Deacon, 
Joseph Gott, 

D. H. Rinn, 
Owen Finnon, 

E. H. Bright, 
P. O'Connell, 
Anderson &} Schofield, labor 

D. Crocker, clocks and repamng 
Fred. C. Cutter, repau-ing clocks 
Henry C. Manning, " 
John E. Hill, 

E. R. Perham, expressing . 
Woodbridge & Co., expressing 
W. J. London, " 
Thorpe's Express, " 

M. G. Staples, " 

P. H. Wellcome, hack hire, 



89,493 06 

1 50 

206 85 

763 06 

16 00 

74 17 

75 

58 00 

73 00 

5 00 

25 00 

1 25 

1,525 14 

170 00 

7 50 

19 38 

1 10 
13 50 

5 75 
15 00 

1 50 

3 00 

6 00 
133 75 

27 00 

2 00 
76 00 
15 00 
12 10 

4 50 
12 85 
12 25 

75 

75 

50 

10 00 



$13,993 75 



Amounts carried forward . 



812,792 96 813,993 75 



APPEXDIX TO TREASUREE AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 113 



Amounts brought forward 

S. J. Wood, fitting keys, etc. 

Miss Winslow, curtains 

R. M. Johnson, removinoj niorht 
soil 

H. AY. Burgess, soda . 

James Cathburton, soda 

Wm. A. Muzzey, rent 

Geo. D. Wildes, " 

L. M. Jones, " 

H. Libbey & Son, rent 

George B. Haskell, " 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationeiy 

American Steam Boiler Insurance 
Co., premium of insurance 

Sewer assessment account, sewer 
in Highland Avenue 

Sidewalk assessment account, side- 
walk on Vinal Avenue 



812,792 96 
58 40 

2 40 

108 00 
1 00 

3 60 
75 00 
22 91 

225 00 

34 00 

100 00 

9 50 

446 25 

49 42 

65 31 



813,993 75 



SCHOOL-HOUSE IX WARD TWO. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1887 .... .$4,177 55 
Excess and deficiency, balance to debit 

of account ..... 725 95 



Debit. 

Cash, paid O. S. Knapp, attorney, land 
on Concord Square 



$13,993 



/o 



84,903 50 



$4,903 50 



SCHOOL-HOUSE IX WARD THREE. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1887 . 



$395 11 



114 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Arnoimt brought fonoard . . . $395 11 

Debit. 

Cash, paid E. Shapleigh, carpenter 

work ..... $46 04 
Police Station, incidentals trans- 
ferred 349 07 

$395 11 



SCHOOL-HOUSE IN WARD FOUR. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1887 .... $25048 

Debit. 
Cash, paid E. Shapleigh, carpenter 

work $46 03 

Police Station incidentals, trans- 
ferred 204 45 

$250 48 



TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1887 1170,000 00 

Cash, borrowed by authority of the City Council 
on city notes as follows : viz., — 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts on eight months, at 4i 
percent .... $200,000 00 

Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, 
on six months, at 3| per 
cent 30,000 00 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, on six months, at 4 
per cent .... 20,000 00 



Amounts carried forward . $250,000 00 $170,000 00 



APPEXDIX TO TPvEASUEEE AXD COLLECTOR'S EEPOET. 115 

Amoimts hrougld forward . 8250,000 00 -SITO.OOO 00 

Commonwealtli of Massachu- 
setts, on six montlis, at 4 
per cent .... 50,000 OU 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, on six months, at 4 
per cent .... 50,000 00 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, on six months, at 4 
per cent .... 20,000 00 

8370,000 UO 



Debit. 

Cash, paid as follows : \dz., — 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, note dated Dec. 13, 
1887 $50,000 00 

F. S. Moseley & Co., note 

dated Dec. 14, 1887 . . 25,000 00 

F. S. Moseley & Co., note 

dated Sept. 14, 1887 . 25,000 00 

F. S. Moseley & Co., note 

dated Sept. 14, 1887 . 20,000 00 

F. S. Moseley & Co., note 

dated Sept. 30, 1887 . 25,000 00 

Blake Brothers & Co., note 

dated Dec. 31, 1887 . . 25,000 00 

Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, note dated March 13, 
1888 .'.... 200,000 00 



8370,000 00 
Balance to credit in account 1889, 170,000 00 



8540,000 00 



$540,000 00 



116 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TAXES. 



Credit. 



Cash, received for taxes for 188*2 

^' 1884 

'^ 1885 

'' 1886 

'^ 1887 

^' 1888 



$•26 02 

30 37 

60 60 

127 32 

36,624 64 

61,049 24 

321,743 40 



Real-estate liens, titles to the city for non-pay- 
ment of taxes of 1886 . . . , 



Overlay and abatement : — 

Abatements on taxes for 1882 

" 1833 

- 1884 
'' 1885 

- 1887 
" 1888 



13,188 06 

3,918 39 

4 00 

10 00 

511 26 

415 40 

2,911 20 



Balance to debit in account 1889 — 

Being uncollected taxes for 1884 $4,010 02 

" " 1885 5,173 04 

'' 1886 5,282 90 

'' " 1887 39,956 12 

"■ 1888 96,804 00 



Debit. 

Balance from 1887 
Apj)ropriations, amount assessed 

for current expenses . 
State of Massachusetts, amount 

assessed for State tax 



$160,407 40 
371,337 34 

30,127 50 



8419,661 59 
20 02 



10,958 31 



151,226 08 



$581,866 00 



Amounts carried forward . $561,872 24 $581,866 00 



APPEXDIX TO TEEASUEEP AXD COLLECTOE S EEPOET. 



117 



Amovnts hrought foi'icnrd . 8561,872 24 S581,86i3 00 
County of ^Middlesex, amount as- 
sessed for county tax . 16,906 92 
Overlay and abatement, amount 

added by the assessors . 3,086 84 

85>'1.866 <)•'> 



WATER SERVICES. 





Ceedit. 




Cash, received of Joseph 


Balch. ser- 




vice pipe, etc. 


. 


812 15 


William E. Bailey, s 


ervice pipe. 




etc. 


. 


18 75 


R. P. Benton, service 


pipe, etc. . 


33 31 


E. E. Da^ds, 


C( (.(. 


12 22 


Patrick Farrell. 


'" 


5 10 


D. Follett, 


" 


10 50 


George Fitz, 


• . 


6 48 


C. R. Goodrich, " 


(c a 


12 99 


' Charles J. Heald, - 


cc a 


12 00 


Edward Hartshorn, s< 


BrA'ice pipe. 




etc. 


. . . 


11 76 


L. P. Hollander, sei-^-ice pipe. etc. 


28 12 


John D. Hills, 


ib ii. 


10 80 


Alson Knight, '• 


cc u 


10 00 


George Lattimore, " 


!.<. (.(. 


11 01 


William Lvnch, 


.i. i(, 


5 00 


A. L. Love joy, " 


u u 


42 00 


Alexander ^liller, '^ 


u u 


10 00 


John Medina, " 


u a 


5 52 


Christojjher Martis, " 


u u 


2 90 


0. H. Perry & Co., " 


a u 


19 85 


George S. Phillips, " 


ti a 


9 55 


J. A'. Porter, " 


u u 


3 5U 


Hazen Sturtevant, " 


a u 


9 74 


George H. S alia way, s 


ervice pipe, 




etc . 


• 


7 00 



Amounts carried forward 



8310 25 



118 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forioarcl 
Daniel C. Stillson, service pipe 
. etc. .... 

John Swan, service pipe, etc. 
F. L. Temple, old pipe 
Hiram L. White, pipe, etc. 
William Yomig, " " . 
Luther Reed, repairs . 
Simeon F. Robinson, pipe, etc. 
Miner Van Dusen, " " 
Q. A. Yinal, fittings . 
N. M. Lowe, " 
Watering streets account, labor 
etc. .... 



Water service assessments, pipes laid, 
cost of services 



1310 25 



13 


75 


10 


80 


23 


28 


7 


53 


15 


90 


2 


50 


28 


30 


11 


00 


4 


60 


23 


40 


30 


03 



$481 34 

7,461 95 $7,943 29 



Debit. 






Cash, paid laborers .... 


$2,668 


63 


Boston Lead Manufacturing Co., 






lead pipe . . . . 


216 


96 


George K. Paul & Co., iron pipe 


1,330 


47 


Sumner & Goodwin, fittings 


587 


75 


Fred H. Hilton & Co., " 


1,07.3 


86 


W. H. Ward & Co., " 


33 


75 


Stults & Mansur " 


15 


34 


Chapman Valve Manufacturing 






Co., fittings . . . 


33 


32 


Henry McShane & Co., fittings . 


68 


69 


Dalton & Ligersoll, fittings 


8 


67 


Hoffman & Billings, " ; . 


6 


00 


Davis &> Farnum Manuf'g. Co., 






service boxes .... 


625 


46 


Gilchrist & Gorham, tools . 


6 


50 


A. J. Wilkinson & Co., " . 


22 


72 


Amounts carried forward . 


16,698 


12 $7,943 29 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



119 



AmovnU brought forvmrd , 
Walworth Manuf g. Co., pipe fit- 
tings, etc. .... 
John H. Stevens & Co., hydrant 
fittings, etc., .... 
Somerville Iron Foundry Co., 

castings .... 
American Tube Works, tubes 
John S. Rice &> Co., tank . 
Hernias Strater & Sons, pump 
Boston Bolting Co., hose, etc., 
Boston Woven Hose Co., hose, etc 
Henry McShane & Co., hose bibs 
Boston Bolt Co., bolts, etc. 
.James Grundy & Co., repairing 

pump .... 
Hall Rubber Co., rubber mittens 
W. L. Snow, hardware 
H. W. Raymond, " . 
George H. Mason, " . 
Wm. T. Henderson, wagon 
Richard Dowd, plumbing . 
Henry C. Folgier, " 
Charles A. Holmes, " 
William B. Holmes, " 
S. J. Wood, key 
Barker &> Tibbetts, expressing 
Chas. E. Farnham, " 

Hannah W. Brooks, damages 



,698 12 .$7,943 29 



582 92 



1 25 



1 


84 


15 


50 


7 


00 


4 


55 


39 


32 


'., '^ 


00 


)s 25 


58 


38 


23 


y 

2 


18 


s 5 


13 


11 


30 


, 


79 


2 


75 


175 


00 


5 


50 


2 


05 


3 


14 


2 


50 


. 


25 


5 


55 


. 


50 


12 


25 



Water maintenance, 
transferred 



balance 87,593 20 
350 09 



WATER SERVICE ASSESSMEXTS. 

Credit. 
Cash received of sundry persons for 

water services . . . 87,077 66 

Balance to debit in account, 1889 1,746 02 



-s7,943 29 



^8,823 68 



120 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

Debit. 

Balance from 1887 

Water services, service pipes laid 

in 1888 . . , . . . 

WATER MAINTENANCE. 

Credit. 



$8,823 OS 



. $1,361 73 



7,461 95 



Debit. 

Cash, paid laborers .... $9,719 06 
Nathaniel Dennett, salary as Su- 
perintendent . . . . 1,500 00 
Disbursements . . . . 19 00 



^,823 68 



Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash received of the .town of Arling- 




$19,000 


00 


ton, clamps, etc. 
Seward Dodge, wagon 


$12 30 
30 00 






Charles F. Davis, repairing hy- 
drant . . 


16 00 






Davis & Farnum Manuf. Co., old 








iron ..... 


20 02 






Somerville Iron Foundry Co., old 
iron . . 


9 50 






Somerville Electric Light Co., 








damages .... 


10 00 






Highways account, setting foun- 
tain ..... 


37 28 






Miscellaneous account, thawing 








pipe at City Hall 

Chas. J. Simpson, part cost of lay- 
ing pipe ..... 

Water services, transferred 


56 05 

100 00 
350 09 


641 


24 






^^ 




$19,641 


24 



Amounts carried forward . $11,238 06 $19,641 24 



APPENDIX TO TREASUREPv AND rOLLli:CTOR S REPORT. 



121 



AraountH hrovgld forvard 
Frederic W. Stone, salary as 

Clerk . . . / . 

Dishursements . . . . 

Chapman Valve Manufacturing 

Co., gates . . . . 

Davis & Farnum Manufacturing 

Co., ca'^tings . . . . 

Boston Lead Manufacturing Co., 

lead . . . . . 

Boston Belting Co., washers, etc. 
Watson & Bishee, jjlugs 
Samuel Oshorn & Co., steel 
Whittier Machine Co., repairing 

gate . . . . . 

Holyoke Hydrant and Iron-works, 

repairing hydrants . . 

Boston Woven Hose Co.,wrenches 
Boston Bolt Co., clamps 
Whitney & Crowther, use of boiler 
Pond, Steele & Hanson, boiler . 
Fulton Iron Foundry Co., kettle . 
Edson Manufacturing Co., jjump 
Walworth Manufacturing Co., 

pump .... 
Somerville Iron Foundry, clamps 
Jaques Brothers, patterns 
Randall, Goodale & Co., jjacking 
I. H. Brown & Co., molding 
Miller & Shaw, blocks 
R. Warner & Co., pails 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co., cord- 



age 



Union Glass Co., lantern glasses . 
George H. Mason &, Co., lantern . 
C. S. Harris, gas burners 
Gujjtell & Steers, tools 



$11,288 0(3 SH),641 24 



200 00 



6i 



41 82 



HOo 50 



204 


87 


36 


24 


9 


00 



6 80 
25 95 

29 61 
5 00 
1 50 
9 00 

12 75 

5 75 
9 84 

7 85 
180 55 

58 70 

9 87 

76 

10 93 
1 50 

22 95 
20 35 

6 25 
3 00 

7 09 



Amounts carried foncard 



$18,085 86 $19,641 24 



122 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Aruounts brought forioard 


$13,035 86 


$19,641 24 


Elliott, Barnes & Co., leather 


5 00 




Samuel Walker & Co., oil . 


29 97 




H. W. Raymond, hardware 


109 35 




Whitney & Snow, " 


40 22 




W. L. Snow, • " 


12 57 




Charles A. Holmes, " 


4 98 




A. J. Wilkinson & Co., hardware 


s 5 44 




Dodge, Haley & Co., " 


17 02 




S. W. Fuller, lumber 


67 57 




Carter & Haskell, brooms, 


2 13 




Geo. H. Sampson, powder . 


41 04 




Brown & Call, repairing wagon 


13 20 




H. Stewart, wagon 


135 00 




Geo. D. Goodrich, drain pipe 


91 




N. E. Fitz & Co., cement . 


2 75 




L. G. Burnham & Co., cement. 


2 90 




HaU & Welch, horse . 


175 00 




Spencer Child, use of horse 


38 00 




H. WelUngton & Co., fuel 


302 87 


• 


J. J. Underbill 


66 50 




J. A. Porter & Co., " 


11 50 




City of Boston, water 


14 00 




Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 


25 25 




Charlestown Gas Co., " 


13 88 




James E. Whitaker & Co., hay . 


260 53 




Charles B. Edgerlj^, grain . 


99 00 




Fulton O'Brion, " . ' . 


65 48 




R. W. Willey & Co., " . . 


91 50 




A. M. Prescott, " 


6 32 




E. S. Conant, salt 


6 00 




Mrs. Yan Dusen, filling 


11 50 




New^ England Telephone and 






Telegraph Co., rentals and 






tolls 


80 30 




Thomas Groom & Co., stationery, 


11 70 




Hooper, Lewis & Co., " 


1 25 


1 


Amounts carried for tear d 


$14,806 49 


$19,641 24 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 123 



AraovMts hrought forward 

J. O. Hayden & Co., printing, etc. 

J. H. Brooks, duck 

D. H. Smith, " 
Geo. H. Cowdin, drugs 
Thomas Hollis, " 
L. Albert Smith, " 

.1. McCarthy & Sons, charcoal 
Charles R. Simpson, veterinary 

services .... 
J. F. Heffei-man, pasturage, 
J. H. Mongan, rubber boots 
Philip Eberle, " " . 

Jeremiah McCarthy, teaming 
John Walsh, " 

Steele & Webster, " 

Thorpe's Express, expressing 
Barker &. Tibbetts, " 
W. J. London, " 

George T. Day, " 

E. R. Perham, " 
Crane & Wood, premium of in 

surance .... 
M. G. Staples, teaming 
Timothy O'Brien, horseshoeing 
Charles Maguire, " 

Seward Dodge, blacksmithing 
Oliver Williams, " 

John Kellogg, " 

E. Spalding, harness work 

D. J. Bennett, " " 
W. B. Holmes, plumbing 

E. H. Buxton, painting 
S. J. Wood, filing saws 
Sundry persons, reporting leaks 
Mrs. Magee, compensation for 

damages . 



.fl4,806 

22 

2 

3 



6 

1 

19 

35 

12 

20 

3 

34 

4 

78 

1 

1 

1 



20 
3 

61 

17 

90 
3 
4 

28 
8 

31 
7 
2 

31 



49 
70 
50 
50 
45 
50 
00 
25 

25 
00 
50 
50 
50 
50 
63 
15 
65 
50 
25 
25 

00 
40 
25 
51 
73 
25 
10 
15 
50 
74 
00 
00 
00 



$19,641 24 



2 00 



Amounts carried forvmrd 



S15,372 70 819,641 24 



124 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts hr ought forward^ %\l 

Mrs. E. A. Warner, compensation 

for damages . . . - . 
Dennis Ryan, compensation for 

damages ..... 
Patrick McGrath, compensation 

for damages .... 
George J. Flitner, compensation 

for damages • . . 

A. C Winning, paid by him for 

damages . 
Richard Dowd, paid by him for 

damages ..... 



,372 70 


$19,641 24 


2 50 




10 00 




50 00 




115 00 




10 00 




10 00 





115,570 20 
Excess and deficiency, balance to credit 

of account .... 4,071 04 



119,641 24 



W^ATER-WORKS EXTENSION. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrow- 
ing on funded debt account . . . 125,000 00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid laborers .... |6,195 49 
Chapman Yalve Manufacturing 

Co., gates and hydrants . . 1,323 56 
R. D. Wood & Co., iron pipe . 8,492 78 
George K. Paul & Co., pipe . 123 42 
Boston Lead Manuf'g Co., lead . 529 61 
Chadwick Lead Works, '' . 26 35 
Somerville Iron Foundry, cast- 
ings . . . . . 314 64 
Davis & Farnum Manufacturing 

Co., castings .... 801 01 



Amounts carried forward .$17,806 86 $25,000 00 



/ 



APPENDIX TO TPvEASUEER AND COLLECTOk's REPORT. 125 



Amounts brought forir.ard 


.817,806 


86 $25,000 00 


Holyoke Hydrant & Iron Works 


? 




hydrant .... 


33 


00 


Whittier Machine Co., gate 


14 


25 


Boston Bolt Co., bolts 


28 


53 


John P. Downey, granite . 


50 


54 


S. W. Fuller, lumber . 


79 


30 


John F. Ayer & Co., lumber 


6 


74 


Sewall & Day Cordage Co., pack- 






ing .... 


25 


67 


X. E. Fitz & Co., wharfage 


73 


31 


A. W. Bryne, excavating . 


195 


20 


George McKenna, teaming 


48 


00 


Steele & Webster, " 


379 


51 


John Walsh, " 


22 


50 


M. G. Staples, "• 


11 


13 


J. 0. Hay den, paid by him foi 






freight .... 


564 


35 



$19,338 89 



Balance to credit of account 1889, 5,661 11 



$25,000 00 



. WATERING STREETS. 



Credit. 



Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of abutters . 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Frank Buttimer, watering, 
T. F. Crimmings, 
Owen Cunningham, 
John P. Downey, 
Charles Faulkner, 
John F. Elkins, 



Amounts carried foricard . , $2,062 26 



$3,500 00 
5,710 46 

89,210 46 



$410 17 




333 10 




362 23 




234 26 




405 25 




317 25 




^2,062 26 


$9,210 46 



126 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 




Amounts brought forvmrd 


$2,062 26 


$9,210 46 


Henry Gray, watering, 


399 70 




Henry McAvoy, " . . 


377 10 




George McKenna, " . . . 


450 90 




Abigail O'Brine, "... 


363 n40 




A. M. Prescott, " . . . 


438 82 




John Walsh, " . . 


493 30 




Boston Woven Hose Co., hose . 


40 64 




S. D. Hicks & Son, repairing cart. 


2 00 




Seward Dodge, repairing carts . 


70 21 




L. A. Wright, " " 


7 10 




Charles T. Southwick, repairing 






carts ..... 


3 45 




Estate of John Leland, repairing 






carts . . . . . 


22 80 




Whitney & Snow, hardware 


1 46 




E. Spalding, strap 


1 00 




F. H. Flagg, repairs . 


50 




W. H. Miller, watering cart 


365 00 




John E. Stevens, painting . 


135 55 




Thomas Groom & Co., stationery. 


4 50 




J. 0. Hay den & Co., advertising. 


13 30 




McDonnell Bros. " 


4 50 




C. E. Farnham, expressing 


50 




Robert Farrell, labor . . . 


38 00 




City of Boston, water 


2,777 92 




Water Service Account, stand 






pipes, etc. 


30 03 





$8,103 94 
School-House Incidentals transferred, 1,000 00 
Excess and deficiency, balance to 

credit of account . . . 106 52 



),210 46 



APPEXDIX TO TEEASUREK AXD COLLECTOE S KEPORT. 



12" 



TABLE D. 
BALANCES DECEMBER 31, 1888. 

$20,101 85 



Cash .... 

Excess and deficiency . 

Funded debt . • . 

Hose-house in Ward Four 

Overplus on tax sales 

Public property 

Property and debt balance 

Real estate liens . 

State of Massachusetts, State aid 

State of Massachusetts, indigent 

soldiers and sailors . 
Sidewalk assessments 
Sewer, assessments 
Sundry persons 
Temporary loans . 
Taxes .... 
Water sei*vice assessments 
jWater works extension . 



1,287,023 44 

335 58 
3,802 00 

•495 50 
2,093 17 

6,908 87 



151,226 08 
1,746 02 



$3,139 13 

860,500 00 

7,486 60 

102 13 

426,523 44 



320 10 
170,000 00 



5,661 11 



a,473,732 51 §1,473,732 51 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



CITY OF SOMffRVILLE. 



In Boaed of Aldermen, 
Feb. 28, 1889. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in tlie annual 
reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEO. I. VINCENT, Clerk, 



In Common Council, Feb. 28, 1889. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual 
reports, in concurrence. ' 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1888. 



ITox. MARK F. BURXS, ]S[ayor, Chairman, ex-officio. 

GEORGE O. PROCTOR, President of the Common Council, ex-officio. 



WARD ONE. 

S. NEWTOX CUTLER, Pearl Street . 
HORACE C. WHITE, M.D., Perkins Street 
H. P. HEMEXWAY, M.D., Perkins Street . 



Term expires 1888. 

" " 1889. 

" 1890. 



WARD TWO. 

ALPHOXSO H. CARVILL, M.D., Bow Street 
JAMES F. BEARD, Prospect Hill Avenue . 
CHARLES I. SHEPARD, Yinal Avenue . 



Term expires 1888. 
" 1889. 
" 1890. 



WARD THREE. 

XORMAX TV. BIXGHAM, School Street . 
Q. E. DICKERMAX, Highland Avenue 
WILLIAM P. HILL, Sycamore Street . 



Term expires 1888. 
" 1889. 
" 1890. 



WARD FOUR. 

Prof. BEXJ. G. BROWX, Professors' Row 
H. P. MAKECHXIE, M.D., Elm Street 
MARTIX W. CARR, Craigie Street 



Term expires 1888. 

" 1889. 

" " 1890. 



J. H. Davis, Superintendent and Secretary until May 1st, 1888. 
15 Myrtle Street, East Somerville. 

C. E. Melexet, 55 Columbus Avenue. 

OflS.ce hours, at Public Library, from 4 to 5 p. m., each day that the 
schools are in session. 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1888. 



Higfi School — MKSSns. WHITE,' BROWN, CARVILL, BINGHAM, DICKERMAN, 
BEARD, MAKECHNIE, CUTLER. 

Schools in East Somerville Z>is^rict — Messrs. CUTLER, HEMENWAY, WHITE, 

Mayor BURNS. 
Schools in Prospect Hill District — Mi&ssus, BEARD, CARVILL, SHEPARD. 
Schools in Winter Hill District — Messrs. DICKERMAN, HILL, BINGHAM. 
Schools in Spring Hill District — Missus. CARR, MAItECHNIE, PROCTOR. 
Schools in West Somerville District — Missus. BROWN, CABR, MAKECHNIE. 
Rules and Regulations — Messrs. CUTLER, SHEPARD, HILL, CARR. 
Examination of Teachers —Messrs. HEMENWAY, CARVILL, BROWN, 
Text Books — Messrs. SHEPARD, HILL, CARR, HEMENWAY, BINGHAM, 
BEARD, WHITE. 

Jfwsic — Messrs. BINGHAM, MAKECHNIE, BEARD, CUTLER. 

Evening Schools —Messrs. DICKERMAN, BROWN, SHEPARD, CUTLER. 

Drawing and Penmanship — Messrs. MAKECHNIE, DICKERMAN, CUTLER, 

SHEPARD. 

Approval of Private Schools — Messrs. BEARD, BROWN, DICKERMAN, CUTLER. 

School Supplies — Messrs. CARVILL, CARR, HILL. 

i^mance — Messrs. CARR, BINGHAM, BEARD. 

^a^aries — Messrs. BROWN, CARR, HEMENWAY, HILL, CARVILL. 

Repairs and Heating Apparatus — Messrs. HILL, CUTLER, MAKECHNIE 

BEARD, PROCTOR. 

Additional School Accominodations — Mayor BURNS, Messrs. PROCTOR, 

CARVILL, 

BROWN, WHITE, HILL. 

J^-we?— Messrs. PROCTOR, MAKECHNIE, CARVILL. 

Examination of First Class — Messrs. DICKERMAN, BROWN, CUTLER, CARVILL. 

Examination of Second CZass — Messrs. BINGHAM, CARR. 

Examination of Third CZass — Messrs. HILL, HEMENWAY. 

Examination of Fourth C^ass — Messrs. SHEPARD, MAIiECHNIE. 

Examination of Fifth C Zeiss — Messrs. BEARD, PROCTOR. 

Examination of Sixth Class — Messrs. WHITE, MAKECHNIE. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1889. 



Hox. CHAPtliES G. POPE, Mayor, Chairman, ex-officio. 

ALBERT W. EDMAXDS, President of the Common Council, ex-officio. 



TVARD ONE. 

HORACE C. WHITE, M.D., 149 Perkins Street . 
H. P. HEMEXWAY, M.D., 143 Perkins Street . 
S. NEWT0:N" CUTLER, 28 Flint Street . 



Term expires 1889. 
" 1890. 
" 1891. 



WARD TWO. 

JAMES F. BEARD, IT Prospect Hill Avenue 
CHARLES L SHEPARD, 33 Yinal Avenue 
ALPHONSO H. CARYILL, M.D., 18 Bow Street 



Term expires 1889. 
" 1890. 
" 1891. 



WARD THREE. 

Q. E. DICKERMAN, Highland Avenue 
WILLIAM P. HILL, Sycamore Street 
NORMAN W. BINGHAM, 235 School Street 



Term expires 1889. 
" 1890. 
" 1891. 



WARD FOUR. 

H. P. MAKECHNIE, M.D., 238 Elm Street . Term expires 1889. 

MARTIN W. CARR, Craigie Street . . . '' " 1890- 

MRS. ADDIE B. UPHAM, 21 Nevrbury Street . " " 1891. 

CiiAKEi!fCE E. Melexey, Superintendent and Secretary. 

55 Columbus Avenue. 



Office hours, at Public Library, from 4 to 5 p.m., each day that the 
schools are in session. 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1889. 



High ^c/<oo? — Messrs. CARVILL, BINGHAM, DICKERMAN, BEARD, CUTLER, 

MAKECHNIE, WHITE, CARR. 
Schools 171 East Somerville BistHct — M^ssTis. HEMENWAY, WHITE^, CUTLER. 
Schools in Prospect Hill District — Messbs. CARVILL, SHEPARD, BEARD, 

MAYOR POPE. 
Schools in Winter Hill District — 'M.^ss:rs. HILL, BINGHAM, DICKERMAN. 
Schools in Spring Hill District — Messhs. CARR, MAKECHNIE, EDMANDS. 

Schools in West Somerville District — Dr. MAICECHNIE, Mrs. UPHAM, 

Mr. CARR. 

Hules and Eegulations-MT^ssns. CUTLER, SHEPARD, HILL, CARR. 

Examination of Teachers — J)^. CARVILL, Mrs. UPHAM, Dr. HEMENWAY. 

Text-Books — Messrs. HILL, CARR, HEMENWAY, BINGHAM, BEARD, 
WHITE, SHEPARD. * 

Jfusic — Messrs, MAKECHNIE, BEARD, CUTLER, BINGHAM. 

Evening Schools — M^ss^s. SHEPARD, CUTLER, CARR, DICKERMAN. 

Drawing and Penmanship — M:esstxs. DICKERMAN, CUTLER, SHEPARD, 

MAKECHNIE. 

Industrial Education — Mes&b,s. CARR, CUTLER, SHEPARD, HILL, 

MAKECHNIE, Mrs. UPHAM. 

Approval of Private Schools — Mrs. UPHAM, Messrs. DICKERMAN, BEARD. 
School Supplies — Messrs. WHITE, CARR, HILL, CARVILL. 
i^mance — Messrs. BINGHAM, CARR, BEARD. 
Salaries — M:ess:rs. HEMENWAY, HILL, CARVILL, CARR. 

Repairs and Heating Apparatus — Mis.ssns. BEARD, MAKECHNIE, HEMENWAY, 

HILL. 

Additional School Accotnmodations — Mayor POPE, Messrs. EDMANDS, 

CARVILL, WHITE, HILL. 

FweZ— Messrs. EDMANDS, MAKECHNIE, CARVILL. 

Examination of Ninth Class — Messrs. CARR, BINGHAM, SHEPARD, 

HEMENWAY. 
Examination of Eighth Class— Messrs. MAKECHNIE, CARVILL. 
Examination of Seventh CZass — Messrs. BEARD, EDMANDS. 
Examination of Sixth Class— Messrs. WHITE, MAKECHNIE. 
Examination of Fifth CZass— Messrs. CUTLER, HILL. 
Examination of Fourth Class — Mr. DICKERMAN, Mrs. UPHAM. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



The School Committee make an exception, this year, to the 
usual custom of presenting the Report of the Superintendent of 
Schools as the Annual Report of the Board ; and, in accordance 
with a vote passed at the December meeting, respectfully present 
the following as the Annual Report for the year 1888. 

The School Committee, by the City Charter, is entrusted with 
the care and management of the Public Schools. 

The City Council, appreciating the importance of this trust, 
have appropriated one third of the entire tax levy for its main- 
tenance, and they are justified in expecting results equally gener- 
ous and correspondingly satisfactory. 

As a report of the management of this trust, we take pride in 
presenting the present condition of the schools throughout the 
city, with the hope that the citizens will not only read the printed 
reports of theories and tabulated facts, but ^ill visit the schools, 
and, from personal knowledge, be able to advise and co-operate 
with the Committee in their improvement. , 

All the departments of our growing city are in the midst of 
important changes. The spirit of the age, that demands such 
improvements as the electric light, the police signal system, and 
improved convenience for travel and communication for the city, 
is equally exacting in the line of school work. Methods, mate- 
rial, and conditions are the subjects of constant thought and trial, 
with a view to better results by a wise and more economical 
expenditure of the valuable time and energy of school life. 

The old is constantly called upon to give way for the new. To 
many the old is precious from association and experience. Con- 
servatism and economy, with the teachers as well as among thq 
citizens, hold tenaciously to old methods and material, that have 
served their own purpose so well, and Usten with incredulity to 
any plans that suggest change, even for improvement. Although 



136 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

it is the policy of the Board to try no experiments, nor trifle with 
the valuable trusts committed to their charge, yet some changes 
are being gradually made that the experience of other municipali- 
ties, similarly situated, have proved to be useful and desirable. 
In some cases the benefits will not be immediately apparent, 
for, even after a change has been made by the Board, it is intro- 
duced very slowly, and nothing radical is allowed to interrupt 
the progress of the schools. 

By the resignation of Mr. Joshua H. Davis, the city lost the 
valued services of a sujDerintendent whose long employment in 
the interest of her schools had made him intimate with the wants 
and conditions of every department of the work and section of 
the city. He had a personal acquaintance, not only with all the 
teachers, but many of the scholars. This knowledge was inval- 
uable to the Board, in the consideration of many of the questions 
of detail which are constantly before them. His policy was ever 
to hold fast to that which had proved valuable to the pupils, and 
await the experience of others before adopting changes that were 
urged upon his consideration. The general satisfactory condi- 
tion of the schools as he left them, show him to have been well 
abreast of the times in all educational lines of thought and prac- 
tice. We take pleasure in paying tribute to his eflicient and 
progressive administration. His genial and courteous manner 
will ever be remembered by his associates in the school work of 
the city. In him the scholars had a warm friend, and the exam- 
ple of a consistent Christian gentleman. With his farewell 
report, we appropriately close the first volume of our school 
history as a city. 

At the February meeting, the Board unanimously elected, as 
the successor of Mr. Davis, Mr. Clarence E. Meleney, of Pater- 
son, N^. J., in accordance with the recommendation of a commit- 
tee appointed to nominate a Superintendent of Schools ; and we 
feel certain that his first annual report, as herewith submitted, 
\\dll be read with interest, and that the action of the Board will 
be endorsed by the citizens, who will feel that the schools are in 
good hands, and under a wise and progressive management. He 
comes to us a man in the forefront of educational progress, with 
an experience that has left a record, honorable to himself and 
creditable to his city. We desire his services among our schools 



PvEPOET OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 137 

as Superintendent ; and that the Board may have this, the rela- 
tions of Superintendent, Secretary of the Board, and Principals 
should be clearly defined as to their duties and responsibilities. 
We cannot afford to have the time of so valuable and important 
an official as the Supeiintendent altogether taken up with the 
details of his position. The Principals also are needed in their 
positions at the head of the teaching force of the large buildings. 
Most cities have two masters in each building of ten or twelve 
rooms. VTe have but one, and we cannot spare them from their 
places, that they may help out the Superintendent while he is 
occupied with detail. These faithful j^ublic servants are all 
doing what they can in harmony, and by mutual assistance, to 
promote the educational interests of the city ; but we would sug- 
gest the importance of having such acconamodations furnished 
the Superintendent as would enable him to attend to the super- 
vision of the teachers and scholars and relieve the Principals, 
that they may devote themselves to their legitimate spheres of 
action, which are fully as important and of more direct and per- 
sonal influence on the welfare of theu* classes and character of 
the scholars. 

The purchase and distribution of text-books and supplies are 
of such infinite detail that their demands upon the Superin- 
tendent, together with the time required for the selection and 
employment of teachers, have of late taken him almost out of the 
schools in his supervising and advising capacity. This year an 
office has been provided for the use of the Superintendent, which 
has been temporarily located in the Public Library Building, 
An assistant has also been furnished, and the amount of business 
that is transacted here, in the interest of the schools, shows its 
importance and necessity. It is proposed to put this department 
on a permanent and substantial basis, and organize it in a prac- 
tical way. The Superintendent's office becomes, as soon as 
established, headquarters for all supplies, etc., covered by the 
appropriation for school contingent, which now amounts to about 
twenty thousand dollars ; and this, together with the school 
salary appropriation, niakes an amount of clerical work that must 
be j^rovided for. Other departments of the city have theii- 
clerks and store-rooms ; but, as it is only recently that all text- 
books and supplies have been furnished at public expense, on 



138 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

account of whicli this department has gradually grown to its 
present proportions, no provision has been made for it. In one 
of the new school buildings hereafter to be erected, a large room 
should be provided as the office of Superintendent of Schools, 
with appropriate store-rooms for supplies of convenient access. 

IS^o supplies should be sent to the schools from the dealers, 
but they should be received at this office, and the bill for the 
same should here be checked. The quality of the materials 
should be examined, that the Board may be certain that the city 
gets the benefit in number, amount, and quality of every article 
paid for. From here the supplies can be distributed to the vari- 
ous buildings or teachers by authorized requisition. All text- 
books not in use in the schools should be returned to this office 
to prevent accumulation in the closets of the various buildings, 
and allow an inspection that would discard the worn out, and 
repair the damaged. Here such property could be insured 
against loss by fire, and accounted for against negligence and 
carelessness. Of course this means what some would call " red 
tape " ; but it is necessary with all matters of public finance, that 
there should be established reasonable guards against mistakes 
and frauds, and a certain amount of convenient arrangements for 
the performance of public service by elected officials, who are 
the responsible parties in such matters. 

Such a department will properly admit of a reconstruction of 
the financial methods of the Board, so that sub-committees, by a 
more intimate knowledge of the purchases in their various de- 
partments, may approve the bills for the same, rather than that 
the whole duty should be imj)osed upon the Committee on Fi- 
nance. 

IsTo one other than a regularly authorized committee and no 
member of a committee, except by direction of that committee, 
should contract a bill of any kind, for any purpose, on behalf of 
the school board. 

It has been suggested that the Committee on Text-Books, 
Music, Drawing and Penmanship should make all purchases 
authorized by the Board and approve the bills for the same ; 
and that a Committee on Printing should authorize and recom- 
mend all blanks etc., to be used by the schools. It is impossible 
to do this in this way without some one place and some clerical 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL C0:MMITTEE. 139 

assistance, as no man can give the time required for such duties 
on the part of the committee if he must arrange with all the 
teachers and visit all the schools ; but, Tvith the facts all at hand 
in the Superintendent's office, the legally authorized officials will 
not find it necessary to delegate their duties to one who should 
be devoted to other branches of the service. 

Additional school room accommodation is a subject that re- 
quires more or less space in every school report. Our immediate 
wants in this direction have so long been under consideration 
that the needs of Wards Two and Four have come to be gener- 
ally recognized. We feel encouraged to think that the coming 
year will see at least two new buildings well under way, if not 
completed. Our rapid growth as a city demands a careful 
consideration of this important question. Xothing proves so 
attractive to the class of citizens we would invite to become 
residents of our city as good schools in commodious buildings. 
We are now so crowded that not only is the efficiency of our 
schools restricted, but the health of the teachers and pupils is 
endangered by the fact that so many are confined in the rooms 
in excess of the number that the air space will accommodate 
under sanitary restrictions. In many instances we are emplo^s'ing 
two teachers in a single class room, a practice at once expensive 
and inefficient. And the outside rooms employed for school 
purposes are unsatisfactory to the school authorities because of 
their isolation, which takes from the pupils the advantages of 
the association and the direction provided in larger buildings ; 
and to the parents, because they feel that their children are not 
receiving all the benefits given the childi-en of their neighbors, 
who are not obliged to put up with these make-shifts. 

Several of our school buildings are so old that it must soon be 
as important a consideration to j^ro^ide for their abandonment 
as to provide additional school accommodations. 

The primary schools are doing good work. The budding 
intelligence of the little folks is being dii-ected by means of 
methods that will please and gratify any who have not recently 
idsited this department. 

The Kindergartens established this year have proved valuable 
additions to this work, although, in the raain, they are overflow 
classes from the crowded primary schools. We have not yet felt 



140 ANNUAL REPOETS. 

that our finances would warrant tlieir establishment for scholars 
under the school age, although in some sections of the city, where 
" children are five at a very early age," they would accomplish 
for the children of poor parents what many of our citizens are 
doing at home, or at private expense. 

The committee are in hopes, at some early day, to extend the 
systematic instruction of music to this grade, by rearranging the 
course of musical instruction. The advantages of this instruction 
are so easily apparent in other cities, that we should no longer 
hesitate in this matter. 

The grammar schools are the nucleus of the whole system of 
public education in our city, and of great importance from the 
fact that many of the scholars have no other educational op- 
portunities. The corps of teachers in charge is at once complete 
and efficient, and the schools show good results. 

It is important that the valuable services of these trained and 
successful teachers should be given as much to the pupils as 
possible, rather than taken up by the preparation of examina- 
tions and classifications of results, which do not advance the 
pupil nor improve the teacher. Both should have every oppor- 
tunity to impress each other mth their own individuality. We 
should strive to throw off the yoke of educational communism, 
of too much system, and too close confinement to a com23arison 
by percentage whether the standard is absolute perfection, or 
the work of the best scholar, and return to greater individual 
latitude. The influence of the Principals, as men of affairs, of 
social ascendency, is so im23ortant a factor in the character 
building of the pupils of our upper grades, that we should have 
their constant attendance in these classes during school hours. 
And, while they may supervise the schools in their respective 
buildings, they should not act in the capacity of sub- superinten- 
dents, with jurisdiction over their so-called districts. 

In the grammar grades the course of study has been so modified 
as to admit sewing and a more extended course of drawing. This 
does not mean that the course is crowded to excess, or curtailed 
in the essentials, to admit fancy or technical branches ; but the 
plan is, as will be seen in the Superintendent's Report, to im- 
prove and vary the work. 

The evenino^ schools have been a success wherever the demand 



REPOET OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 141 

of a sufficient number has Trarrantecl their maintenance by the 
committee. The school for elementary English branches in the 
Luther Y. Bell Building and the drawing school in the High 
School Building should be provided every season. We are in 
hopes to have some suitable place for the drawing classes, where 
more attention can be given to the mechanical drawing. Before 
the establishment of school-rooms in the High School Hall, which 
took our only available room for this use, we had a very success- 
ful class in this work. Our experience shows it to be something 
sought for by a class of young men engaged in mechanical pur- 
suits, whose ambition and desire to learn should be encouraged 
in every reasonable way. The experience of cities with evening 
schools goes to prove that drawing and high school are more 
successful than grammar schools, from the fact that the class of 
pupils who attend the latter are engaged in such laborious pur- 
suits that they are too tired to do much studying in the evening 
after a day's work. 

The High School, by the last catalogue, has a membership of 
four hundred and twenty-two, with one hundred and thirteen in 
the college course. The school is overcrowded and has outgrown 
its limits, and the problem of its future is now before the Board. 
Its success as a preparatory school for college has made the Som- 
erville High School justly famous, and we are proud of its fame. 
But, as so few of the scholars aspire to college, even of those 
who select the college course of study, this being selected by 
many with the idea that it affords the highest discipline and best 
use of the time, it is to many of the Board of doubtful expe- 
diency to enlarge the school on its present basis. 

Our population, from its composition, T^-ill always demand a 
laro;e Hio;h School — that is, there will alwavs be a laro;e number 
of scholars whose school life will not end with the grammar school. 
Many citizens think theu- boys are not quite ready for business life 
at the end of the grammar school, and, having no employment 
for them at home, send them to the High School to spend an 
interim of time. Such do not want the college course, but select 
the English course. This course, as now conducted, does not 
awaken such interest and enthusiasm as gives the parents an idea 
that the time is well spent, and for this reason the efficiency of 
the school is criticized. The remedy for this, in the opinion of 



142 AISTNUAL REPORTS, 

many of the Board, is a division of the High School and the 
establishment of an English and a Classical High School, each 
in a building of its own. The English High School should have, 
in addition to the present course, a more complete commercial 
course, and be fitted with a complete outfit to supplement the 
course of manual training and industrial education. Much more 
attention should be given to physical training. Gymnastics and 
military tactics should have a prominent place in the course. We 
should impress upon the minds of our youth that honor and dis- 
tinction lie in the path of the mechanic and manufacturer, as 
well as the merchant or professional man. We have held up the 
professions so long in public preferment that the ranks of indus- 
trial employments are deserted by almost all our American youth 
of means and opportunity. 

Time was, and not long ago, when the boys and girls had the 
advantage of constant association with their parents m the em- 
ployments of life. The home, the farm, and the work-shop were 
one and the same, or so nearly contiguous that the children 
assisted in the regular duties of life, or could overlook them to 
their advantage. Manual training and object teaching were thus 
taught by the parents themselves in ways most effectual, that 
produced men and women so broad in their general make-up 
as to make useful members of society and the bone and sinew of 
the nation. School and its duties were limited to a few weeks 
in the district school, which were in reality the vacation time of 
the year. The advantages of the social economy and condition 
of life peculiar to those times are often ascribed to the district 
school, as, by association, school and education are terms used in 
the relation of cause and effect, as though a person's education 
is entirely the result of his school life. But, as education means 
the drawing out and rounding to effective availibility of all the 
faculties, a moment's consideration will show that the few weeks 
in the year spent in the district school could have had but a slight 
influence in the results of which we are so proud. 

Social conditions in our city are different. These intimate 
relations of parents and children in the work of life no longer 
exist, and both are losers. Business and home are entirely sepa- 
rate and distinct. Our city is a collection of residences, and 
the business, except for domestic supplies, is almost entirely car- 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 143 

ried on in the neighboring city. Our boys and girls are at school 
or at play, unable to assist or overlook any of Jthe mechanical 
duties of life where the work is in actual process. This want 
is what educators feel should be supplied to the youth of to-day 
by our public schools. T. ere is a growing feeling that the whole 
forty weeks of the school year should not be spent in mere 
memoriter exercises, to the exclusion of practice in manual or 
physical exercise that will train the whole child by the use of all 
his faculties. We must make the schools so broad in their routine 
as to supply the child in school with the same general training 
that farm and village life give at home or out of school. 

The foregoing suggestions are mainly in the line of our present 
work. They do not mean radical reform or any disparagement. 
Our schools should enlist our best endeavors ; and it should be the 
ambition of all to place our city first in the Commonwealth in 
the line of school work. And the work must be done with an 
eye to our resources, and the finances should be carefully man- 
aged, that the best results may be accomplished with the means 
available. We cannot expect all these advantages at once; but, 
with a clearly defined purjDose and determined energ}^ in the 
right direction, much may be accomplished. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAS. F. BEARD, 
H. P. HEMEXWAY, 
X. W. BIXGHAM, 
H. P. MAKECHXIE, 



Corn, on 
Annual Report 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of the City of Somerville : — 

Gei^ttlemex, — In compliance with your instructions and in 
conformity with the rules of the School Committee, I have the 
honor to submit my first annual report upon the condition of the 
public schools of this city for the year 1888. 

The following is a summary of the statistics, which may be 
found in detail in the appendix : — 

Population of the city, United States census, 1885, 29,992 

" " " 1888 (approximately) . 85,000 

N'umber of persons in the city between five and 
fifteen years of age in May last, as ascer- 
tained by the truant officer . . . 5,959 
In East Somerville District . . 1,245 
Prospect Hill " . . 2,319 
Winter Hill « . . 864 
Spring Hill " . . 801 
West Somerville " . . 730 
Number between eight and fifteen years of age . 4,206 

valuatio:n". 

Valuation of the city, May 1, 1888 . • . $28,765,400 
Real estate .... $26,488,200 

Personal estate . . . 2,277,200 

Rate of taxation ....... .014 

Estimated value of school property . , . 1428,554 

DWELLlJfGS. 

Number of dwellings in the city. May 1, 1888 , 5,941 

Number of dwellings constructed during the year, 

or in process of construction . . . 256 



REPORT OF THE SUPEKI]S^TEJs"DEXT OE SCHOOLS. 145 



SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIOI^S. 

IS'o new school-houses have been erected during the year. 
The Board petitioned the City Council to move the Prospect 
Hill building to Concord Square, and to erect a twelve-room 
building on its site. This has not been done, however. The 
previous year, the needs of the Prospect Hill District were so 
urgent, that the School Board requested the City Council to 
build a new school-house south of the Fitchburg Railroad, and 
the Committee on Public Property selected a lot of land for the 
purpose, in obedience to the instructions of the Council. As 
nothing has yet been done to relieve the crowded condition of 
the schools in this district, and in view of the fact that the 
subject has been under serious consideration for some years, it 
seems hardly necessary for me to present any new arguments 
in favor of new buildings in AVard Two, except to say that the 
increase of school population, as indicated by the school census, 
makes the case more urgent than it has been heretofore. Tem- 
porary arrangements have been made for the children by the 
opening of schools in Independent Hall, in the Eberle Building, 
in the Avon, — a brick block on Somerville Avenue, near Med- 
f ord Street, — and by putting extra seats in the Prospect Hill 
School-rooms, and providing assistants in three of the rooms. 
Instruction under such circumstances is very inconvenient, and 
the results are necessarily unsatisfactory. The Bell School has 
been enlarged by the fitting up of a new room in the basement. 
Winter Hill District. — In the Forster School, the first grade 
is so crowded that additional furniture had to be put in and 
an assistant appointed. 

Spring Hill District. — The Franklin, Harv^ard, Beech Street, 
and Spring Hill buildings are in very poor condition and inade- 
quate to the needs of the district. Except during the inclement 
season, or when contagious diseases have prevailed, the rooms 
have been filled to their utmost capacity. It has become neces- 
sary to open two new schools in the basement of the Morse 
School-house to accommodate new classes. 

West Somerville District is still lacking in seating capacity, 
the overflow classes of the Highland School being accommodated 
in two stores on Elm Street. 



146 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



NEW BUILDINGS. 

The erection of new school buildings should demand the seri- 
ous consideration of the City Government during the coming year. 
The condition of the Prospect-Hill, Brastow, Jackson, Bennett, 
Webster, Union, Franklin, Harvard, Beech-Street, Spring-Hill, 
and Cedar-Street buildings is well known to the School Commit- 
tee and the citizens. The number, location, size, and arrange- 
ments of these school-houses make it very difficult to accomplish 
the best results. It is doubtful in my mind whether the sanitary 
requirements are complied with ; the cost of maintaining them 
is greater than it should be ; they require a great expenditure of 
time for supervision ; and it is difficult, and perhaps almost im- 
possible to exert through them the elevating and upbuilding 
influence that should emanate from every school centre. 

It should be the policy of the School Committee to establish 
new schools in healthful and convenient localities, where the sur- 
roundings would contribute to the moral development of the 
children, where noise and clatter of travel and business which dis- 
tract the attention of the children and rack the nerves of the 
teachers, may be as far removed as possible, and where all classes 
may conveniently assemble for equal advantages of instruction 
and training, so that the children of the poor may, by asso- 
ciation, feel the influence of the culture and refinement of the 
more fortunate. The only way to make the whole community 
better is to bring the lower up to the average of the higher. 
This is the spirit of the common-school system. This is the 
underlying principle of all our American institutions. The school 
and the school-house should be higher, or at least as high, in 
character as the community in which it is located, if it is to exert 
the influence and accomplish the results for which it is intended. 
These school-houses should be larger than our old ones, that 
greater numbers may be accommodated under one roof. The 
cost of the schools per pupil will thus be greatly lessened. We 
will need a less number of principals, janitors, furnaces, text- 
books, and it will require less time for the superintendent and 
the music, drawing, and sewing teachers to make their visits of 
inspection and instruction. It will also be much easier to grade 
the schools and keep the instruction up to the standard. There 



REPOPtT OF THE SVPERIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 147 

is, of course, an advantage in ha^Hlng small schools for little chil- 
dren near their homes, but our districts are becoming so compact 
that there are now no great distances for any children to travel. 
To be more specific, I would locate a school in the Prospect-Hill 
district that would accommodate the children belonging to the 
Prospect-Hill, Brastow, Bennett, and Jackson schools and the 
Somervalle- Avenue Kindergarten ; another near Concord Square 
for all that now attend the Webster, Union, Eberle Hall, Inde- 
pendent Hall, and some from the Bell and Prospect Hill ; another 
between Summer Street and Somerville Avenue, to take the 
pupils of the Beech Street, Franklin, Harvard, and possibly 
relieve the Morse and Cummings. I would like to have these 
located on high ground, built of brick, newly furnished, and as 
complete in every respect as the other new buildings erected 
during the last few years ; but they should be heated and venti- 
lated by the best system known in the United States. 

I take the liberty of directing your attention to the last report 
of my esteemed predecessor, in which he set forth the necessity 
of increasing the accommodations in the High School, and of 
establishing another grammar school centre. He so thoroughly 
knew the condition and needs of the school districts that his 
opinion must be more valuable than mine, and better entitled to 
your consideration. My experience enables me to reinforce his 
suggestions and \\ashes, and I sincerely hope that what he has 
recommended and anticipated so many years may soon be accom- 
plished. 

Two plans by which the High School might be relieved have 
been considered : one, to build a Tving on the present building ; 
the other, to erect a new building and organize an English High 
School. Of these two plans, I do not feel called upon to judge. 
I have not had time to master the conditions in the High School 
and prefer to become fully acquainted with the institution before 
advising any change in its organization. I am, however, well 
aware that there is not room enough at present for the needs of 
the school. There should be improved and increased facilities 
for instruction by laboratory methods. This would necessitate 
additional room and apparatus. As a temporary expedient, the 
High School Hall has been divided into two class-rooms ; but no 
additions have been made to the apparatus. 



148 AN^NUAL REPORTS. 

In giving my views on these points, I have only considered 
what seems to me necessary and have not estimated the cost of 
the needed changes. It is for the Board to decide whether the 
the finances would bear the expenditures. 

TEACHEES. 

There have been more than the usual number of changes 
during the year. The Superintendent and Committees have 
consumed much valuable time finding suitable candidates to fill 
vacancies. Twelve teachers have resigned, three of whom have 
taken other positions considered, by them, more desirable. Three 
have been granted leave of absence for the year. Two were 
omitted from the list because of failing health. Twenty new 
teachers have been elected, and five have had appointments 
temporarily. In addition to this number, several have been 
assigned as assistants in large schools. 

RESIGJfATIONS. 

East Somerville District : 

Miss Frank P. Hudson, principal of the Edgerly School. 
Miss Fannie F. Fuller, teacher in the Edgerly School. 
Mrs. Hattie M. Peirce, teacher in the Edgerly School. 

Prospect Hill District : 

Miss Hattie E. Adams, teacher in the L. Y. Bell School. 
Miss Alice M. Wight, teacher in the L. Y. Bell School. 
Miss Lillian M. Walton, teacher in the L. Y. Bell School. 
Miss Lucy E. Clark, teacher in the Prospect Hill School. 
Miss Helen M. Dodge, teacher in the Brastow School. 

Winter Hill District : 
Mrs. Alice W. Emerson, principal of the Bingham School. 

Spring Hill District : 
Miss Bertha L. Emerson, teacher in the Beech Street School. 

West Somerville District : 

Miss Florence N. Robbins, teacher in the Highland School. 
Miss Mary E. Emerson, teacher in the Highland School. 



REPORT OF THE STIPE RIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 149 

The following teachers have been granted leave of absence : 
Miss Emma F. Schuh, teacher in the L. Y. Bell School. 
Miss Eliza L. Schuh, teacher in the L. Y. Bell School. 
Miss Hallie M. Hood, teacher in the Burns School. 

APPOINTMENTS. 

East Somerville District : 

Mr. Edgar L. Raub, principal of the Edgerly School. 

Miss Carrie E. Cunningham, teacher in the Edgerly School. 

Miss Gertrude L. Gardner, Edgerly School. 

Prospect Hill District : 
Miss Abbie A. Hayward, teacher in the Bell School. 
Miss Gertrude E. Robbins, teacher in the Bell School. 
Miss Ruble M. Stetson, teacher in the Bell School. 
Miss Mary A. Bradford, teacher in the Bell School. 
Miss Abbie A. Gurney, teacher in the Bell School. 
Miss Joanna A. Barry, teacher in the Bell School. 
Miss Lillian C. Albee, teacher in the Brastow School. 
Miss Ida F. Fillebrown, teacher in the Cummings School. 
Miss Florence O. Bean, teacher in the Bennett School. 
Miss Nellie F. Sheridan, teacher in the Webster School. 

Spring Hill District : 
Miss Ella P. McLeod, teacher in the Spring Hill School. 

West Somerville District : 
Miss Jennie M. Horner, teacher in the Highland School. 
Miss Mary Winslow, teacher in the Elm Street School. 
Miss Lucretia C. Sanborn, teacher in the Elm Street School. 

SPECIAL APPOINTMENTS. 

Miss L. A. Herri ck, teacher of Drawing. 

Mrs. C. M. Coffin, teacher of Sewing. 

Miss Mary L. Boyd, teacher of Sewing. 

Mrs. J. S. Soper, Kindergartner in Spring Hill District. 

Miss Alma L. Greene, Kindergartner in Spring Hill District. 

Miss Sarah E. Kilmer, Kindergartner in Spring Hill District. 

Miss Alice E. Warner, Kindergartner in Prospect Hill District. 

Mr. Raub is a graduate of the Lock Haven State Xormal 
School, in Pennsylvania, and has had valuable experience as a 



150 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

teacher in two of the best normal schools in his native State, and 
as principal of a public school in Paterson, N. J. 

Miss Herrick is a graduate of the Massachusetts Normal Art 
School ; has taught the drawing in the Salem Normal School 
during the last five years ; and has, at the same time, taught 
and directed the drawing in the schools of Watertown, In 
parting with her. Superintendent Dwelley wrote me as follows : 
" Miss Herrick was paid by Watertown, $500, and, simultane- 
ously, by the Salem Normal School, $600 ; so that the salary of 
our drawing teacher, measured by the full time standard, was 
$1100. Nothing less than 11200 could have taken her from us, 
and you are fortunate in having a committee intelligent enough, 
and an appropriation large enough, to warrant your employment 
of her at your figures." 

Mrs. Cofiin was for many years a teacher in our schools, and, 
with a practical knowledge of needle-work, and a tact in teach- 
ing, is well adapted to her new work. 

Miss Boyd, with a practical knowledge of sewing, a natm-al 
talent for teaching, unbounded enthusiasm as a worker, has 
proved the wisdom of her appointment. Both have given much 
study to the systems employed in Boston, Springfield, Philadel- 
phia, and other cities, and together give promise of marked 
success in their work. 

I cannot emphasize too positively the importance of appoint- 
ing the best talent to our teaching force. The policy held so 
tenaciously by the Board, and so strongly advocated by my 
predecessor in his final recommendation, should be maintained. 
None but those eminently fitted for the service should be con- 
sidered as candidates. The delay in filling vacancies this year 
has been occasioned by the strict adherence to this principle, and 
the various committees have realized the difficulties in finding 
candidates of the standard here established. In my report to 
the Board in November, I advised the consideration of some 
plan by which greater inducements could be offered to our own 
teachers, and to those whom it may be advisable to secure to fill 
vacancies. I believe that our present schedule of teachers' 
salaries should be remodelled. The most difficult positions we 
have to fill are the vacancies in primary classes. The work of 
the primary teacher is as taxing and arduous as that of any. It 



REPORT OF THE SUPERIJ^TENDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 151 

requires equal tact, as careful prej)aration for daily work, as 
thorough professional training, as wide study of methods, which 
are constantly varying, as much stamina, endurance, and uniform 
patience to teach the first class as any in the system. It has 
long been recognized and acknowledged that the teacher of the 
youngest pupils earns as much salary as any other, and, in many 
places, the salary is the same, or larger than those of higher 
grades, when the experience is equal. Very often the first class 
is the largest : there are more little faces to remember, more 
little minds to study, more little hands to train and keep busy, 
more little coats to button up and rubbers to put on, more new 
names to keep record of, and parents to interview. The at- 
tendance is more irregular, and the results are less satisfactory. 
All these and other considerations should guage the compensa- 
tion. In looking for new teachers, I found that many towns and 
cities either pay salaries equal to ours, or are willing to increase 
the pay of their best teachers rather than lose them. I would 
respectfully recommend that the salaries of the primary teachers 
be increased. 

The great awakening in the teaching profession throughout 
the country, which has been so marked during the last few years, 
is also experienced by our teachers. I find them alive to the 
importance of conducting their work on scientific principles, of 
keeping abreast of the times, and of making a study of educa- 
tion in all its aspects. To ascertain the professional character of 
our teaching force, I sent a circular to all the schools soon after 
assuming the duties of the office, which, among other subjects, 
inquired as follows : 

"Where were you educated? (a.) High School, Seminary, or 
College? (b.) N^ormal or Training School ? (c.) Special School, 
Summer Institute, etc. ? 

" What periodicals do you subscribe for or read ? What works 
on education have you in your library ? Or, what works have 
you read? 

" Would you like to have me recommend educational reading ? 
" What do you think of drawing as a factor in education ? 
"What do you think of the introduction of sewing or other 
features of industrial or manual training into the schools?" 
The circular was replied to and returned by every teacher in 



152 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



the city, and revealed, much to my satisfaction, that a large 
majority had received professional training, owned libraries con- 
taining the best works on education, subscribe for and read the 
current professional literature, and hold sound views upon the 
most progressive movements and features of existing systems. 
Among the books composing these teachers' libraries were 
mentioned Compayre's, Painter's, and Hailman's Histories of 
Education, Quick's " Educational Reformers," Sully's " Psychol- 
ogy," Payne's " Science and Art of Education," Bain's " Education 
as a Science," Spencer's " Education," Rosencranz's " Philosophy 
of Education," Tate's " Philosophy of Education," White's " Ele- 
ments of Pedagogy," Fitch's, Page's, Parker's, Prince's, Currie's 
Johonnot's, Swett's, Calkins', and Sheldon's works, and many 
others, all standard and valuable books. Beside professional 
works, there were also many of a general character. I am m favor 
of general reading in connection with professional reading, and 
in this we have the endorsement of some of the best authorities. 
Dr. Harris says that much of the teacher's reading should be 
such " as will secure general culture and furnish new inspiration 
in the task of instruction." He emphasizes the fact of the 
teacher's humanity, and says : '' By how much the more they 
cultivate and broaden it, by so much do they increase the value 
and efficiency of their teaching powers." 

Some of the schools are organizing libraries containing the 
best authorities on the history, science, and methods of teaching, 
and some sustain magazine clubs. All this indicates a live interest 
in professional progress. 

With the same ends in view, we have recently organized a city 
Teacher's Association, which promises to be very helpful in our 
work. The constitution contains the following statement of ob- 
jects and principles: 

Objects. 

The objects of this Association shall be to unite all teachers of Somerville 
into one organized body of professional workers for the welfare and progress 
of the public schools, to consider the aspects of education, to study its prin- 
ciples, to improve its methods, and to advance teaching as a profession. 

Principles. 
This Association holds : — 

1. That the highest end of education is the formation of character. 

2. That this end is to be attained through the complete and harmonious 



REPORT OF THE SUPERIXTE]SrDEXT OF SCHOOLS. l53 

development of the human being in his three-fold nature,- — physical, intel- 
lectual, and moral. 

3. That intellectual development depends upon the conscious self-activity 
of the individual in the exercise of all the faculties of perception, thought, 
and expression. 

4. That a system of education should furnish such instruction and 
training as shall stimulate all the energies of the child in their natural order 
and at the proper time, by means of appliances, material, and subjects of 
instruction adapted to the powers of the pupils. 

5. That each grade of school should provide for the acquisition of knowl- 
edge, the development of thought power, and the use of expression in all 
its appropriate modes, whether by construction, drawing, or language. 

6. That the child is of more importance than the school ; that the natural 
growth^ of the child in his three-fold character should never be subordi- 
nated to the maintenance of an organization or machine. 

7. That no system of classification, examinations, or promotions should 
interfere with individual progress and growth; that no series of text-books, 
apparatus, or contrivances should hamper instruction, or stand in the way 
of the discovery and investigation of truth; and that no effort should be 
made to attain excellence in any subject of instruction for its own sake, 
to the detriment of the progress of the child in the process of character- 
building. 

8. That to fully comprehend the importance of our calling, and to accom- 
plish the jmrposes of an education, we, as teachers, should aspire to the 
highest professional standard attainable, to the mastery of principles, to the 
emancipation from stereotyped methods. 

9. And that we all, being members of one body, and realizing the impor- 
tance of each and every one to the whole system, hold it to be our duty to 
give to each other all the sympathy, aid, and cooperation in our power, and, 
so far as the opportunities may permit, undertake to familiarize ourselves 
with the aims, the principles, and the methods of the several departments, in 
so far as such knowledge may contribute to the general welfare and progress, 
and render our individual work more harmonious and more effective. 

OUR SCHOOL SYSTEM. 

Our primary schools admit children of five years of age. The 
course covers the usual work of a primary school, reading, spelhng, 
wi'iting, numbers, etc. The " etc." embraces a good deal of 
what the teachers call busy work, more or less essential in so far 
as it satisfies a need felt by every progressive teacher, and more 
or less effective in proportion to the wisdom and discretion of 
the teacher, and the system employed in the use of the material. 
A mere statement that the usual primary course is poorly adapted 
to the natural development of a little child when he enters school, 



154 AlS'NUAL KEPORTS. 

might not be accepted unchallenged. I had occasion, a few 
years ago, by means of circular letters, to collect the opinions of 
leading educators in all parts of the country upon the ability of 
children to receive the ordinary primary school instruction, and 
the conclusions drawn from the replies show that the instruction 
is inappropriate, not only as intellectual training, but as a means 
of physical and moral gi-owth of the child. 

Children at five years of age come to school in physical health 
from the enjoyment of freedom in the open aii*, with that activity 
which is so essential to the gi'owth of the body, and a knowledge 
of things which has come to them by the natural exercise of their 
faculties. It is important that we should put them under condi- 
tions favorable to natural growth, and employ methods that will 
promote the develo}3ment of all their powers of body and mind 
along the lines in which theii' activity has been exercised. 

Activit}^ is necessary for the natural growth of the child, and 
care should be taken that the requirements of the school shall 
not interfere mth, but rather foster, his inclination, and render it 
a means of proper training. In first bringing the child in contact 
with what is to be learned, it is necessary to further develop 
those senses by which he has acquired his present knowledge, 
and teach him to see correctly, listen attentively^ and handle 
carefully. 

The steps already taken in modifying the instruction of the 
first grade, by the introduction of the study of form, is a step 
in the right direction, because it brings the child in contact with 
things and material. The introduction of kindergarten work, in 
some of our districts, as a feature of the primary course, is the 
establishment of systematic training that meets every want of 
the child. The next step to be taken is the establishment of the 
kindergarten as an essential feature of the school system. This 
would open the door to little ones at least four years of age, at 
which time t\iej are capable of taking up the work of that 
department. It seems hardly necessary to present arguments 
in favor of establishing kindergartens in every primary school in 
the city, when so many cities on every hand have recognized 
their importance, and voted appropriations for theii' maintenance. 
In most places the school authorities have adopted the kinder- 
garten system only after theii' necessity has been demonstrated 



REPORT OF THE SUPERIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 155 

by private parties and charitable associations. TVould it not be 
TDetter to institute this feature of a complete system in recogni- 
tion of the pedagogical principles upon which it is based, and 
on purely educational grounds ? 

Without going into a detailed explanation of the kindergarten 
system, I will simply make a brief statement of what educators 
claim for it. It cannot be gainsaid : 

That the kindergarten system is based upon the principles of 
education. 

That the kindergarten system aims mainly at the formation 
of character, by developing the three-fold nature of the 
child. 

That the exercises are adapted to the abilities of the children. 

That they satisfy the child's desire to do, and furnish proper 
occasions for his natural activity. 

That the faculties of the child are developed by the healthy 
exercise of his powers. 

That knowledge is primarily to be acquired through the senses 
by studying and handling things. 

That ideas should grow in the mind, and not be implanted 
by means of words. 

That self-activity, which finds expression in play, can be directed 
to useful occupations. 

That the development of the child's social nature fits him to 
occupy his proper place in a community. 

That it is the most natural course of training for children in 
their first year or two of school experience, and that it should be 
established as the foundation of eveiy school system. 

All the elementary grades should include work that will de- 
velop the two sets of faculties by which a child learns, viz. : 
faculties of acquisition and faculties of expression. Some por- 
tion of the kindergarten material, much of the kindergarten 
method, and a complete infusion of the kindergarten spirit should 
characterize the elementary school. Drawing, paper-cutting, 
modelling, sewing, etc., should occupy a fair proportion of time. 
It has been found that five hours a day are too much for the 
intellectual labor of a child ; the afternoon of school work is of 
very small importance in the primary school unless devoted to 
light occupations. The ordinary studies of the elementary school 



156 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

may be used to develop power, provided they are used according 
to the true principles of education. 

Modifications of our present work could easily be made to pro- 
vide greater facilities for the development of power in the child. 
The methods of teaching should result in making the child able 
to teach himself. As the course progresses, children should 
become students, and the effort of the teacher should be directed 
to teaching how to study, how to make use of knowledge, and 
how to exercise power. By this means, greater accuracy will be 
obtained, definite knowledge will crystallize in the mind, and it 
will be easier to hold pupils to definite results. 

What I may say in regard to the various subjects of grammar 
school work will more definitely convey my meaning. 

I need not dwell upon the established work of our schools, 
which is so well and thoroughly done. The results are such as 
you might well be proud of. Modifications are being made from 
time to time, as occasion demands, as new conditions arise, and 
as new experience and new light enters the school-room. 

We have made some slight changes in our course and in the 

methods of teaching, but very little need be done, and the 

modifications should be those that develop from natural, healthy 

growth. 

Arithmetic. 

Too much time is devoted to this subject, and too many cases 
are studied. In making the new time schedule, some of the 
time has been given to other studies, and the. Principals have 
been directed to abbreviate the work. During the coming year, 
I hope to re-arrange the course and submit to the Committee 
an outline of what, in my judgment, can and ought to be done. 

Language. 

Language and kindred subjects and Music receive the same 
attention, and are taught by the same methods as heretofore. 

Geography. 

At the beginning of the year, a slight change was made in the 
course in Geography. Instead of teaching the first lessons from 
the elementary text-book, the instruction now partakes of obser- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERII^^TEI^^DEXT OF SCHOOLS. 157 

vation and oral lessons accompanied by reading from elementary- 
geographical readers. The design is to have the children well 
grounded in the elementary ideas and facts of natural geography. 
It is important to form perfect concepts, before the imagination 
can picture any distant facts. A valuable feature of the instruc- 
tion should be the making and drawing of the elementary facts 
and the simple maps that represetit the countries taught. It is 
expected thus to lighten the work and give it more reality. 
All the modifications in the grammar work, in this subject, are 
intended to make the work more real, and consequently more 
practical. At no period in the history of education, has this 
branch of instruction received so much of the attention due its 
importance as at the present time. Valuable books on methods 
have been issued, and the teachers are coming to realize the true 
value and place of the study. The change also involves the 
substitution of the elementary book for the larger one in 
tbe sixth grade, and completing the subject in the middle of 
the last grammar year. It is intended to dwell less upon the 
technical facts, and to enquire into causes and effects, to make 
geography a science study, and not so much memory work. It 
thus becomes a foundation for other elementary sciences, for out 
of the structure are developed geology and mineralogy, the study 
of vegetable products and all phases of life, giving us botany, 
zoology, etc. The physical conditions determine the location 
of peoples, tribes, and nations, thus affording the foundation for 
sociology and history. The study of geography is not only 
valuable for the facts that are taught, but also for the training 
of the faculties, which will result from proper methods. The 
habit of study, the bent of the mind, the inquiring intelligence, 
are the results that ought to be looked for. Xo text-book can be 
depended upon to impart the knowledge of matter or method that 
should be attained. The teacher must be able to do it by guid- 
ing the pupil in his researches by her own inspiration and 
enthusiasm. We expect to accomplish this by giving the teacher 
latitude and throwing her on her own resources. We should 
encourage and assist her by all the helps and suggestions that 
can be furnished. 



158 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



History. 

Before the summer vacation the Principals and Superintendent 
met to consider changes in the work in History. A plan was 
outlined, and each one was to report before the opening of the 
schools in September. As a result of these deliberations, a course 
was reported to the Board at the August meeting, which pro- 
posed commencing history by reading in the sixth year of the 
course. This reading is to cover two years. In the eighth, a text- 
book is to be supplied for study, and in the ninth, the subjects are 
to be worked up from miscellaneous books, histories, biographies, 
encyclopedias, etc., which shall constitute class libraries. The 
Board appointed a special committee to consider the proposed 
changes, and gave power to authorize the new course, if, upon 
close examination, it should be found feasible. The special 
committee approved the plan in the main, and at the opening 
of the schools it was put in operation. The selection of the class 
libraries was the next consideration. The superintendent made 
a collection of all the best school histories and historical readers 
that could be had, and put them into the hands of the principals 
for examination. After a time, all reported upon the books, 
and the list, with sample copies, was examined by the special 
committee, to v^hom the Board had given power to select the 
books. Most of the books originally selected were purchased 
and the others returned, ^j this method each child has a 
book different from those used by most of the class. The 
facts he finds under his topic may differ from those found by 
others, but they are his. The comparison of facts and opinions 
thus obtained stimulates the spirit of inquiry, and cultivates a 
true method of investigation and research. The plan is experi- 
mental so far as we are concerned, but has been long tried else- 
where, and has been advocated by some of our principals for 
many years. It is expected that the results will be gratifying to 
all interested in the schools. It is not possible this year to prove 
the merits of the system, because much depends upon the begin- 
nings. The ninth classes may not do as well as we expect, be- 
cause they have not had the benefit of previous years' work, and 
the results in the sixth and seventh classes may not be entirely 
satisfactory for want of the books from which the stories are to 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 159 

be read. We have made a beginning, and hope by another year 
to see the results of thf system. The subjects haye been laid 
out in topics, and all the teachers furnished with hektograph 
copies. I wish to acknowledge the yaluable assistance of the 
principals in planning this and all the other work we haye done 
of this character. 

SUPPLEMEXTAET ReADIXG. 

In my first yisits to the schools, I found so many requests for 
supj^lementary reading for all grades, and so little system in its 
use, that I made a careful collection of all the material used in 
the schools, and other books that were suggested by teachers for 
special examination and arrangement. Seyeral meetings of the 
principals were held, and we united upon a plan which was re- 
ferred to the Text-Book Committee, and, after careful examina- 
tion by them, reported to the Board at its meeting in June. The 
books not already in the list were added by unanimous yote. 

The material was diyided into three classes : I. Elementary 
science, including natural history, geography, elementary physics, 
etc. II. History and biography. III. Literature. The follow- 
ing books are included in the list : 

Science Depaktmext. 

Wright's Xature Readers, Xos. 1 and 2. 

Wood's Natural History Readers, Xos. 1, 2, 3, and 4. 

Hooker's Child's Book of Xature. 

Monteith's Science Reader. 

Reading in Xature's Book. 

Burrough's Birds and Bees. 

Geographical. 

Philips' Geographical Readers, Xos. 1 and 2. 
Seyen Little Sisters. Each and All. 
Scribner's Geographical Reader. 

Historical. 

Goodrich's Child's History. 
Mrs. Monroe's " Our Country." 
Stories of American History. 
Xoble Deeds of Our Ancestors. 



160 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Historical, — continued. 

Gilman's Historical Readers. 

Pilgrims and Puritans. 

Philips' Historical Readers, Nos. 1 and 4. 

Grandfather's Chair. 

Scott's Tales of a Grandfather. 

Literature. 

^sop's Fables. 
Andersen's Fairy Tales. 
Robinson Crusoe. 
Hawthorne's Wonder Book. 
King of the Golden River, JRushin. 
Irving' s Sketch Book. 
Seven American Classics. 

The design is to supplement the drill work in reading with 
choice selections upon these subjects in all the grades for which 
the matter is suitable. It is not intended that readings in nature 
or geography shall take the place of instruction upon subjects 
that can be learned by the child by observation and investigation ; 
but it is hoped to supplement personal examination and to 
stimulate inquiry. I am not in favor of instruction by text- 
books when the knowledge can be obtained first hand, and when 
the proper presentation of the objects of study is essential to the 
natural development of the child's faculties. The readings in 
nature should be a guide, a leading to study of nature herself. 
The same is true of geography. A proper presentation of the 
elementary knowledge of geography, and a correct use of read- 
ings that stimulate the investigation and intensify the application 
and study, paves the way for the more serious use of a good text- 
book. In history, the stories and romances are important in 
awakening an interest, and directing the thought and bent of 
the child's mind to the grander themes recorded in the world's 
history, and to the nobler lives that should be the guide and 
inspiration of coming generations. 

It is very important that choice works should be read by 
children for their literary value, to cultivate a discrimination, 
choice, and a taste for what is pure and beautiful in our Ian- 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEEIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 161 

guage. It is wonderful how soon cliilclren become excellent 
judges of merit, how easily their aesthetic taste is cultivated, and 
it is equally wonderful and appalling how easily a taste for 
trashy reading is formed. School is the place for directing the 
mind to a love for the beautiful, the chaste, and the ideal in Hfe. 
With this object in view, selections from the classics of our lan- 
guage have been put upon the list of books for supplementary 
reading. 

It was not possible this year, because of the expense, to supply 
all the schools and grades with books to carry out this plan. 
Some have been supplied at the urgent request of the principals, 
and it is hoped that very soon the reading matter for all the 
schools will be supplied completely to meet all the needs. There 
are to be had other works recently pubhshed, and doubtless there 
will be, from time to time, other books, such as we shall need to 
add to our course. 

GRADUATIOX. 

The graduating exercises of the Grammar schools which took 
place in the M. E. Church, Union Square, on Thursday, Jan. 28, 
were attended by a large and enthusiastic company of friends of 
the schools. Hon. Charles H. Burns and Hon. George A. Bruce 
made addresses. The di2:)lomas were awarded by the Supeiiri- 
tendent. 

The following is the programme : 

ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

PART I. 

1. OVERTURE. "LaFIandre." Bouillon. 

2. PRAYER. Rev. Geoege Skexe. 

3. *SIXGING. " The Heavens are Telling." - - - - Ha^jdn. 

CoMBiKED Grammar Classes. (With Orchestra.) 

4. ADDRESS. ------ Hex. Chas. H. Burxs. 

5. SINGIXG. "The Venetian Boatman's Evening Song." - Hatton. 

Solo axd Chortjs. (With Orchestra. ) 

PART n. 

6. ADDRESS. Hox. George A. Bruce. 

7. SIXGING. "SoMerrily Over the Ocean Spray." - - Pdchc.rds. 

Three-Part Soxg. (With Orchestra.) 

*Director, S. Hexry Hadley, Teacher of Music. 



162 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



9. 



PKESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 

SUPEIlI]!irTENDENT CLARENCE E. MeLENEY. 

SINGIKG. "In Mercy Remember." From Mass. In B flat. Farmer. 
Solo and Chorus. (With Orchestra. ) 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 



DISTRICT COMMITTEE. 

S. N^EWTON Cutler. H. P. Hemenwat, H. C. Weite. Mark F. Burn^s. 



Principal, G. A. Southworth. Assistant, Anna M. Bates. 



Jeanie L. Allan. 
Arthur J. Atwood. 
Grace M. Babb. 
May L. Bates. 
Lottplla E. Bean. 
Alice B. Boyson. 
Mabel C. Bragdon. 
Carrie A. Brainard. 
Mabel S. Brooks. 
Ella J. Butler. 
Elizabeth Caryl. 
William K. Chapman. 
Charles E. Cole. 
Edith L. Cole. 
Maud S. Coledrick. 
Harriette Colgate. 
Thomas S. Collins. 
Annie H. Corson. 
Peter J. Crowley. 
Lillian M. Daley. 
Charles H. Davis. 
Florence C. Dodge. 
Eva M. Durgan. 
Mabelle G. Dustin. 
Frederick T. Dyer. 
Ralph H. Edmester. 
Grace G. Fletcher. 



GRADUATES: 



Nellie H, Fobes. 
Lottie M. Griffin. 
Martha G. Harding. 
Louise W. Haskins. 
Herbert I. Laighton. 
Josephine R. Lincoln. 
Louise M. I^ombard. 
Mary E. Mattson. 
Frank Moore. 
Frank T. Murphy. 
Arthur C. Naugler. 
Gertie L. Nickerson. 
James K. ]S"orman. 
Edith F. Poole. 
Warren C. Rees. 
Ida M. Remick. 
Nannie B. Rich. 
Gertrude M. Robinson. 
Hattie B. Smith. 
Bertha M. Stockbridge. 
Guy W. Sturdivant. 
Carrie M.. Swan. 
Sarah J. Walker. 
Nettie A. Wessells. 
Amy B. Wheeler. 
Edwin T. Whitton. 
Benjamin A. Young. 



KEPOET OF THE SUPEKIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS 



163 



LUTHER Y. BELL SCHOOL. 



DISTRICT COMMITTEE. 

James F. Beaed. Alphonzo H. Cakvill. Chakles I. Shepakd. 



Principal, Heebeet L. Moese. Assistants, Abbie C. Hunt, Maey E. 

Bebey. 



Charles A. Atkins. 
Sarah I. Baird. 
Gregory P. Baxter. 
Louise M. Benet. 
Almon W. Blake. 
Ida F. Blethen. 
Fannie L. Blodgett. 
Sarah L. Bradley. 
Mary E. Brum. 
Charles W. Buskirk. 
Rena M. Chase. 
"William P. Cheney. 
Lillian F. Clisby. 
John R. Copithorne. 
Lillian P. Courtright, 
John E. Crowe, Jr. 
Harry L. Cutting. 
John P. H. Dame. 
George E. Dodge. 
Percy H. Everett. 
Eugene B. Fuller. 
IdaM. Gibbs. 
Howard A. Gilson. 
Florence J. Harwood. 
George A. T. Haskell. 
Ethel M. Hayes. 
Lillian Haynes. 
M. Elizabeth Hernas. 
Charles E. Hollander. 
Sumner E. Hollander. 
Henry F. Halloran. 
John A. Keane. 



GRADUATES : 



James W. Kenney. 
John Kenny. 
Herbert L. Kimball. 
Edith M. Leighton. 
H. Wilder Lewis. 
Edwin E. Lombard. 
Lucy E. Lombard. 
Bertha A. McDonald. 
M. Ellen Mclntosn. 
Minnie C. McLeod. 
Julia May. 
Beatrice L. Miller. 
George P. Moore. 
James J. O'ConneJl. 
Mary A. OTonnell. 
Thomas F. O'Malley. 
Richard W. Power. 
Bertha A. Richards. 
Agnes Ross. 
Albert F. Smith. 
Philip P. Smith. 
Charles D. Solomon. 
Harold Starbird. 
Waldemar Yeazie. 
Marion West. 
Camille M. Whytal. 
Gertrude M. Wiley. 
George A. AYood. 
Edgar H. Wood. 
Hattie L. Woodberry. 
John O. Worden. 
Gertrude H. Wyman. 



164 



AlfNUAL REPORTS. 



FOESTER SCHOOL. 



DISTRICT COMMITTEE. 
QUINCY E. DiCKERMAN. WiLLIAM P. HiLL. NORMAIST W. BiNGHAM. 



Principal, John S. Hayes. Assistant, Mary E. Northup. 



Charles W. Berry. 
Ambrose B. Champney. 
George Corbett. 
Arthur W. Dainty. 
John J. Dorey. 
Fred W. Felch. 
Walter L. Fowler. 
Harry L. Hazen. 
Albert E. Kenneson. 
Ernest J. Loring. 
George P. Richardson. 
Allan Bartlett Souther. 
J. Frank Stackpole. 
Grace N. Brown. 
Grace Hamilton Cooper. 
Alice M. Cooper. 
Kittle C. Coveney. 



GRADUATES: 

Mabel L. Dadmun. 
Mabel Derby. 
Grace M. Downing. 
Carrie T. Folger. 
Ida Earl Godfrey. 
Sadie R. Hagan. 
Laura W. Hawes. 
Alice Maude Hoyt. 
Georgie E. Mahony. 
Lillie J. Martin. 
Annie McCormack. 
Lillian C. McKim. 
M. Ethel L. Pratt. 
Hila Helen Small. 
Anna B. Smith. 
Minnie Snow. 
Susie H. Stone. 



MORSE SCHOOL. 



Martin W. Carr. 



DISTRICT COMMITTEE. 

Horace P. Makechnie. 



Benj. G. Brown. 



Principal, Horatio D. Newton. Assistant, Mina J. Wendell. 



Blanche S. Bradford. 
A. Euphemia Buckley. 
Clara Butterworth. 
Ida P. Clough. 
Charles E. Colby. 
William E. Cotter. 
H. Gertrude Cox. 
E. Maude Cushing. 
Agnes E. Dervan. 
Francis E. Doyle. 



GRADUATES: 

Sophie F. Magarr. 
Edward E. McCarthy. 
Edward A. McMasters. 
Georgie McMasters. 
Alice E. Morang. 
Hattie H. Morehouse. 
Minnie Prince Morse. 
Herbert F. Moulton. 
Patrick J. O'Brien. 
Karl A. Pauly. 



EEPOET OP THE SUPEEIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 



165 



Mabel S. Dyer. 
Gracie Maud Freeman. 
J. Edwin Ganley. 
Katie G. Higgins. 
Grace P. Jennings. 
F. Marshall Jones. 
John F. Kennedy. 
John E. Lacy. 
Ealph A. Landers. 
Ethel H. Lincoln. 
Harriet D. Lochman. 



Grace L. Proctor. 
Augustus S. Quick, Jr. 
Andrew F. Eyan. 
M. Gertrude Stopi)ell. 
Grace A. Tibbetts. 
Lewis H. Towle. 
Orel Towle, Jr. 
Ashur D. Ware. 
Henry A. Wipfler. 
John TV, TTood. 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 



Benj. G. Browx. 



DISTEICT COM>nTTEE. 

Maetix W. Caek. Hobace P. Makechxie. 



Principal^ Geoege E. Xichols. Assistant^ M. Alice Paul. 



John E. Anderson. 
Robert B. Anderson. 
Waldo B. Averill. 
Alice M. Beckley. 
Charles F. Bertram. 
William S. Chandler. 
Alice M. Cheney. 
Florence L. Davis. 
Annie R. Eames. 
Albert W. Foster. 
Cora B. Hovey. 
Mamie L. Hoyt. 
Edith D. Jones. 
Jennie L. .Jones. 
Fred R. Jouett. 
Xora E. Keefe. 
Leroi E. Lacount. 
Grace H. Leach. 
James Edward Lewis. 
Millie A. Libby. 
Ellen I. Locke. 
Emma F. McArthur. 
Lizzie F. McXulty. 
John A. Merry. 
Edward E. Miller. 



GRADUATES: 

James W. Xagle. 
3Iary F. Xagle. 
J^annie Xeedham. 
Ransom P. Xichols. 
Eva A. Nicholson. 
Emily OBrion. 
Josie G- Owen. 
Luella Patch. 
Florence E. Prior. 
Kathleen E. Pillsbury. 
Edith W. Sanborn. 
Ida M. Sawyer. 
Xettie F. Smalley. 
Mabel A. Shumway. 
Charles W. Smith. 
Ellen E. Stebbins. 
Mabel G. Studley. 
Ida B. Taylor. 
Margaret A. Wallace. 
Sadie E. Watkins. 
Abrani L. Whipple, Jr. 
Clifford A. White. 
Florence G. Wilder. 
Harry B. Wilson. 
Maggie F. Wilson. 



166 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



boys, 17; 


girls. 


37. 


" 35 




29. 


" 13 


(4 


21. 


" 21^ 


ii 


20. 


u 17 


ii 


33. 



The whole number of graduates was 243, — 22 more than last 
year: boys, 103; girls, 140. 

From the Prescott School, 54 
" L. y. Bell » 64 
" Forster " 34 

" Morse " 41 

" Highland " 50 
One hundred and fifty-six of the graduates from the grammar 
schools entered the high school in September : boys, 58 ; girls, 
98. 

From the Prescott School, 30 
" " L.V.Bell " 36 
" " Forster " 26 

" " Morse " 31 

" " Highland " 33 



boys. 


11 


, girls, 19. 


a 


17; 


" 19. 


a 


9 


, " 17. 


a 


12 


" 19. 


u 


9 


, " 24. 



THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

The high school is so well established, and so thoroughly 
appreciated by the committee and the citizens, that it would be 
impossible for me, from the limited opportunity I have had of 
examining the course, to give any report of its workings that 
could do it justice. Its reputation as a fitting school for college 
is well known in N^ew England; and the thoroughness of the 
instruction is well attested by the institutions to which our 
graduates go. That some changes may be made to better adapt 
the instruction and training to all classes of pupils is quite prob- 
able ; and I hope to see the day, and that a not distant one, 
when there will be afforded greater opportunities for the de- 
velopment of all the elements of power upon which success in 
life depends. In treating of the need of greater opportunities, in 
the high school, for instruction by " laboratory methods," for 
which term I am indebted to Dr. J. D. Runkle, of the Institute 
of Technology, I used an expression which is so comprehensive 
as to cover about all the features of the recent reforn;is in 
education, or, at least, all those methods which call into exercise 
the pupil's powers of doing, of expression by means of material 
forms. Such facilities could be afforded by a system similar to 
that of the best manual training schools, which might be added 



EEPOKT OF THE SUPERINTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 167 

to the present courses, or might be carried on in a separate 
school. 

Our school system should begin with the kindergarten, and 
end with the manual traininor school and the hiorh school, and 
the intervening grades should represent the steps upon which 
the pupils ascend from the one to the other. In adopting such a 
system we would not be pioneers in unexplored fields, but would 
be folloTv^g the lead of the most progressive cities in our own 
State and in others. 

HIGH SCHOOL COMMEXCEMEXT. 

The thirty-sixth annual commencement of the high school 
was a notable affair. The exercises took place in the Union 
Square Methodist Episcopal Church, on Tuesday, June 26th, in 
the forenoon. Mr. Hadley's orchestra furnished the instrumental 
music. The singing by the school, was, as usual, of a very high 
order. The class was addressed by His Honor Mayor Burns, 
who also awarded the dij^lomas. 

The following is the programme : — 

THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION OF THE SOMERYILLE 
HIGH SCHOOL, TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 1888. 



ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

SINGING * — Chorus : "On Life' s Journey.' ' Veazie. 

(With orchestral accompaniment by S. Henry Hadley. ) 

1. SALUTATORY IN LATIN. James M. Perkins. 

2. ESSAY. Bubbles. A. Mald Hollander. 

3. READING. The Life Boat. 

Nellie F. Chapix. 
SINGING.— Three-Part Song: "Rest Thee on this Mossy 

Pillow." Smart. 

4. READING. Political Aspirations. Marietta Holley. 

Mary A. Pyxe. 

5. Die Wunderkur. 

Gertrude E. Littlefield, Hattie E. Richardson, 

Lena P. Stacy, Edith M. Tower, 

JosiE M.WooDS, William C. Pottle, 

Fred A. Reid, Fred W. Telle. 

* Singing accompanied by Hadley's Orchestra. 



168 AI^^NUAL REPORTS. 

6. READING. The Debating Society. 

Maude E. Stone. 

SINGING. Trio: "Waves of the Sea." Anderton. 

(Young ladies of the graduating class. ) 

7. ESSAY. Bomance and Realism. Charles E. Munson. 

8. FROM "CORIOLANUS." ( Original version in Greek. ) 

Harry F. Gould, * Rosa A. Nichols, 

Harry D. Kennard, S. Edith Russell, 

Frank E. Remick, Mary Sweeney, 

Clarence W. Simpson. 

RECESS. 

MUSIC. — Overture: "Poet and Peasant." Suppe. 

SINGING. —Solo AND Chorus: " Spirit Immortal." Verdi. 

W. C. Pottle, C. W. Simpson, Florence Barnes. 

9. La societe de bienfaisance. 

Lucy F. Durell, Lillian M. Hills, 

May L. Spaulding, Edith E. Towne, 

William A. Tucker, Walter T. Littlefield, 

Cara F. Mullin, Bertha M. Woodberry. 

10. READING. The Doom of Claudius. Maurice Thompson. 

May E. Flitner. 

11. POEM. Florence M. Hamlin. 
SINGING. — Semi-Chorus: "Spring." (Female voices.) Hadley. 

(Composed and scored for orchestra by Henry K. Hadley.) 

12. PROPHECIES. Arthur C. Dunmore. 

13. VALEDICTORY. Ella A. Titus. 

14. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. By His Honor Mayor Bi^ns. 

15. PARTING HYMN. 

Words by Charles E. Munson. Music by Alice G. Bailey. 

MEMBERS OF THE GRADUATING CLASS. 

Florence Barnes. Ella Augusta Titus. 

Nellie Florence Chapin. Edith Mabelle Tower. 

Mabel Grace Dodge. Elizabeth Sears Towle. 

Lucy Florence Durell. Edith Elvene Towne. 

Mabel Alma Field. Helen French Wood. 

May Elizabeth Flitner. Bertha May Woodberry. 

Florence May Hamlin. Josie May Woods. 
Lillian May Hills. 

Gertrude Elizabeth Littlefield. George Herbert Atkins. 

Cara Foster Mullin. Andrew Sanborn Carr. 

May Finette Pillsbury. Arthur Chester Dunmore. 

Sarali Elizabeth Pratt. Warren Herbert Fiske. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 



169 



Mary Alice Pyne. 
Hattie Edith Richardson. 
Jane Evelyn Scranton. 
May Louise Spaulding. 
Lena Park Stacy. 
Maude Eaton Stone. 
Minnie Sherman Thayer. 
Lydia Mabel Thurston. 



Harley Edgar Hall. 
Horace Crosby Hartshorn. 
Walter Trowbridge Littlefield. 
Fred Luther Morrill. 
William Courtney Pottle. 
Fred Alexander Reid. 
Fred Warren Teele. 
William Attwood Tucker. 



COURSE PREPARATORY TO COLLEGE. 



Harry Fuller Gould. 
Edward Xewton Huntress. 
Louis Curtis .Jaques. 
Harry Delano Kennard. 
Charles Edward Munson. 
James Martin Perkins. 
Frank Edwin Remick. 
Joseph Little Rubel. 
Clarence Wadleigh Simpson. 
Joseph Harvey White, Jr. 



Bertha Adams Conant. 
Edith Duchemin Cooper. 
Alice Maud Hollander. 
Alice Mabel Jones. 
Rosa Aurelia Xichols. 
Sarah Edith Russell. 
Mabel Powers Sears. 
Mary Sweeney. 
George Stephens. 
Lida Jane Wilde. 



MANUAL TRAIXIXG. 

That element in education which has special reference to the 
expressive faculties of the human being has been brought into 
prominence by the introduction of what is commonly called 
Manual Training. The name, unfortunately, does not convey 
the full meaning, or, rather, does not imply the educational value 
of the training. The term may be apphed to any exercise in 
which thought is expressed by means of the hand. This includes 
making, drawing, and writing. In these exercises, the hand 
should be trained to be so skilful that the physical act may be 
performed almost automatically. The exjDression should be ac- 
curate and rapid, with as Httle consciousness of the act as possible. 
The child should become as unconscious of the acts in expression 
as he is of the action of his organs of speech, or as a natiu'al 
orator is of his gestures. The httle child, in handling blocks, 
sticks, paper, or clay, becomes skilful and works rapidly, putting 
his ideas into form. His hands become trained to work without 
effort of mind, without thought of the act. He learns to draw 



170 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

by practice upon lines and movement exercises, till the hand 
"goes itself," so to speak. So in writing: after he learns the 
form of the letters, after they are impressed upon his mind 
perfectly, he has to be trained by drill exercises, in which the 
muscles become accustomed to write without thought. A great 
deal of such training is necessary; and, finally, the skilled hand 
can readily obey the mind in giving expression to any thought, 
even the most marvellous invention. 

The material used in expression depends upon the age and 
powers of the children. Manual training is not confined to the 
carpenter's bench, as some people would have us believe ; neither 
is it intended to turn the schools into workshops, nor to graduate 
carpenters, blacksmiths, and machinists from our high school. 
The demand for manual training is a demand of the child for the 
opportunity to gratify a natural, inborn desire to do, to create, 
to express. The argument is based upon the psychological fact 
that there are powers of expression, as well as powers of acquisi- 
tion. The question may very pertinently be asked whether any 
of the faculties or powers of a child should remain unexercised 
and undeveloped in a system of education ; or whether, after 
expending all the resources of the school, and all the energy of 
systematic instruction upon the cultivation of the powers of ac- 
quisition, the counterpart of man, those expressive and executive 
powers by which he becomes of use to the world, by which he 
utilizes the accumulations of knowledge, is to be left to chance, 
or is to remain dormant till it is too late to convert them into 
energy. 

In the primary schools, the course of form-study and drawing, 
which is a continuation of kindergarten occupations, include much 
of the manual training exercises required. The ordinary studies 
of the grammar school also furnish opportunities for this training. 
Geography, which is based upon form, to a certain extent, brings 
the child into close relation with nature in all its various forms, 
and must be studied first-hand, and be expressed in material, 
drawing, and language. This is also true of all the elementary 
sciences related to geography, and growing out of it, — botany, 
geology, zoology, physics, history, etc. In arithmetic, the ele- 
ments must be learned by tangible objects, and computations, 
measurements, and practical problems must be worked out by the 



REPORT OF THE SUPERIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 171 

use of material and drawings. This is the only sure way of lay- 
ing a foundation for higher mathematics, which is to come later 
in the High School. 

On May 28th, the special committee which was sent to Phil- 
adelphia to inspect the Industrial Exhibition of the work of the 
public schools of that city, submitted a report which was re- 
ceived and ordered published in the annual report. It was as 
follows : 

To THE School Committee of Somekville, Gextlemex : 
Your committee appointed to AT.sit the Industrial Exhibition of 
the Public Schools of Philadelphia, respectfully report as fol- 
lows : That they attended the exhibition in Horticultural Hall, 
Philadelphia, and while in Xew York City, \T.sited the College of 
the Industrial Education Association, and the Hebrew Technical 
Institute. They had the pleasure and the privilege of convers- 
ing Tvith the superintendents and instructors in these several 
institutions, and thus gained much valuable information in regard 
to the subject of education. 

On reaching Horticultural Hall^ Philadelphia, your committee 
was met by Superintendent MacAlister, several of the assistant 
superintendents, and the chairman of the Exhibition committee. 
The exhibition included (1.) A display of all work done in the 
public schools. (2.) Classes of the various departments at work. 
(3.) Samples of all books, material, and furniture supplied to the 
schools. (4.) Schoolrooms representing the past and the present. 

1. The display of pupils' work included: a. Kindergarten 
Department — Arrangement of gifts, display of clay modelling, 
card modelling, paper folding and cutting, pea work, sewing, 
di^awing, etc. h. Primary Grades — Drawing, modelling, pen- 
manship, maps of paper, cloth, putty, clay, plaster, etc., comj^o- 
sitions, sewing, and other specimens of school work. c. Indus- 
trial Art School — Drawings, clay tablets, tiles, bas reliefs, and 
wood carving. (This represents an optional course open to 
grammar school jjupils.) d. Jla/nval Training School — Speci- 
mens of freehand, mechanical, architectural, decorative, and map 
di*awing, models in clay, wood work, including carpentry, joinery, 
turning, j^attern making, modelling, and caiwing ; metal work — 
vise work, forge work, tempering, moulding, brazing, mechanical 



172 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

construction, and electrical apparatus. e. The Girls' Sigh 
School exhibited drawing and needle work of all kinds. 

All sections of the city were represented in this collection, 
which was displayed systematically. 

2. In the centre of the hall was an elevated platform upon 
which there were classes of children with their teachers, one in 
sewing (giiis of the grammar grades), one kindergarten, and a 
cooking room with all the equipments, and young ladies from the 
girls' high school, making dishes fit to set before a king. Your 
committee had the opportunity of sampling the food, and can 
vouch for its quality. It is almost needless to say that the 
teacher of this department was a graduate of the Boston School. 

The Industrial Art School occupied a large stage at the rear 
end of the hall where students were engaged in di-awing, mod- 
elling, and carving. 

The Manual Training School occupied a large room in the front 
of the building. Beside the display of work already spoken of, 
there was the full equipment of the school on a limited scale. 
Boys were at work at carpentry, wood turning, carving, mould- 
ing, forging, tinsmithing, chipping, and filing, — while others were 
drawing, and another section had a complete system of electrical 
apparatus in operation. 

3. Philadelpliia supplies the schools with everything needed, 
and the display of this material was astonishing. 

4. An old-time school was restored, with furniture in use 
thirty years ago, a bundle of birch rods being the only appliances 
for instmction. On the other hand, a modern school room repre- 
sented the equipment of a school of to-day, which looked very 
much like our own schools, with possibly some more conveniences 
and improvements, of which your committee made note. 

In consulting with Superintendent MacAlister and others, 
much information was gathered, of which the following may be 
mentioned : 

Children are received into the kindergarten at three-and-a- 
half or four years of age. The complete kindergarten system is 
employed. The kindergarten spii'it animates the higher grades, 
and many of the occupations are carried into the primary classes. 
All the exercises of the schools are designed to occupy the 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERIXTENDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 173 

children in a natural and healthy way, so as to cultivate all their 
acti^dties. Care is taken to give the children continued occu- 
pation, that they may learn to use all their senses in receiving 
knowledge and giving expression. The danger of an overstrain 
of the intellectual powers is thus avoided. 

The experience of recent years has convinced the teachers, 
the school board, and the citizens of Philadelphia that manual 
training from the kindergarten, which is the foundation, to the 
Manual Training School, can he engrafted into the schools, and 
is an essential feature of a complete educational system. It is 
necessary as a means of developing expressive powers, the 
representative faculty of the child, and in giving him executive 
ability. 

The teachers have demonstrated that this principle can be 
applied in many of the ordinary branches of school work, notably 
form-study^ number^ drawing^ geogrriphy^ elementary science., etc. 
All the girls are taught se's\'ing from the fourth year of school, 
and soon learn to make and mend garments for themselves and 
their brothers and sisters. 

The following information in regard to the Manual Training 
School will be interesting. The course covers three years, 
which is about equally divided between mental and manual 
exercises, one hour a day being given to drawing, two to shoj) 
work, and three to study. The course follows these lines. 
1. Language. 2. Pure Mathematics. 3. Applied Mathematics 
and Science. 4. Drawing. 5. Tool Instruction. The object 
of the school is to educate all the faculties. Pupils do not enter 
for the purpose of becoming mechanics. It is not a trade school. 
Boys who graduate from the grammar schools may enter the 
Manual Training School, or the High School, at their own option. 
Strange to say, the sons of well-to-do people, professional men, 
and those who appreciate the value of an education, attend the 
former, while the sons of people who have had to struggle and 
ton all their Lives enter the latter. The statistics show that the 
attendance at the Manual Training School is better, and the boys 
stay longer than in the High School. The former is increasing 
in numbers everv vear. Graduates of the Manual Traininor 
School obtain situations at once, or go to higher professional or 
technical schools. Everv bov knows what he is best fitted for, 



174 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

and finds something suited to his tastes. The course provides 
for the development of every talent, and each boy finds some 
feature of the work that meets his every want. Consequently 
the principal is able to tell just what line each boy should follow 
and will best succeed in. 

Hehreio Technical Institute. — This institution is situated on 
Stuyvesant place, in New York City, and is supported by sub- 
scription. Boys from ten to twelve years of age are received 
without examination. Some come from primary schools. The 
course of study embraces the English branches, drawing, and 
construction, including clay modelling, wood carving, turning, 
pattern making, carpentry, and metal work. The course is similar 
to the Philadelphia Manual Training School, but differs in grade 
according to the needs and ability of the boys. The school is 
for a certain class of boys, and provides just the training they 
need and are capable of. Three hours are devoted to study and 
three to drawing and shop work. One hour is given for the 
noon recess, when every boy is given a good substantial dinner, 
the serving of which affords opportunity for instruction and 
culture. 

Your committee saw boys engaged in all kinds of work and 
in recitation, in which it was evident that the lads had clear 
conceptions and were able to express themselves accurately. 
We found a room full of boys, staying, voluntarily, after 
school, till six o'clock, to learn carving. The principal says 
he has to drive them away, and many want to come on holi- 
days. 

The school has demonstrated that the Hebrew child, of a race 
supposed to be destitute of all mechanical or manual ability, is 
capable of the highest possible development in this direction, 
and may go out to take positions of responsibility in industrial 
and scientific occupations. We saw specimens of the most 
delicate workmanship, that would have done justice to older 
hands and maturer intellects. If such results are attainable by 
boys of these antecedents, what may not be expected of the 
sons of the most ingenious and skilful people on the face of the 
earth ? 

The Industrial Education Association. The limits of this 
report will not enable your committee to do justice to this impor- 



REPORT OF THE SIJPERIXTE:N^DEXT OF SCHOOLS. 175 

taut Institution, which is recognized as the he ad- quarters of 
Industrial Education. 

The association occupies the old Union Theological Building, 
No. 9 University Place, Xew York City. It was established 
to collect and spread information, to cultivate public sentiment, 
and help to estaVjlish Industrial Education. It has a museum, 
where are displayed specimens of work from the leading manual 
training schools of the country, representations of the gifts 
and occupations of the kindergarten, drawing, and construction 
work from primary and grammar schools in many cities, and 
collections of specimens. The association has established a 
college for the training of teachers, with a faculty of distin- 
guished educators, at whose head is Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, 
the President of the association, who is at the same time one of 
the professors in Columbia College. 

In connection with this college are departments established as 
model schools, representing all grades. There are the kinder- 
garten, the primary classes, grammar classes, sewing, freehand 
drawing and modelling, domestic economy and cooking, mechan- 
ical drawing, carpentry and wood-work, chemical and philo- 
sophical laboratories, etc. The equipment of these departments 
is perfect ; all the best and newest appliances are in use. A 
beautiful hall for chapel exercises and public lectures occupies 
a part of the first floor. Here are given each year to teachers 
courses of free lectures upon educational subjects. 

In this report your committee do not present these institutions 
as the first or only ones of the kind. V^^e simply report upon 
what we saw and learned, with conclusions to be drawn from it. 
We must not overlook the fact that all and perhaps more of this 
kind of work can be seen in Boston, and much of it emanated 
from Boston. The School of Technology is the father of manual 
training in this country. But we feel repaid for the time and 
expense of the visit to Philadelphia, and saw in one collection 
what would have taken weeks to have seen in visiting separate 
schools. 

In view of all the work seen and information gathered, your 
committee are convinced that the establishment of manual 
training as a feature of the Somerville schools is practical and 
expedient, being -an essential part of a complete educational 



176 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

system, and they respectfully recommend that the school com- 
mittee inquire further into the subject, and take into considera- 
tion the advisability of inaugurating such features of the system 
as can be introduced. 

MARK F. BURNS, ^ 

M. W. CARR, I Committee. 

C. E. MELENEY, ) 

When it is possible for the Board to appropriate the money, I 
hope to see a beginning made in a systematic course of tool instruc- 
tion in wood -work, including carving, sawing, and carpentry, to 
be supplemented at some time by turning and metal- work. Ex- 
periments in other places have proved that Grammar School boys 
of fourteen years and upwards are capable of taking such a course. 
The need of it has almost passed beyond the debating point. The 
whole subject is so large that I hope the Board may make especial 
inquiry into it, and decide upon a plan for its introduction. 

So much has been written upon this subject that an extended 
discussion here seems unnecessary. There are some considera- 
tions that have occurred to me why it is more necessary to intro- 
duce manual training into our schools than in places where the 
tendency of the youth is towards mechanical pursuits. I believe 
such a system is just as necessary for a boy who is to take a 
professional course as for one who is to be a mechanic, and per- 
haps more so. If such training develops the man, the boy who 
is to take up his father's trade will some day receive the benefit 
of it, while the youth who is to study a profession may never 
have the opportunity. In a city like this, situated as it is under 
the shadow of three colleges or universities, and within the sound 
of great commercial enterprises, the pupils of our schools look 
forward either to a college course and a professional life, or to 
the inducements offered by the pursuit of commerce. The am- 
bition of the young man goes out in one of these two directions, 
and his inclination is not the result of experience, not influenced 
by a knowledge of his fitness for either one or the other ; it is a 
mere notion. The result is that many take a professional course 
who should enter the marts of trade, while others drift about 
from one store or ofiice to another, not knowing what to do, and 
some would better succeed in other industries. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPEEI:N'TEIs'DE>s"T OF SCHOOLS. 177 

It is impossible for a young man to know what he is fitted for 
in life unless all his powers have been tested, all his faculties ex- 
ercised, all the germs of life and character allowed to grow and 
develop. Our education should so develop every child that it 
may enable him to see himself as he is, that every latent power 
may be excited, awakened, and energized into a potency, that he 
may at once choose his specialty and fit himself for his natural 
calling. 

It should be so broad as to reach all the elements of power 
and of character. It should not be so narrow that any one could 
get through and amount to nothing afterwards, or that any one 
may fall out by the way because he does not feel the benefit of 
the instruction ; nor should it consume the time and energy of 
the student, and leave other and greater opportunities unutilized. 
It should be a training suitable for eveiy one who takes it, no 
matter what his calling may become, as suitable for the coming 
farmer as the future doctor or clergyman, as necessary for the 
rising politician as the mechanical engineer, builder, or scientist. 
Let technical and special training be private. 

DRAWING. 

The drawing in our schools has been unsatisfactory for some 
time, and a change of system and method has been desired by my 
predecessor and many of the principals and teachers. The Board 
considered the subject at the meeting in May, and voted to em- 
ploy a director of drawing, and the Superintendent was requested 
by the committee to recommend a candidate. Inquiries were 
immediately instituted, information was solicited from all good 
authorities on the subject, and all available candidates were in- 
vestigated. The following qualifications were set as the standard : 
1st, a teacher j^ossessing a complete art education, if possible a 
graduate of the Massachusetts N^ormal .\rt School; 2d, one who 
comprehends the value of drawing as an element in j^ublic- school 
work and its relation to education, and who is a student of the 
principles and methods of teaching ; .3d, a teacher of experience 
in public-school work and in teaching or directing teachers. We 
were fortunate in finding such a candidate in Miss Herrick, but 
could not obtain her services before November 1st. At that 



178 • ANNUAL REPORTS. 

time we were ready to begin. In considering the question of 
the adoption of a system, the committee considered the follow- 
ing statement of principles and outline of a course : — 

In consideration of the establishment of a system of drawing 
on a broad educational basis, I deem it important to lay before 
you an outline of the course which I believe we ought to pursue, 
and present some considerations bearing upon the principles uj^on 
which it is founded, and the methods by which it can be carried 
into effect. 

I. As to the course. In inaugurating a new work, you can 
appreciate the fact that it would-be impossible to apply the per- 
fected course to all the grades of our schools, as much of the work 
depends upon the foundation, which must first be laid. It would 
be useless, therefore, to adopt a course at present, because such a 
scheme must be built up year by year. I do submit to you, how- 
ever, the outline of the Course of Study in Form and Drawing 
prepared under the direction of the State Board of Education, 
and by them authorized for use in the schools of this State, 
which, I am sorry to say, has not been followed by our teachers, 
nor, so far as I can learn, adopted by this Board. Accompanying 
this, I also submit the course prejjared by a committee of the 
National Teachers' Association, which committee was composed 
of Superintendent MacAlister of Philadelphia, and a number of 
other distinguished educators, a course accepted and adopted by 
the National Teachers' Association at their meeting in Madison, 
Wis., in 1884. I have for your inspection at any time the courses 
pursued in several cities, which have been recognized as being 
correct in principle, and practical in every respect. 

These courses we propose to follow in our work in Somerville. 
We intend to commence in the first grade with the little children. 
As color makes an earlier impression than form in the mind of a 
child, educators place the study of color first in the curriculum. 
In many places, the subject is presented in connection with draw- 
ing because it is naturally associated with it, and is an important 
feature of industrial education. It is one of the first lessons of 
the kindergarten, to which we are accustomed to look for first 
principles. We hope to give it more room in the future. 

We shall next put into the hands of the child the models of the 
first set, that knoAvn in the kindergarten as the second gift^ the 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEPcIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 179 

sphere^ citbe^ and cylinder^ and the accompamTLng modifications. 
These they are to study by the exercise of all the senses through 
which the mind receives the impressions of form. Subsequently 
other type forms are to be used and also the forms of nature. 

In the process of learning and in developing the faculty of 
reproduction or reprresentation^ these t^^je forms and their coun- 
terparts in nature are to be made of clay and to be di-awn on 
paper. This, being fundamental, will constitute the work of all 
the primary grades at present, and, to some extent, of the gram- 
mar classes as well, the time spent upon form-study depending 
upon the ability of the children to master it, and their fitness to 
proceed to advanced work. 

It is, therefore, necessary to supply each building with a box 
of models, from ten to twenty pounds of artists' clay, lead pencils, 
cheap manila drawing-paper, and manuals to guide the teacher 
in the use of the models. 

The kindergarten system furnishes us the jjrinciples of the study 
of Form and Drawing. All geometrical solids are taught from 
the type forms ; the pAane figures from the faces of the solids 
tablets, and paper ; and the lines from the edges of the solids and 
sticks, strings, or rings. 

These forms are studied in the kindergarten first as " Forms of 
Knowledge." The form and the ideas obtained by the child from 
these objects are expressed through the occvpations oi the kinder- 
garten, clay modelling, paper folding, paper cutting, se^^ing, and 
dramng. This underlies and is a preparation for the study and 
expression by dramng of the facts of form, which leads to Con- 
struction. 

The study of these forms in nature, by elementary zoology and 
botany, and the modelling, making, and drawing of the objects 
is based on the kindergarten gifts and occupations treated as 
" Forms of Life " (animal and vegetable) . The drawing in this 
connection concerns the " appearance of form," which, however, 
includes also the drawing of type forms as to their appearance. 
The representation of " Forms of Life " includes curved and 
straight line figures. Almost everything in nature is graced by 
curved lines. The kindergarten, however, chooses to include 
whatever the child is familiar with. This feature of the di'awino\ 
therefore, deals with curved and straight line drawing. 



180 ANNUAL EE PORTS. 

The symmetrical arrangements of the material in the kinder- 
garten, whether solids, planes, or lines, curved or straight, are 
there called " Forms of Beauty or Symmetry " and is the basis of 
decorative design. 

This shows how important the kindergarten system is as a pre- 
paration for Drawing. The courses adopted by the National 
Teachers' Association, and our leading cities-, make due allowance 
for these three phases of primary drawing, which lead directly to 
the practical application of drawing in the higher classes in the 
three subjects. Construction, Representation, and Decoration. 
We hope to do the same. 

As all the knowledge imparted in the kindergarten may be 
classed under some division of Form, except, of course, those 
qualities or attributes of objects which are incidental, so all 
elementary knowledge depends upon form as its first and most 
important characteristic. This is true of natural history, botany, 
geography, and every elementary science. Children acquii'e 
these elements through the senses. Form is primarily perceived 
by touchy secondarily by sight. How important it is, there- 
fore, that children have tyj)ical forms in their hands, and be 
brought into contact with the real things so abundant in nature. 
Following out the lines of the kindergarten, we find that Form 
underlies science, art, and the industries. We perceive by the 
senses of touch, sight, hearing, etc., and we express thought and 
knowledge by the hand, in making., draicing, and written lan- 
guage^ and by the tongue in oral language. Clay has been found 
to be the most convenient and simplest means of expression in 
form. It is capable of practical use in intermediate as well as 
elementary grades in the High School, and in the artist's studio. 

Drawing is related to form, as a means of expression by de- 
lineation. From the erutset, children should be taught to make 
pictures of what they see, to draw what they know, and, later, what 
they can imagine. The drawing should rej)resent what is in the 
mind, whether a form, a fruit, or a contment. The exercise of 
drawing should tend to perfect the concept and develop the faculty 
of expression. The drawing, when done, should convey to the 
mind of the teacher the knowledge or thought of the little artist, 
or it should be a pattern by which something can be made. Thus 
it maybe a picture of the object, as it looks, or it may be a draw- 



REPORT OF THE SUPEEIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 181 

ing of the actual facts of the object, by measurements, if you 
please. In addition to the former, the object -drawing, it may 
include also the embellishment, or the adornment, of the object, 
leading to the aesthetic in art. 

All the pubHc-school drawing which is in accordance wdth the 
above principles, is the outgrowth of the system established in 
the Massachusetts Xormal Art School, under the dii'ection of 
Walter Smith, and other directors of drawing, employed by the 
State Board of Education. The present Prang system conforms 
to these principles, and has matured from the deyelopments of 
scientific teaching in all grades and kinds of schools. It is the 
embodiment of the ripe experience of skilful and thoughtful 
teachers in various parts of the country, and it rej^resents the 
most recent and the best results of superior teaching in this 
country. It is founded upon the fundamental principles of 
education, grows up naturally from the kindergarten, and 
furnishes all the steps in Drawing of a manual training com*se. 
The Prang system is used in many cities where good results can 
be showTi, and, in adopting it, the Board has been guided by the 
experience of the best educational centres in the country. 

SEWING. 

At the first regular meeting of the present Board, it was voted 
to ask for an appropriation for two sewing teachers, and the 
necessaiy material for commencing the work in the grammar 
schools. During the Spring term, the members of the Committee 
and the Superintendent spent considerable time in visiting 
schools, collecting information on the subject of se^T-Ug, and 
looking up teachers. In September, two teachers were ajDpointed, 
and the work was inaugurated in the fourth, fifth, sixth, and 
seventh, and since extended to the eighth grades. While the 
girls are sewdng, the boys of the same class are engaged in other 
exercises. The course adopted is to teach the. various stitches in 
order, using practice cloth, and to train the girls in the proper 
handling of material and implements. Xo time is spent in 
making garments. The results are most satisfactory. 



182 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



EXAMINATIONS AND PROMOTIONS. 

This subject is of the highest importance, and is one which is 
occupying the careful attention of educators in all parts of our 
country, and of eminent men in other lands. 

The special committee to which the question relating to 
Examinations and Promotions was referred, have had meetings 
on the subject, and the Superintendent and principals have also 
discussed the .methods emjoloyed in our schools. 

It would be out of place for me to formulate any propositions 
in advance of the conclusions which may be reached by the com- 
mittee; but I may presume to express my convictions to the 
effect that some modifications of existing rules should be made. 
I regard oral and written examinations as very important. The 
only precautions to be taken are in the amount and the manner 
of conducting them and the objects for which they are carried 
on. Examinations by the Superintendent should be for the 
purpose of calling the teacher's attention to the important topics 
of the course, and suggesting methods of conducting the work. 
They should ascertain the degree and kind of development re- 
sulting from the instruction, and should tend to unify the sys- 
tems of teaching. Such examinations maybe given at anytime, 
but should not enter as an element in determining the promotion 
of pupils. 

Oral and written tests may be made by the principals and 
teachers, from time to time, to ascertain the efficacy of the in- 
struction and to exercise the pupils in the expression of knowl- 
' edge. Briefly stated, promotions should be made from the record 
of the pupil's work, during the year, or term, determined by the 
success of his efforts, the diligence, apjDlication, and perseverance 
manifested in study, in recitation, and in all the exercises of the 
school. 

TRUANCY. 

The report of the Truant Officer will be contained among the 
statistics. I have not had occasion to enquire particularly into 
this department of the school work, and hope the truancy may 
be so insignificant as not to require my attention. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEEIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 183 



EYEXIXG SCHOOLS. 

The Prescott, L. Y. Bell, and Highland School-houses were 
opened for registry of evening scholars the last week in Septem- 
ber, but there were not registered pu2.)ils enough to warrant the 
opening of the Prescott and Highland. The Bell school has 
been conducted with marked success, keeping up the attendance 
creditably. The session commenced Oct. 1, and closed last week. 
The usual course has been followed with the addition of readingrs 
in elementary science, which has occasioned some practical think- 
ing, and readings in history, which will direct the young people 
to an interesting and profitable field for future study. 

The evening drawing schools which opened in October have 
not yet finished the course. The Mechanical Drawing class has 
occupied a part of the hall of the high school, and has been very 
largely attended by an interested class of young men, — some 
beginners and others advanced students. The success of the 
undertaking is gratifying. 

The free-hand classes are also verv laro^e. The advanced work 
is in light and shade, and the elementary class are now at work 
on object drawing. This is too early for a report on this impor- 
tant department of our schools. 

The names of teachers, statistics, etc., will be found in the 
appendix. 

COXCLUSIOX. 

The present week terminates the first six months of my con- 
nection with the public schools of this city. I experience some 
little difficulty in formulating a report of their condition and the 
work being accomplished, much of which you know as well as I. 
In looking upon my work here, I am sensibly conscious of 
failings in many particulars, and suffer keen disappointment in 
not becoming^ as thoroucrhlv conversant with all the schools as I 
hoped to do by this time. This I expect to make up during the 
remaining months of the school year. In conducting the work 
of the secretary, I have encountered difficulties that can easily 
be remedied by a few changes in methods and the establishment 
of a system which, partaking more of machinery, is yet neces- 



184 AlfNUAL REPORTS. 

sary in managing business of such a miscellaneous cliaarcter as 
is carried on in this office. In the responsible and continuous 
duty of furnishing supplies, I owe great obligations to the Com- 
mittee on Supplies, who have unhesitatingly advised and assisted 
in this laborious task. During the coming year, I shall hope to 
inaugurate some changes, with their help, that shall facilitate 
matters. I am also greatly indebted to the Committee on Draw- 
ing for their patience and consideration of the business that has 
been transacted, for their cordial indorsement of my policy, and 
their fidelity in carrying out the recommendations establishing 
the system now used, and securing the services of an experienced 
and trained director. Allow me also to exj)ress my appreciation 
of the courtesy and support of the committees on text-books, 
industrial education, and the special committee on courses of 
studv, in establishino; new features of work in our schools. To 
the other committees, and to the Board, I express my sincere 
thanks for their forbearance, for their advice, co-operation, and 
encouragement. I hope to receive suggestions at any time that 
will aid me in carrying out the orders of the Board, executing* 
the rules and regulations, or making such changes in the work of 
the schools as will enable them to accomplish the highest possi- 
bilities attainable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. E. MELEXEY, 

Superintendent of Public Schools. 

SOMEKYILLE, Dec. 31, 1888. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 



185 



APPKOPRIATIOXS AXD EXPEXDITUEES. 





Estimated. 


Expended. 


Deficit. Balance. 


Salaries of teachers . . . 


$88,000 


885,700 66 


1 
- 82,299 34 


Salary of superintendent . . 1 




2,416 67) 


- 


Salaries of truant officers . > 


9,150 


850 00 [ 


$8 80 


- 


Salaries of janitors . . .J 




5,892 13 J 




- 


Water and gas 


950 


953 36 


3 36 


- 


Text-books, stationery, etc. 


4,850 


4,808 57 


- 


41 43 


Writing books ") 

Drawing books . . . . j 


950 


534 04 1 


- 


415 96 


Printing 


300 


526 96 


226 96 


- 


Miscellaneous 


2,800 


1,869 77 


- 


930 23 




$107,000 


$103,552 16 


239 12 


83,686 96 


Net Balance .... 








3,447 84 



Money received for tuition of non-resident pupils 



883 50 



TABLE SHOWING THE NUMBER OF SCHOOLS AXD TEACHERS IN 
THE SEVERAL DISTRICTS, THE NUMBER OF PUPILS IN 
ATTENDANCE IN DECEMBER, THE NUMBER IN THE NINTH 
CLxVSS, AND THE AVERAGE NUMBER TO A SCHOOL. 



Districts. 


!M CO 


5C 

2 
do 


=S| 




^ 1 








^S 


•-0 

o 


> ^ 










z 


<^ 


East Somerville .... 


23 


25 


1214 


61 


52.8 


Prospect Hill 


39 


43 


1998 


94 


51.5 


Winter Hill 


17 


19 


846 


49 


49.8 


Spring Hill 


20 


23 


851 


41 


42.5 


West Somerville . . . , . 


14 


15 


636 


42 


45.4 




113 


125 


5545 


287 


49 



186 



AXNUAL REPORTS. 



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EEPOET OF THE SUPERIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 



187 



TEACHERS. 

Number of teachers (including 7 assistants)' 

Male, 9 ; female, 130. 
Number of teachers in high school . . . .10 

Male, 3 ; female, 7. 
Number of teachers in the grammar grades . . 67 

Male, 6 ; female, 61 (including 1 assistant). 
Number of teachers in the primary grades (including 

6 assistants) . . . . . . .58 

Teacher of music . . . . . . . 1 

Teacher of drawing ....... 1 

Teachers of sewing ....... 2 



139 



139 



SCHOOLS AKD TEACHERS. 









Sala- 


^-3 


Schools. 


Teachers. 


Where Educated. 


ries. 


;5 ^ 


High . . . 


George L. Baxter . . 


Harvard College . . . 


$2,400 


1867 


( ( 


Frank M. Hawes . . 


Tufts College .... 


1,800 


1879 


(( 


Charles T. Murray . 


Dartmouth College . . 


1,400 


1887 


u 


Sarah W. Fox . . . 


High School. Taunton. 
Private instruction, in 
classics and German, 






. 




at home and abroad. 


1,200 


1868 


; . 


Sarah F. Litchfield . 


Leominster High School, 
Lawrence Academy, 
Groton. Private in- 
struction in Latin, 










French, and German . 


850 


1880 


(( 


Fannie W. Kaan . . 


Somerville High School 
and Salem Xormal 










School 


850 


1882 


.i 


Eudora Morey . . . 


Maiden High School and 
Bridge water Xormal 










School 


800 


1882 


li 


Laura E. Giddings . 


Wellesley College and 










Boston L'niversitv . . 


800 


1882 


a 


Bessie R. White . . 


Colbv L'niversitv . . . 


700 


1887 


a 


Josephine H. Short . 


Boston L^niversitv . . 


600 


1887 


Prescott . . 


G. A. Southworth . 


Chicago, 111., and Low- 
ell, Mass.. High School 










and private study . . 


1,900 


1873 


a 


Anna M. Bates . . 


Salem High and Xormal 










Schools 


700 


1874 



188 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOLS AND T:E ACimn^ — Continued. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Where Educated. 


Sala- 
ries. 




Prescott . . 


Adelaide Keed . . . 


Bridgewater Normal 










School 


$650 


1877 


u 


Abbie A. Anderson . 


Stoughton High School 
and Canton Training 










School 


600 


1878 


(( 


Emma M. Gate . . 


H igh School , Winchester, 


600 


1882 


u 


Amelia I. Sears . . 


Holliston High School 
and Westfield Normal 










School 


600 


1873 


(( 


Catherine T. Brown . 


Somerville High School, 


575 


1868 


il 


Clara Taylor . . . 


u u u 


575 


1871 


u 


Sarah E. Pratt . . 


Reading High School 
and Bridgewater Nor- 










mal School .... 


600 


1877 


(( 


Elgina M. Plummer . 


High School, Boston 


550 


1877 


u 


Florence M. Morton . 


Somerville High School, 


550 


1882 


u 


Ada Cowles , . . 


u u u 


550 


1875 


u 


*Louise E. Pratt . . 


U C( (( 


350 




Edgerly . . 


Edgar L. Eaub . . 


Lock Haven State Nor- 




~ 






mal School, Pa. . . 


1,000 


1888 




Amy C. Hudson . . 
Lilla J. Pike . . . 


Somerville High School, 
High School and Acade- 
my, Salmon Falls, N. 
H., and So. Berwick, 


600 


1885 






Me 


600 


1887 


(( 


C. E. Cunningham . 


Salem Normal School . 


575 


1888 


( ( 


Vacancy. 








(( 


Mary B. Currier . . 


Somerville High School, 


550 


1873 


u 


Lillian Nealley . . 


Salem Normal School . 


550 


1882 


it, 


Clara M. Bagley . . 


Somerville High School, 


550 


1873 


Davis . . . 


Lucretia A. Burns . 


High School, Milfard, N. 
H., and Framingham 










Normal School . . . 


625 


1882 


a 


Florence A. Kobinson, 


High School, Dover,N.H. 


550 


1883 


u 


Gertrude A. Earle . 


Bridgew'r Nor'l School, 


500 


1884 


u 


Priscilla A. Meriitt . 


Salem Normal School . 


550 


1885 


L. V. Bell* *. 


Herbert L. Morse 


Sherborn High School 
and Bridgewater Nor- 










mal School .... 


1,700 


1885 


ii 


Abbie C. Hunt . . 


Ipswich Fem. Seminary, 


675 


1873 


u 


May E. Berry . . . 


Somerville High School, 


675 


1880 


4( 


Lillian M. Walton . 


Holyoke High School 
and Westfield Normal 










School 


600 


1886 


U 


Sarah S. Waterman . 


Bridgew'r Nor'l School, 


550 


1888 


( I 


Nellie A. Knowlton . 


Salem Normal School . 


600 


1887 


u 


tEmma F. Schuh . . 


Somerville High School, 




1874 



* Assistant. 



t On leave of absence. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEEIJfTENDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 



189 



SCHOOLS A:N^D TIIACILE^S — Continued. 









Sala- 




Schools. 


Teachers. 


Where Educated. 


ries. 


■2 « 


L. Y. Bell, . 


Eub ie M. Stetson . . 


High School and Acad- 








emy, Hanover, Mass., 










and Private Xormal 










Training 


$600 


1888 


( ( 


Alice I. Xorcross . . 


High School .... 


600 


1885 


u 


Fannie A. Wilder 


High Sch' 1 and Academy 


600 


1874 


cc 


Nellie A. Hamblin . 


Somerville High School 
and Bridgewater Normal 










School 


600 


1882 


u 


Gertrude E. Bobbins, 


Bridgew'r Xor'l School, 


400 


1888 


(( 


Mary A. Bradford 




600 


1888 


(( 


Annie E. Searles . . 


Westboro' High School 










and private training . 


575 


1887 


(( 


*Eliza L. Schuh . . 


Somerville High School, 




1882 


u 


Abbie A. Gurney . . 


Bridgewater Xormal ' ' 


550 


1888 


u 


Abbie A. Hayward . 


Andover High School 
and Salem Xormal 
School 


550 




Prospect Hill, 


Helen Tincker . . . 


Mt. Holyoke Seminary 
and Salem Xormal 


# 








School 


700 


1872 


C( 


Sarah A. Tuttle . . 


Somerville High School, 


400 


1886 


u 


Ellen Ledyard . . . 


(( ( ; u 


575 


1874 


u 


Lizzie W. Parkhurst, 


Gloucester High and 










Training Schools . . 


550 


1885 


11 


Lilian A. Wellington, 


Boston Xormal School . 


400 




a 


Charlotte I. Houghton, 


Somerville High School, 


550 


1875 


it 


lEugenia M. Blaikie . 


(( U (i 


200 




li 


t Clara M. Smith . . 


U (( n 


200 


• 


a 


t Agnes Gordon . . 


Somerville High School, 
and Boston Xormal 
School 


200 




Cummings . 


Lydia J. Page . . . 


Somerville High School, 


625 


1869 


u 


Addie M. Brown . . 


a u (( 


450 1886 


I ; 


Ida F. Fillebrown . 


;; u u 


400 1888 


u 


Annie Coffin . . . 


;; u i( 


500 


1884 


Brastow . . 


Maria Miller . . . 


(( (( u 


575 


1875 


u 


Lillian C. Albee . . 


High School, Xo. Attle- 






• 




boro' 


550 


1888 


Bennett . . 


Mary B. Smith . . 


Me. Wes. College, Kent's 










Hill, Me 


625 


1885 


u 


Florence 0. Bean . . 


Framingham Xormal 










School 


400 


1888 


(( 


Annie E. Sheridan . 


Somerville High School 
and Salem Xormal 










School 


400 


1886 


(i 


Isadore E. Taylor 


Somerville High School, 


550 1883 



On leave of absence. 



t Assistants. 



190 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOLS AND TEACKIIRS — Continued. 



Schools. 



Jackson 



Som. Av. Kg. 



Webster 



Union . 
Forster 



Teachers. 



Annie E. McCarty 
Fannie L. Gwynn 



Lena G. Allen . . . 
Annie E. Crimmings, 
Alice E. Warner . . 



Sarah E. Kilmer . 



Carrie E. Cobb 

Nellie F. Sheridan 
Annie L. Savage . 



Annie E. Eobinson 
John S. Hayes . 
Mary E. Northup . 

Mary E. Stiles . . 



Marietta S. Murch . 

Minna L. Wentworth, 

Frances M. Gnptill . 

Lizzie F. Clement 
Alice A. Batchelor . 



Addie S. Winneck 
Martha H. Pennock 
Leila Y. Colby . 
Annie S. Gage . . 
Lizzie G. Perry . 

*Laura C. Duddy . , 



Where Educated. 



Somerville High School 

li U (( 

and Salem Normal 
School .... 
Somerville High School 

a ii ii 

Brooklyn, andKindergar 
ten Training School 
Boston . . . . 

High School, Needham 
Mass. , and Hancock 
Kindergarten Train- 
ing School, Boston . 

High School, Taunton, 
Mass 

Somerville High School, 

Somerville Higli School 
and Salem Normal 
School .... 

Somerville High School 

Phillips Exeter Acad' y, 

Higli School, Centre 
ville, R. I. . . . 

Bridgton Academy, Me. 
and Training School 
Farmington, Me. . 

Gorham Normal School 
Me., and Portland 
High and Training 
School 

High School, Salmon 
Falls, N, H 

Training Department of 
Eliot Academy, Leb- 
anon, Me 

Tilton, N. H. , Seminary, 

High School, Northboro, 
Mass 

Salem Normal School . 

Somerville High School, 



High School, Nashua, 
N. H 

Somerville High School 
and Salem Normal 
School 



Sala- 
ries. 



$625 1880 



^-3 
" 4) 



450 

500 
500 



550 



400 

625 
300 



550 

550 

1,800 

675 



600 

600 
600 



600 
575 

575 
575 
550 
550 

550 



550 



1886 

1884 
1884 



1888 



1888 

1887 
1888 



1873 
1876 
1878 

1878 



1883 

1887 
1885 



1869 
1884 

1877 
1883 

1879 
1883 

1878 



200 



* Assistant. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEEIXTEXDEXT OE SCHOOLS. 



191 



SCHOOLS AXD TEACBUB^S — Continued. 



Schools. 



Bingham . . 



Teacheks. 



Wheke Educated. 



ries. I ^5 



Cedar Street, 
Morse . . . 



Harvard 
Bums . 



Highland 



Beech Street, 

Spring Hill . 
Franklin . . 



Marj' A. Osborne 

Alice Simpson . 

Xora F. Byard . 
Cora Foster . . 
Alice M. Porter 



Horatio D. Xewton 
Mina J. "Wendell . 



Stella Hall 



Pauline S. Downes . 

Ella F. Gould . . . 
Anna E. Sawyer . 
Mary A. Haley . . 
Augusta M.Houghton, 
Anna Pushee . • 



*Mrs. J. S. Soper. . 
Mary £. Bos worth 
Nelly W. French . . 

Ella P. McLeod . . 
Alma L. Greene . 
Hattie A. Hills . . 
E. C. Sumnierhayes . 

Anna C. Damon . . 

Caroline S. Plimpton, 

Florence B. Ashley 
Laura J. Brooks . 
Minnie S. Turner. 
Hallie M. Hood . 
Annie L. Brown . 
George E. Xichols 
M. Alice Paul . . 
Harriet B. Sargent 



High and Training 
School, Quincy. . . 

High and Xorl School, 
Xewburyport . . . ■ 

Somerville High School, 

(( ;; .; 

Somerville High School \ 
and Salem Xormal 
School 

Bridge w'r Xor'l School, 

High and Training 
Schools. AVoburn . . 

High School. Xo. Read- 
ing, and Salem Xor- 
mal School .... 

Cooper Union, Xevv York 
City 

Lowell and Xashua . . 

Somerville High School, 

Boston •• " 

Somerville •' " 

Somerville High School 
and Bridgewater Xor- 
mal School .... 

Cambridge K'g Tr"g Sch. 

Siate Xor'l School. X.H. 

Quincy High and Train- 
ing Schools .... 

Boston High School . . 

Cambridge K'g Tr'g Sch. 

Someiwille High School, 

High School, Xantucket, 
Mass 

Worcester State Xormal 
School . . . . . 

Southbridge. Mass., va- 
rious private schools . 

Somerville High School. 

Providence 

Somerville High School, 

Cambridge " 
Dartmouth College . . 
Somerville High School, 
High School. Barre, 

Mass.. and Worcester 

Xormal School . 



$62.511885 

55011872 
500 18S4 
550,1887 



550|1880 
1,T001886 

6751882 



600 1884 

600 1872 
600 1882 
600 1873 
575 1868 
550 1877 



400 1888 
500 1888 
600 1882 

.5.501886 
550 1888 
500 
650 1874 



oio 1876 
550|1879 

5.50!l859 

400.1887 
625 1883 
500'l885 
550 1884 
500 1885 
1.800 1877 
675 1 1897 



600 1887 



* Assistant. 



192 



A.JfNUAL EEPORTS. 



SCHOOLS ANT) T^EACHERS — Concluded. 



Schools. 



Highland 



Music . 

Drawing 

Sewing 



Teachers, 



Elm Street 



Lincoln . . 



S. Adelaide Blood 



Annie E. Cox . . 
Jennie C. Frazier . 

Sarah E. Pray . . 
Lilias M. Bryden . 
Jennie M. Horner 
Mary Winslow . 
Lucretia C. Sanborn 



Hattie A. P. Koth 

Pauline A. Osgood 

Charlotte F. Mott . 
Annie C. Thayer . 



S. Henry Hadley 
L. A. Herrick . 
Mrs. C. M. Coffin 
Mary L. Boyd. 



Where Educated. 



High School, Leomin- 
ster, Mass. , and Salem 
Xormal School . . . 

StateNor'l School, N.H. 

Cambridge High School 
and Boston Nor' 1 " 

Somerville High School, 



Somerville High School, 

Boston " " 

N. H. jSTormal School and 
Kindergarten Normal, 
Boston 

High School, Hinsdale, 
and "Westiield State 
Normal School . . . 

Lincoln Academy, New 
Castle, Me., and G-or- 
ham Normal School . 

Private school, VYadding- 
ton, N. Y 

Somerville High School 
and Boston Nor' 1 " 



Mass. Nor'l Art School, 
Nantucket High " 



Sala- 
ries, 



600 
600 

525 
575 
550 
350 
350 



550 

625 

450 

550 

450 

1,333 

1,200 

600 

400 






1882 
1883 

1887 
1878 
1888 
1888 



1888 

1887 

1887 

1886 

1885 
1868 
1888 
1888 
1888 



/ PUPILS. 

Number of persons in the city between five and fourteen years of 
age, on the first day of May ........ 

Number between eight and fourteen years of age .... 



5,959 
4,206 



Whole number registered during the year 

Average whole number 

Average attendance 

Per cent, of attendance 

Number of cases of tardiness 
" " " dismissal 
" " " punishment 

Number of pupils in attendance in Jan 
" " " " Dec 

Average No. pupils to a teacher in Dec 

No. pupils over 15 years of age in Dec. 



High 


Grammar 


Primary 


School, 


Schools. 


Schools, 


559 


3,089 


3,614 


379.3 


2,684.3 


2,424.6 


361.8 


2,542.4 


2,269.8 


95.3 


94.7 


93.6 


263 


1,023 


1,652 


626 


1,390 


628 


- 


445 


511 


379. 


2,754 


2,453 


411 


2,890 


2,655 


41.1 


43.8 


51 


372 


247 


2 



Total, 



7,262 
5,488 , 
5,174 
94 
2,938 
2,644 

956 

5,586 

5.956 

46 

621 



KEPOET OF THE SUPEEIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 



193 



EXHIBIT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 





S 














>> 


2 




6 


















s 


^ 


s 






® 








1 






5 




o 




do 








1 

1 










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P 


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<S) 








.s 


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3d 

e3 










o 






-w5 


o 


O 


o 


5H 




r-^ 


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, 


A 


o 


O 


-P 


O 


SCHOOLS. 




g 


a5 

o 


If 




"3 






5 








'3d 
6 


1 


Attenda 


4^ 

< 

O 
c£ 


til 
o 


CM 

o 


o 
m 


< 




P-( 
o 
6 


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> 
o 

m 






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u 




a 






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d 




r^ 


^ 


^ 


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v. 


/^ 


/: 


z 


Z 


<1 


^ 


High School, 


559 


379.3 


361.8 


95.3 


263 


626 


370 


411 


41.1 


372 


Foster Grammar, 


416 


361 


343.8 


95 


35 


84 


7 


372 


388 


47.5 


38 


Primary, - 


2G9 


192.4 


181 


94.5 


39 


28 


1 


185 


218 


.54.5 




Bingham Grammar, - 


45 


.38.5 


.36.2 


94 


10 


44 




41 


42 


42 




Primary, 


217 


147 


1.38 


92 


18 


22 




181 


147 


49 




Cedar Street Priman,-, 


42 


;« 


29 


86.6 


61 


14 


15 


33 


42 


42 




Prescott Grammar, ' - 


419 


3.31.1 


335 


95.4 


30 


90 


32 


388 


355 


51 


49 


Primary, 


254 


172.4 


161 


93.6 


38 


14 


14 


161 


218 


55 




Edgerly Grammar, 


2.34 


210.4 


199.5 


94.8 


23 


.58 


16 


205 


248 


50 


11 


Primarj', 


264 


180 


170 


iW.6 


48 


24 


6 


209 


160 


53 




Davis Grammar, 


57 


43.6 


41 


94 


12 


18 


19 


4T 


49 


49 




Primary, - 


230 


145.6 


134 


92.7 


75 


48 


33 


162 


172 


57.3 




L. V. Bell Grammar, - 


602 


564 


535 


94.9 


203 


333 


92 


560 


634 


49 


78 


Primary, - 


106 


55 


51 


92.5 


12 


3 




51 


62 


62 




Prospect Hill Grammar, 


191 


1.53 


144 


94 


36 


45 


18 


166 


•166 


55 


1 


Primary, 


270 


185 


171 


91 


128 


53 


8 


187 


220 


73 




Cummings Grammar, 


61 


45 


43 


96 


15 


14 


14 


53 


43 


45 




Primary, - 


242 


165 


150 


92 


.54 


21 


18 


188 


166 


55 




Brastow " " - 


118 


85 


79 


93 


71 


50 


24 


88 


84 


84 




Bennett Grammar, 


50 


62 


.56.2 


90.3 


82 


53 


71 


45 


69 


46 


1 


Primary, 


211 


138 


124 


89.9 


1.55 


44 


121 


162 


1.30 


52 




Jackson Gramuiar, 


45 


38 


36 


94.2 


100 


68 


28 


40 


44 


44 


1 


Primary, 


212 


131 


122 


93.1 


243 


25 


95 


143 


144 


48 


1 


Webster Grammar, - 


'as 


31.2 


28.2 


90 


86 


21 


41 


33 


32 


32 




Primary, 


105 


87.3 


81 


92 


84 


1'9 


63 


80 


100 


50 




Union Primary-, - 


67 


53 


46 


87.6 


14 


7 


2 


56 


62 


62 




Somerville Avenue Kin- 
























dergarten, 


38 


31 


25 


80 













38 






Morse Grammar, 


315 


272.6 


260.6 


95.8 


143 


150 


30 


271 


267 


44.5 


30 


Primary, - 


86 


71 


65 


90 


41 


11 








76 


38 




Beech Street and Spring 
























Hill Primaries, 


186 


125 


116 


92.4 


79 


21 


9 


111 


105 


35 




Franklin Grammar, - 


98 


77 


73' 


94 


64 


37 


2 


82 


83 


41.5 




Primary, 


123 


86 


81 


90 


57 


45 


56 


91 


94 


47 




Harvard Primary, 


76 


37 


32.8 




114 


10 


6 


34 


76 






Burns Grammar, 


118 


95.9 


90.6 


94 


46 


83 


16 


96 


105 


48 




Primary, - 


134 


87.4 


81 


92 


32 


72 


3 


97 


80 


40 




Highland Grammar, - 


316 


277 


261.8 


93.9 


78 


254 


45 


282 


297 


50 


36 


Primary, - 


178 


96.3 


121 


93.4 


92 


65 


13 


128 


141 


47 




Elm St. Kindergarten, 


33 


26.9 


25 


92.5 


57 


2 







33 






Lincoln Grammar, 


84 


64 


58.5 


91.4 


45 


42 


14 


73 


68 


40 


2 


Primary, 


153 


94.3 


86 


92.9 


55 


26 


24 


106 


87 


43.5 


1 


Total, - - - - 


7,262 


5,488.2 


5,174 


94 


2,938 


2,644 


956 


5,586 


5,956- 


46 


621 



194 



AXNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE OF PUPILS BY GKADES. 

















"d CO 


Grades. 


Class. 


Xo. of 
Teacliers. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Average 
age. 


No. promote 

to nigher 
grade in Jun 


High . . 


Fourth year") 




17 


49 


66 


18 y. 4 m. 




(( 


Third year, 1 
Second year ' 
First year J 


10 


33 


49 


82 


17 y. 3 m. 


— 


i( 


44 


57 


101 


16 y. 7 m. 


— 


(C 




55 


107 


162 


15 y. 6 m. 


- 




149 


262 


411 




Grammar 


Ninth . . . 


11 


139 


148 


287 


14 y. 8 m. 


243 


(( 


Eighth . . 


S 


160 


195 


355 


14 y. 1 m. 


277 


u 


Seventh . . 


9 


221 


178 


399 


13y. 3sm. 


315 


(( 


Sixth . . . 


10 


280 


230 


510 


12 y. 4 m. 


417 


(t 


Fifth . . . 


14 


348 


269 


617 


11 y. 7 m. 


510 


trl 


Foui-th . . 


*15 


367 


355 


722 


10 y. 7 m. 


605 




*67 


1,515 


1,375 


2,890 


2,367 


Primary . 


Third . . . 


16 


381 


307 


671 


8 y. 7 m. 


538 


a 


Second . . 


16 


447 


351 


781 


7 y. 11 m. 


705 


11 


First . . . 


26 


672 


497 


1,150 


6 y. 5 m. 


660 




158 


1,500 


1,155 


2,655 


1,903 


Total . 


135 


3,184 


2,772 


5,956 





* Including one assistant. 



t Inclndins; six assistants. 



ADDITIOl^AL STATISTICS OE THE HIGH SCHOOL. 
Whole niimber of different pupils during the year . . 559 
Largest number at one time . . . . . . 435 

Kumber admitted during the year ..... 180 

" from our Grammar Schools . . . . 156 

" from other schools ...... 24 

" graduated ....... 57 

" of graduates who entered college ... 14 

" " " " Institute of Technology 

and Scientific schools ..... 7 

" who have left during the year, exclusive of graduates 91 
Whole number at the present time . . . . 411 

Average number to a teacher . . . . . .41 

l^umber over fifteen years of age ..... 370 

" in course preparatory to college . . . 113 



REPOET OF THE SUPERIXTEXDEXT OF SCHOOLS. 195 

Number pursuing the regular course .... 232 

" " Engrlish course .... 66 

in the first class when it entered the school . 170 

" " at the present time ... 66 

second class when it entered the school . 140 

" " at the present time . . 82 

third class when it entered the school . 149 

" " at the present time . . 101 

fourth class when it entered the school . 175 

" " at the present time . . 162 

EVEXIXG SCHOOLS. 



L. Y. Bell School .... 
Drawing School, freehand . 
Drawing School, mechanical 





. 


SH . 


£,-• © o 


© © 


O © 






fc£S 

© X 


4^ a 

©-:; 


o. of 
clier 




^1 


Av 

attei 

Per 
attci 




118 


47 


33 


70 


3 


85 


77 


57.7 


75 


- 


55 


41.4 


37.9 91.5 


4 





tn • 




tor' 
ices 


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o S 3 


03 


•!-»!» 



CH.2 



50 |$101 00;$260 00 
18 



15 



50.50 



360 00 



EEPORT OF TEUAXT OEFICER. 

I^umber of visits to the schools ..... 643 

*^ absences investigated . . . . . 584 

" cases of truancy . . . . . . 164 

" different truants ...... 101 

" truants arrested ...... 13 

" sent to the House of Reformation . . 1 



WEEKLY TIME-TABLE OF SEWIXG TEACHERS. 



Monday . . 
Tuesday, A.M. 

Tuesday, P.M. 
Wednesday . 
Thursday, A.M. 
Thursday, P.M. 
Friday . . . 



MRS. COFFIN. 



L. y. Bell School 

Independent Hall and Cummings 

School 

Burns School 

Morse School 

Lincoln School 

Franklin School 

Highland School 



MISS BOYD. 



Forster School. 
Davis and Edgerly 

Schools. 
Edgerly School. 
Prescott School. 
Prospect-Hill School. 
Bennett School. 
Bingham School. 



196 



AN^NUAL EEPOETS. 



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M^ 

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Bingham 
Prospect '. 
Forster . 
Edgerly . 
Morse 


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PC 


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Burns 
Davis 
Forster . 
Edgerly . 

Morsp. 




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June 3 


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March 

June ; 




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1 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Boakd of ALDEHMEisr, Jan. 23, 1889. 

Kef erred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the annual re- 
ports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. YINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Jan. 23, 1889. 

Referred to the Committee on Printing, to be printed in the annual 
reports, in concurrence. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON AVATER-WORKS. 



To His Honor tJte Mayor and the City Council. 

Gextlemex, — The appropriation made by the City Council 
of 1888 for the extension and renewal of the water- works has 
enabled the Water Board greatly to improve the water system 
during the year just closed. Nearly 10,000 feet of the old worn- 
out cement pipe have been replaced Tvith iron pipe since the ap- 
propriation was made. This much-needed improvement will 
greatly lessen the cost of maintenance of the works in future, by 
reducing the number of breaks, and, at the same time, mil lessen 
the danger from fire, which has been so serious in the past. 
A good deal yet remains to be done in this direction. 

The rapid growth of the city and the consequent demand for 
new services has kept the water department busy during 1888. 
During the year, in addition to the 10,000 feet of new pipe laid 
to replace the cement pij^e, there have been 10,757 feet of new 
water mains laid. Fourteen new hydrants were set, and nineteen 
new gates. There were 414 new services laid during the year, 
— nearly forty more than were laid in 1887. During the year 
there were 79 leaks and bursts. With the new pipe that has been 
laid, the number of bursts will probably be greatly reduced this 
year. The whole number of ser\ices now in the city is 5,410. 

In January and February the heavy frosts, which penetrated 
the ground to a depth of four and one-half feet, caused a heavy 
expense for thawing out pipes, — nearly §3,100. To prevent such 
expense, thirty-one services were lowered to the proj^er depth. 
There has been more or less trouble, for the past ten winters in 
Bond Street, caused by the freezing of the main and service pipes. 
It was found that the main was at an average depth of only 22 
inches, and that it lay upon a ledge for the whole distance, — 631 
feet. The main was lowered four and three-fourths feet through 



200 AIS^lS^UAL REPORTS. 

the ledge, and is now about six feet below the surface. The sur- 
vices in Bond Street were found to be so weakened by freezing 
and thawing that eleven new ones had to be put in. This work 
cost more than $1,100. 

During a heavy thunder storm the lightning struck the pipe 
near the railroad track, on the corner of Pearl and Cross Streets, 
and destroyed nearly 462 feet of 4-inch pipe. At the same time, 
about 390 feet of 4-inch pipe were destroyed in Morrison Street. 
The Morrison Street Pipe was found to be in such poor condi- 
tion that 1,760 feet were replaced with 6-inch iron pipe. 

The need of a high water service in Somerville is generally 
acknowledged. For many years there have been complaints of 
insufficient water supply, from those living in the highlands of 
the city, and lately the growth of the city has been so rapid that 
these complaints now demand immediate attention. Residents 
in the higher parts of Somerville cannot now, in most cases, get 
a water supply on the second floor of their dwellings, and, in 
many cases, it is impossible for them to get water even on the 
lower floor. To supply their needs, they have been obliged to 
use force-j)umps, wind-mills, and other expensive means for sup- 
plying what ought to be at the command of every resident of 
the city. The injustice of this condition of things is more evi- 
dent, when it is considered that the residents in the higher parts 
of the city are generally wealthy j)eople, who ^slj large taxes, 
and who form the most desirable class of residents in Somerville. 
The growth of the city in the best direction has been hampered 
seriously by the insufficiency of the water supply. Capitalists 
refuse to build on the vacant lands in the higher sections of the 
city, because they know that it is impossible for them to get a 
water supply, and that, consequently, they will be unable to sell 
the buildings which they might erect. If a high water service 
were established, the effect would be immediate. The vacant 
lands in the most desirable parts of Somerville would be taken 
up, expensive dwellings would be erected, people of a desirable 
class would be brought to the city, and the increase of taxable 
property, both personal and real, would be very great. Indeed, 
the increase of income to the city from this source would 
more than make up the cost of the whole system that is 
needed. 



KEPORT OF SOMERVILLE :MTSTIC WATEK-BOAED. 201 

The actual danger that exists, and will continue until the high 
water service is supijlied, is very serious. There are many public 
buildings on high ground in Somerville which are in danger be- 
cause of the lack of sufficient water supply, and the number of 
costly residences that are similarly endangered is very great. 
One extensive fire might do more damage, and cause more loss, 
than the whole cost of the introduction of the high water service, 
and such a fire, under the present conditions, may occur at any 
time. 

The Water Department of Somervdlle now pays a j^rofit to the 
city of more than 847,000 a year, less the expense for interest and 
maintenance. Experience has shown that the extension of the 
water service always results in immediate profit to the city, both 
directly and indirectly, through the increase in the number of 
dwellings, and the consequent increase in taxable property, both 
personal and real. The expense of putting in the high water 
service system would not be great, and the returns would be im- 
mediate and sure. On Winter, Central, Spring, and Prospect 
Hills, there are many thousand dollars' worth of dwelling sites 
now unoccupied, a great many of which would be taken up imme- 
diately, if a sufficient water supply were to be had. The people 
now living in these localities, and on the other highlands of the 
city, already pay a large proportion of the city's taxes, and as a 
matter of common justice they should have at least as good a 
water service as the other residents of Somerville. 

It has been estimated that the cost of the introduction of the 
service would not exceed 875,000. The loss from a single fire 
would more than pay the interest on this amount for a year, and 
the immediate increase of income due to the introduction of the 
system, would refund the money to the city within a very few 
years. At the present time, on Winter and Sj^ring Hills, there 
are many water consumers who pay only half rates for their 
water ser\dce, on acount of the insufficiency of the sujiply. The 
increase in rates, which they would be wilUng to pay if the high 
water service were estabhshed, would be a considerable item. 
The time has come when the demand for the introduction of the 
ser^dce can no longer be disregarded. Even if it were not to be 
a profitable investment, the investment, before long, would have 
to be made. It can be shown, however, that the investment will 



202 A^TXtrAL repokts. 

be a profitable one, and it should be made now, without unneces- 
sary delay. 

Another needed improvement is the extension of the 10-inch 
main on Highland Avenue, from the Brastow Hose House to 
Central Street. This main was provided for in the original plan 
of the works, and is necessary to a free circulation of water 
throughout the present system. The increase in the number of 
houses in that part of the city has been so great, that the main 
must be laid now, without unnecessary delay. Like all other 
extensions of the water service, it will pay its cost to the city 
within a ver}^ few years, by the increase of income which it will 
cause. 

A detailed statement of the workings of the department for 
the year is given in the appended report of Superintendent 
Dennett, which is commended to the consideration of the City 
Council. 

J. O. HAYDEN, 
A. C. WmOT:N"G, 
RICHARD DOWD, 
WALTER S. BARXES, 
JOHN B. YIALL. 



SUPEPJXTEXDEXT'S REPORT. 



To the Somerville Mystic Water Board. 

Gextlemex, — The annual report of the Superintendent of 
the Somer^-ille Mystic Works is respectfully submitted, giving a 
detailed account of all work performed during the year 1888. 
The schedules hereto annexed show the sizes and locations of the 
extensions of main pipe, and of the pipe re-laid ; and also the 
stop-gates, hydrants, and stand-pipes set. The inventory of 
tools and stock on hand is included. 

DISTRIBUTION MAIXS. 

These were extended 10,757 feet, giving a total in the entire 
city of 54 miles, 944 feet. There were re-laid 9,831 feet of iron 
pipe in place of the cement-lined pipe. The work of re-laying 
was done in the most thorough and substantial manner. There 
were seventy-nine breaks on mains, in repairing of which 280 
feet of pipe were used. Of the various sizes, there were twenty- 
four bursts on four-inch, thirty-nine on six-inch, thirteen on eight- 
inch, one on ten-inch pij^e. 

EXTEXSIOXS OF MAIX PIPE. 

Kingman Court, from TTashinoton Street, and runs to a dead 
end, 311 feet, 4-inch pipe. 

Greenville Street, from dead end, near Boston Street, and con- 
nected at Monroe Street, 321 feet, 6-inch joipe. 

Chandler Street, from dead end near Chapel Street, and runs 
toward Broadway, 73 feet, 2-inch pipe. 

Bartlett Street, from Yernon Street, runs to a dead end, 106 
feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Jaques Street, from Wheatland Street, runs towards Temple 
Street, 472 feet, 6-inch 23ipe. 



204 an":n'ual reports. 

Madison Street, from Sycamore Street, runs and is con- 
nected at dead end on Madison Street, 466 feet, 6-inch 
pipe. 

Sycamore Street, from Sycamore Street, dead end, and con- 
nected at Madison Street, 88 feet, 6-inch pij^e. 

Chapel Street, from Elm Street, and connected at Chandler 
Street, 95 feet, 4-inch pipe. 

Preston Street, from dead end, and runs and connected at 
Summer Street, 133 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Elm Street, from dead end, near ChajDel Street, and runs to a 
dead end, Korth, 392 feet, 6-inch pij)e. 

Sewell Street, from Temple Street, and runs to a dead end, 
East, 348 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Carlton Street, from Lake Street, and connected at Somerville 
Avenue, 288 feet, 6 -inch pipe. 

Wheatland Street, from Jaques Street, and runs to a dead end 
at Mystic Avenue, 1,253 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Sidney Street, from Temple Street, and runs to a dead end on 
Sidney Street, 448 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Jerome Street, from Montrose Street, and runs to a dead end 
on Jerome Street, 132 feet, li-inch pipe. 

Delaware Street, from Aldrich Street, and runs to a dead end 
on Aldrich Street, 342 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Medford Street, near School Street, and runs to a dead end on 
Medford Street, 54 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Cook Street, from Wyatt Street, and connects at Adrian Street, 
306 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Adrian Street, from Cook Street, and connects near Marion 
Street, 49 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Ware Street, from Curtis Street, and runs to a dead end, 287 
feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Kensington Street, from Broadway, and runs to a dead end, 
326 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Runey Street, from near Cross Street, and both dead ends 
connected with, 339-i- feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Farragut Avenue, from Holland Street, and runs to a dead end, 
570 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Richdale Avenue, from Sycamore Street, and runs to a dead 
end, 63 feet, 6-inch pipe. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEEIXTEXDEXT OF AVATEE-AVOEKS. 205 

Jenny Lind Avenue, from Medford Street, and runs to a dead 
end, 204 feet, 4-incli pipe. 

Brastow Avenue, from Porter Street, and connects with dead 
end, 165 feet, 4-inch pipe. 

St. James Avenue, from Elm Street, and connects with dead 
end, 142 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Franklin Avenue, from Franklin Street, and connects AA"ith 
dead end, 114 feet, 4-inch pipe. 

Mason Avenue, from Orchard Street, and runs to a dead end, 
205 feet, 2-inch pipe. 

Wilson Avenue, from Broadway, runs to a dead end, 297 feet, 
2 -inch iAi)e. 

EXTEXSIOXS. 

Porter Street, runs from Summer Street to a dead end, 393 
feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Mountain Avenue, runs from Porter Street to a dead end, 
284i feet, 2-inch pipe. 

Fountain Avenue, runs from near Cross Street to a dead end, 
165 feet, 4-inch pipe. 

Tenny Court, pipe is used as a blow-off, and is at the dead 
end, 8 feet, 4-inch pipe. 

Welhngton Avenue, runs from Walnut Street, and is at a dead 
end, 104 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Washington Street, runs from Somerville Avenue, and connects 
with Hawkins Street, 887 feet, 8-inch pipe. 

Holland Street, runs from 10-inch main to connect with 
a new hydrant, located in Davis Square, 15 J feet, 6-inch 
pipe. 

Hawthorn Street, runs from dead end and connects A^dth 
West Street, 46 feet, 1-inch pipe. 

Landers Street, runs from School Street, to a dead end, 200 
feet, 2-inch pipe. 

Franklin Street, runs from the main to supply hydrant, 9 feet, 
6-inch pipe. 

West Street, runs from Hawthorn Street to a dead end, near 
Highland Avenue, 255 feet, li-iuch j^ipe. 

Total number of feet extended, 10,757^. 



206 ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 



STKEETS RE-LAID. 



Pearl Street, running from Cross toward Walnut, a distance 
of 462i feet, 6-inch pipe in place of 4-inch. 

Merriam Street, running from Somerville Avenue toward 
Charlestown, a distance of 567 feet, 6-inch j^ipe in place of 
4-inch. 

Hawkins Street, running from Washington to Somerville 
Avenue, a distance of 417 feet, 6-inch pipe in place of 3-inch. 

Somerville Avenue, running from Medford to junction of 
Washington, a distance of 1,563 feet, 8-inch pipe in place of 
6-inch. 

Franklin Street, running from Washington to Oliver, a dis- 
tance of 799 feet, 8-inch pipe in place of 6-inch. 

Oliver Street, running from Franklin, a distance of twenty 
feet. 

Morrison Street, running from Willow Avenue to Elm, a dis- 
tance of 1,765 feet, 6-inch pipe in place of 4-inch. 

Everett Street, from Prospect to Webster Avenue, a distance 
of 419 feet, 6-inch pipe in place of 4-inch. 

Emerson Street, running from Everett to ISTewton, a distance 
of 205 feet, 6-incli pipe in place of 4-inch. 

24 feet of this was 6-inch, and 181 feet of 4-inch. 

N^ewton Street, from Prospect to Everett, a distance of 92 
feet, 6-inch pipe in place of 4-inch. 

Prospect Street, running from Somerville Avenue to near 
Newton, a distance of 167 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Bond Street, running from Temple to City Ledge, a distance 
of 631 feet, and lowered to 4^. 

Lake Street, running from Hawkins to West, a distance of 42 
feet. 

Beacon Street, running from Park to Kent, and thence from 
near Sacramento Street to F. R. R. Bridge, a distance of 2,567^ 
feet. 

Sacramento Street, running from Beacon Street to Cambridge 
line, 53 feet. 

Kent Street, running from Beacon Street, North, 21i feet. 

Ivaloo Street, running from Beacon Street, North, 6-inch in 
place of 4-inch, 20 feet. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERIXTEXDE^'T OF WATER-WOEKS. 207 

Sacramento Street, running from Beacon Street, Xorth, 20 
feet. 

Fremont Street, running from Main Street to a dead end, 256 
feet, 6-incli in place of 3-inch. 

Total 9,831-1 feet. 

Fremont Street to be added in, 256 " 



10,087i " 

In reply to an inquiry of your Board, I have to say, that, after 
careful consideration, I find the general condition of the pipe in 
the following-named streets to be such that its velajing must 
become a question for early consideration : — 

Beacon Street, from Washington Street to Cambridge Line, 
distance of 1,925 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Vine Street, from Washington Street to Railroad, distance of 
200 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Bow Street, from Summer Street to Somerv^ille Avenue, dis- 
tance of 760 feet, 8-inch pipe. 

Warren Avenue, from Bow Street to Columbus^ Avenue, dis- 
tance of 716 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Washington Street, from opposite Drinking Fountain, to Bow 
Street, distance of 880 feet, 8-inch jDipe. 

Vinal Avenue, from Highland Avenue to Summer Street, 
distance of 970 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

School Street, from Summer Street to Somerville Avenue, 
distance of 980 feet, 6-inch j^ipe. 

Medford Street, from* Somei^ille Avenue to East Cambridge 
Line, distance of 1,570 feet, 8-inch pipe. 

Sacramento Street, from Beacon Street to Somerville Avenue, 
distance of 471 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Allen Street, from Somerville Avenue to Charlestown Street, 
distance of 700 feet, 6-inch j^ipe. 

Lake Street, from Hawkins Street to distance of 415 feet, 
6 -inch pipe. 

Cross Street, from Everett Street to Flint Street, distance of 
700 feet, 6-inch pipe. 

Ohver Street, from Franklin Street to Cross Street, distance 
of 1,100 feet, 6-inch pipe. 



208 A]SrNLTAL EEPOETS. 

The following gates were set on mains extended during the 
year : — 

Greenville Street, No. Corner Boston Street, 1 6-inch gate. 

» " So. "- " "1 4-inch " 

Bartlett " " Vernon " 1 6-inch " 

Preston " " Summer " 1 6-inch " 

Elm " Opposite Chaj^el " 1 6-inch " 

Sewall " Corner Temj^le " 1 6-inch " 

Wheatland " " Jaques " 1 6-inch " 

" " " Mystic Avenue 1 6-inch " 

Ware " " Curtis " 1 6-inch " 

Kensington " " Broadway, 1 6-inch " 

Mason Avenue, " Orchard Street, 1 2-inch " 

Wilson " " Broadway, 1 2-inch 

Jenny Lind Avenue, " Medf ord Street, 1 4-inch 

St. James " " Elm " 1 6-inch 

Franklin " " Franklin " 1 4-inch 

Porter Street, " Summer " 1 6-inch 

Cook " • " Wyatt " 1 6-inch 

Beacon "• near Sacramento " 1 6-inch 



Carlton Street, corner Lake " 1 6-inch " 



" " " Somerville Avenue, 1 6-inch " 

Sidney " " Temple Street, 1 6-inch " 

Jerome " " Montrose " 1 2-inch " 

Chapel " " Elm " 1 4-inch " 

Tenny Court, at Dead End, 1 4-inch " 

Kingman Court, corner Washington Street, 1 6-inch " 



On account of relaying pipe the following changes were made 
in gates : — 

Pearl Street, corner Cross Street, 4-inch gate changed to 6-inch. 

Merriam Street, corner Somerville Avenue, 4-inch gate changed 
to 6-inch. 

Hawkins Street, corner Washington Street, 3-inch gate changed 
to 6-inch. 

Hawkins Street, corner Somerville Avenue, 3-inch gate changed 
to 6-inch. 

Oliver Street, corner Franklin Street, 4-inch gate changed to 
6-inch. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEEIXTEXDEXT OF WATEE-WORKS. 209 

Morrison Street, corner "Willow Avenue, 4-incli gate changed 
to 6-inch. 

Morrison Street, corner Elm Street, 4-inch gate changed to 
6-inch. 

Everett Street, comer "Webster Avenue, 4-inch gate changed 
to 6-inch. 

Everett Street, corner Xewton Street, 4-inch gate changed to 
6-inch. 

Lake Street, corner Hawkins Street, 4-inch gate changed to 
6-inch. 

Somerville Avenue, corner Prospect Street, 6-inch gate changed 
to 8 -inch. 

Franklin Street, corner Washington Street, 6-inch gate changed 
to 8-inch. 

Ivaloo Street, corner Beacon Street, 4-inch gate changed to 
6-inch. 

All the gates and gate-boxes were inspected and repairs made, 
as follows : — 

129 gates, found leaking, were repacked. 

40 new boxes were set in place of decayed ones. 

33 boxes have been raised and lowered to conform with grade 
530 gates are in service to date. 

The following hydrants have been set and located as fol- 
lows : — 

One on Farragut Avenue, near Holland Street. 
" " " Cambridge line. 

Holland Street, " Dover Street. 

" dead end. 
opposite Williams Street, 
near City Ledge. 
" Palmer Avenue. 
" Jaques Street. 
" Mystic Avenue, 
between Wheatland and Temple Streets, 
opposite Lake Street. 
" Washington Street, corner Kingman Court. 
Beacon " opposite Harris Street. 



' " Weare 

' " Elm 

' '' Bond 

' " Franklin 

' " Wheatland 

' " Jaques 

' " Hawkins 



210 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

One on Somerville Avenue, corner Union Square. 
" " Washington Street, at Dodge's Blacksmith Shop. 
" " Kingman Court, " Fitchburg Raih'oad. 

Nine of the old disk hydrants were found frozen, and thawed 
out, and four of them were burst beyond repairs, and four new 
ones set in their places. Twenty-six have been dug up and 
wastes repaired, and new valves put in. The hydrants have 
received the usual attention, especially during the extreme cold 
season, when they then required constant supervision, particu- 
larly those of the disk pattern, and no complaint, on account of 
freezing or disarrangement, was received from the Fire Depart- 
ment. The hydrant in Somerville Avenue, corner of Prospect 
Street, was discontinued. The large four-way, located in Davis 
Square fountain, was found to be broken in the post, and, upon 
consulting with the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, it 
was deemed advisable to take it out, as it being liable to be 
broken at any time, by heavy stone teams, and a large 6-inch 
Chapman set at the corner of Dover Street, in its place. Twelve 
have been taken out, and, at the shop, received general repairs, 
and new ones set in their place. There are, in the city, 375 
hydrants : Boston Machine, 128 ; Bigelow, 21 ; Chapman, 68 ; Hol- 
yoke, 101 ; Matthews, 12 ; Newport, 1 ; Flush, 10 ; Lowry, 2. 
Total, 375. 

SEEYICES. 

Four hundred and fourteen have been laid, at an average cost 
of $18.04, making the total number to date of 5,410, making a 
total length of 35 miles, 1,005 feet ; 57 were put in to replace old 
ones, a number being too small, others being filled up with rust 
sediment and other causes; 271 were cleared of rust sediment; 143 
were stopped by frost. There were 51 leaks, of which 29 were 
brokenleads, 8 by setting of trenches, 6 by pick holes, 3 by defec- 
tive couplings, 5 by defective soldering; 108 have been dug up and 
re-tapped at corporation ; 55 iron boxes have been set to replace 
old decayed wooden ones ; 39 that have given great trouble and 
expense on account of freezing, have been lowered, and no repe- 
tition of the evil will occur as in the past. 18 have been fur- 



REPORT OF THE SUPEEIXTEXDEXT OF TVATEE-WOEKS . 211 

nished with new iron boxes and side-walk stops ; 15 have had 
new stop and wastes, and general repairs. 

STAXD-PIPES. 

Xo new ones were set the past year. More are needed to 
meet the increasing demands of the street sprinkling. The one 
on Broadway, opposite, has been discontinued, by order of High- 
way Committee. The number in use is twenty-five ; thirteen 
have had new packing, and other repairs, to the amount of 
$30.03. 

DRIXKIXG FOUXTAIXS. • 

These have had the usual care. The one on the corner of 
School and Medford Streets was removed to opposite side of the 
street, at an expense of $28.15, The large fountain in Davis 
Square, having been knocked from its foundation by hea\'y stone 
teams, it has been re-set and raised fourteen inches, secured by 
one-inch iron bolts, and a brick inside wall, laid in Portland 
cement, at an expense of $58.50. The one on Broadway, oppo- 
site the Park, has been re-set, and had other repau's to amount 
of $9,50 ; is now in good order. 



MISCELLAXEOrS. 

In the shops, 460 services were cut and fitted, 534 lead con- 
nections were made, 17,283 feet of 1-inch and li-inch pipe, were 
lined ; gates and gate-boxes and hydrants were repaired, and all 
incidental work performed. 

STOCK AVAILABLE FOE FUTUEE USE TO JAX. 1, 1889. 

Cast-iron pipe $1,818 00 

Cement-lined pipe . 
Special castings 
Gates and hydrants 
Sundry fittinsfs and mateiial 
Service pipe 
Service material 

$4,299 33 



190 


00 


614 


49 


590 


00 


233 


41 


340 


15 


513 


28 



212 



AI^'NUAL REPORTS. 



TOOLS AND FURNITURE. 

Tools for water- works 

" " service 
Furniture for stable department 

" " office 

Special patterns 

Respectfully submitted, 



$640 


35 


386 


70 


1,176 


50 


271 


00 


250 


00 



$2,724 55 



NATHANIEL DENNETT, 

Siq^ 6 rin tendent. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldekmex, March 13, 1889. 

Eeferred to the committee on printing, to he printed in the annual re- 
ports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEOKGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, March 13, 1889. 

Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. KOBEETSON, Clerk. 



BOARD OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Hox. Ma-Rk F. Burns, Chairman ex-officio. 
Col. Herbert E. Hill .... 
Mr. Edward B. West .... 
Mr. Daniel C. Stillson 
Mr. Charles G. Brett, President 



Ward One. 
Ward Two. 
Ward Three. 
Ward Four. 



COMMITTEES: 

On Investigation and Belief . . Messrs. Brett and West. 



On Finance 



Messrs. Hill aad Stillson. 



Charles C. Folsom, General Agent, 
Frank W. Kaan, Secretary. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



To the IIo7iorable the City Council of Somerville. 

GEN^TLEMEiiT, — At tliG request of the Overseers of the Poor, 
the General Agent has submitted to them his report of the work 
of this department for the year 1888. This report, together with 
the accompanying tables, they adopt as their official report. 

CHARLES G. BRETT, President. 
HERBERT E. HILL. 
EDWARD B. WEST. 
DANIEL C. STILLSOX. 



REPORT OF THE GEXERAL AGEXT. 



To the Mayor and Board of Overseers of the Poor. 

Gextlemex, — I have the honor to submit to you the follow- 
ing report for the year 1888 : 

The net expenses of this department have been $11,082.91 ; 
the gross expenses, $13,375.98, di^dded as follows: House rents, 
$1,294.00. 

We are at present paying rent for twenty-one families, eighteen 
of which are composed of ^dclows, most of whom haye children. 
In the other three there are old men who are unable to work by 
reason of old age or sickness. The highest rent is $7.00 a month ; 
the lowest, $4.00 ; the ayerage, $4.71. We haye stopped paying 
rent for fiye families during the year on the ground that the chil- 
dren were old enough to earn something toward their support. 
The last part of the year there haye been com2)aratiyely few ap- 
plications for the payment of rent, as it is generally understood 
that the Board does not intend to be responsible for rent except 
in extreme cases. Other cities and towns do not pay rents to any 
great extent. I think the number can be still further reduced the 
coming year. 

Board in Priyate Families, . . . $1,371.77 

We haye had during the year boarding in priyate families 
twenty-one persons, thu'teen of them the entii'e year. The highest 
price paid per week was $3.25 ; the lowest, $1.00, being for 
children with relatiyes and for one adult who was able to work 
somewhat. The ayerage price was about $2.50 per week. One 
person was in Boston ; one at Cape Rosier, Maine ; the others in 
Someryille. 

Other Cities and Towns, . . . $1,631.36 

Sixteen families haying settlements in Someryille, but hying in 
other cities and towns, were aided at then- homes dming the year 



218 a:n^nual reports. 

and the expense was charged to us. In addition, twelve persons 
having settlements in Somerville were supported the whole or 
part of the year in the almshouses of other cities and towns, and 
the cost of their support also was charged to us. Public institu- 
tions, $4,545.38. 

This class also includes Insane Hospitals, State Almshouse, 
School for Feeble Minded, Reform School, House of Correction, 
and any private hospital for the sick. 



I]S^SAKE HOSPITALS. 

The city has paid for the support of thirty insane persons, 
twenty-two who were in hospitals last January being there now. 
Some have died, or have been discharged, and others have been 
sent to take their places. At present there are twenty-six. Of 
this number three have some property and the city is reimbursed 
by their guardians. The price for the support of insane persons 
is fixed by law at $3.25 per week. Previous to 1888 cities and 
towns, in addition to this amount, paid for clothing furnished 
patients and for all damage done by them. During the past year 
no city or town has paid charges of this kind, although the trus- 
tees of the Danvers Hospital still send bills for "clothing and 
breakage." The solicitors of the several cities, and the Attorney 
General, are of the opinion that the word " support" in the stat- 
ute covers the entire expense. Application was made to the legis- 
lature last winter by the trustees of the hospitals to have the laws 
changed so that they could collect charges for necessary clothing 
and breakage, but no change was made. Another effoit will 
probably be made by them this winter for the same object. An 
association composed of secretaries and agents of overseers of the 
poor of cities and large towns has been formed, and it is very 
helpful, foi it enables us to have a general understanding in all 
matters pertaining to the settlement laws, and to work in harmony 
and unison. 

When a patient is committed to a hospital your agent looks 
up his history carefully, and, if he has not acquired a settlement 
in Somerville, we do not pay for his support ; and if there is 
any reasonable way of collecting from relatives what we have 
paid out, every effort is made to do so. 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 219 



STATE ALMSHOrSE AT TEWKSBURY. 

There is one person in this institution for whom the city pays 
board. She has been there for several years, and is classed as 
" harmless insane." The cost of her support has been $2.80 per 
week. I have given permits, and the city has paid the expenses 
of seven persons to the State Almshouse during the year. The ^e 
persons were all State paupers, and were sent at their own 
request. 

SCHOOL FOR FEEBLE-MINDED, SOUTH BOSTON. 

A boy seven years old has been in the school during the 
entire year, and I see no prospect of his being discharged at 
present or in the near future. The cost is the same as in insane 
cases, $3.25 per week. 

HOUSE OF CORRECTIOX. 

The city is obliged by law to pay. the county for board of 
persons committed under Chap. 207, Sec. 29, of the Public 
Statutes, provided such persons have a settlement in Somerville. 
The charge for board in these cases is 81.60 per week; and we 
have been allowed for then- work, .60 ; leaving a balance for the 
city to pay of $1.00 a week. It has also been the custom for 
the county to send bills for the board of persons committed for 
vagrancy. Xot being satisfied that the city was liable for such 
persons, I obtained the opinion of the city solicitor, which was 
to the effect that we were not liable for the board of such per- 
sons as were committed for vagrancy under Chap. 207, Sec. 42, 
Pub. Stats. We now have an unpaid bill of $13.18 from the 
county for the board of a person committed under this law. 

CARXEY HOSPITAL, SOUTH BOSTON. 

Permits have been given to several sick persons to enter 
Carney Hospital. Arrangements were made with the superin- 
tendent more than a year ago, to receive at a reduced rate 
patients sent from this city by the Overseers of the Poor. This 
has been a great convenience, as we have no place of our own 
where they can be cared for. 



220 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



GROCEKIES AND PROVISIONS, $1,725.56. 

Formerly a store was kept in the rear of the Police Building, 
for giving out these goods to paupers ; but, as most of them were 
either old or feeble, and as we did not have facilities for deliver- 
ing the goods, it was thought best to discontinue the store, and 
give orders on reliable stores in different parts of the city ; in all 
cases, unless otherwise ordered, conforming to the following list 
of articles : flour ; rye, oat, corn, and graham meal ; potatoes, 
bread, crackers, rice, beans, fresh meat for soup, salt beef, pork, 
fish, molasses, salt, soap, and a small amount of tea and sugar. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, $164.65. 

In most cases, where boots and shoes have been given out, 
they have been given so that children could attend the public 
schools. I have refused to give them in some cases (when 
perhaps the children really needed them) when asked to do so 
by teachers or the truant officer, where the parents were not 
paupers and did not ask aid from the city. 

DRY GOODS AND CLOTHING, $47.05. 

A very small amount has been expended under this head. 
Orders have been given only when help of this kind seemed 
strictly necessary. 

BURIALS, $175.15. 

Orders were given for the burial of fourteen persons. It 
would be a great convenience to have a cemetery near by in 
which the city owned a lot, for the burial of paupers. 

rUEL, $677.60. 

Wood and coal have been given during the winter to a large 
extent. It seems to me that aid in this way really helps more 
than in any other. If a family of children can be kej^t warm in 
winter, their friends, in most cases, will supply them with food. 
The custom has been to give a quarter of a ton of coal and a 
half a foot of wood each month, from November to March 
inclusive. We have given a little in the summer, in cases of 
sickness. 



REPORT OF OYEKSEEES OF THE POOR. 221 

I would suggest the expediency of purchasing a few cords of 
hard wood in the autumn, and having it housed in some con- 
venient place. Where a family in which there is a man calls for 
aid, as is frequently the case, let him work for what aid they re- 
ceive. This plan has been successful in other cities, and will in 
most cases prevent coming for help except when it is really 
needed. Arrangements could be made to dispose of the pre- 
pared wood, so that the city would be financially the gainer in 
the end. 

SALERIES, SI ,450. 

The amount paid for salaries is only $50.00 more than it was 
prior to 1885, when the law governing the Overseers of the Poor 
was changed. The General Agent receives $1,200, and the 
Secretary, $250. 

SU:J^DRIES, $289.46. 

This item includes the travelling expenses of the General 
Agent, cash paid to paupers, stationery, &c: 

GEisTTLEMEiir OF THE BoARD, — It aff ords me great pleasure 
to thank you for your uniform courtesy, and for the readiness on 
your part to give me your support and advice in all matters 
brought before you for consideration. I will refer you to the 
statistical tables, prepared by the Secretary, for further infor- 
mation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. C. FOLSOM, Gejieral Agent. 



222 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE NO. 1. 

PARTIAL SUPPORT (OUT-DOOR RELIEF). 

Families aided during the year . . . . . .191 

Persons " " » " 761 

Persons having a settlement in Somerville . . . 387 

" " " " other cities and towns . 201 

" " no settlement, chargeable in part to 

the State 173 

Persons aided in other cities and towns chargeable to 

Somerville . . . . . . . .40 



TABLE :N^0. 2. 

FULL SUPPORT. 



During the whole year 

" part of the year 
Sane 
Insane 

In almshouses . 
In private families 
In Boston hospitals 



Xo. of 
Persons. 

39 
29 
38 
30 
12 
17 
10 



TABLE NO. 3. 



Pay Rolls for 


1884. 


1885. 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


January . . 


$2,913 20 


$2,578 43 


$3,296 01 


$2,769 44 


$3,139 51 


February . . 


980 45 


1,198 38 


965 30 


834 62 


852 68 


March . . . 


1,487 43 


2,293 47 


908 12 


1,296 90 


1,245 99 


April . . . 


1,716 54 


1,400 97 


1,805 75 


1,073 43 


1,035 71 


May . . . 


718 23 


639 81 


662 41 


691 49 


523 61 


June . . . 


1,750 43 


1,211 58 


972 22 


927 13 


1,480 64 


July . . . 


1,415 09 


2,373 39 


1,663 89 


1,500 01 


883 96 


August . . 


1,231 11 


710 83 


590 00 


510 11 


755 07 


September . 


2,072 35 


898 50 


774 84 


1,431 86 


1,571 43 


October . . 


1,023 72 


1,773 42 


1,395 11 


725 01 


678 14 


November 


928 79 


434 94 


669 28 


696 69 


727 12 


December 


1,135 18 


916 60 


638 90 


974 20 


478 12 


Total, . . 


$17,272 52 


$16,430 32 


$14,341 83 


$13,430 89 


$13,375 98 



EEPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



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ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE NO. 5. 

RECEIPTS FROM VARIOUS SOURCES FOR THE SUPPORT OF PAUPERS. 

Comnionwealtli of Massachusetts 
City of Boston . 
" Cambridge 
" Fall River 
•• Lowell . 
" Lawrence 
" Salem . 
" Taunton 
Town of Arlington 
" Brookline 

Groton 
" Leominster 
Manchester 
Stoneham 
" Sandwich 
" Woburn 
Guardians and relatives of paupers and insane persons, 

Total _ . . $2,293 07 



$609 


24 


397 


60 


101 


01 


3 


25 


33 


90 


9 


35 


43 


10 


8 


00 


35 


60 


29 


50 


11 


90 


20 


15 


49 


50 


26 


15 


12 


40 


60 


30 


842 


12 



TABLE :N'0. 6. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Received from the Commonwealth, cities, towns, 

and individuals 
Appropriation 
Total receipts 
Total expenditures 
Balance 
Net expenditures 



$2,293 07 
14,000 00 
16,293 07 
13,375 98 
2,917 09 
11,082 91 



FRANK W. KAAN, Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Boakd of Aldekmen, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual re- 
ports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Feb. 18, 1889. 

Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Boakd of Health, City Hall, 
SoMERViLLE, MASS., Jan. 30, 1889. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council. 

Gentle ^FEX, — Agreeably with law and usage the Board of 

Health presents herewith its eleventh annual report, consisting 

of a condensed statement of the sanitary conditions of Somer- 

ville, and the doings of the Board during the year ending Dec. 

31, 1888. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Mr. George C. Skilton, after seven years of honorable service, 
retired from the Board Feb. 6, he having changed his 
residence to Bedford, Mass. April 11, Albion A. Perry was 
appointed by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen a member of 
the Board, but declined to serve. April 25, Charles H. Crane 
was appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen a member of the 
Board for the remainder of the current year, and for the year 
commencing the first Monday in February, 1889, and at once 
entered upon the duties of the office. 

ORGAXIZATIOX. 

The Board organized May 2, by electing officers as follows : — 

Chairman^ Thomas M. Durell, M.D. 

Clerk, Geoege I. Yixcent. 

Mr. William H. Brine, (40 Houghton Street), continued to 
serve as Inspector until May 14. 

May 29, the name of Caleb A. Page, a war veteran, having, at 
the request of the Board, been certified by the civil service 
examiners for the office of Inspector, the Board proceeded to 
the election of an Inspector, which resulted in the choice of 
Caleb A. Page. 



228 



AiN'NUAL REPORTS. 



NUISANCES. 

The tabulated method of reporting nuisances abated is con- 
tinued in this report ; the arrangement being by the months 
when the complaints were received. 

N^UISA^s^CES ABATED I>f THE YEAR 1888. 



Bedding used in Typhoid 
Fever on premises . . . 

Cellar damp 

Cesspool defective .... 
" offensive . . . . 
" overflowing . . . 

Connections of drainage 
pipes defective .... 

Cows kept in basement of 
house 

Drainage defective .... 
" emptying into cel- 
lar , . 

Drainage emptying on sur- 
face 

Drainage not ventilated . . 

Drain -pipe defective . . . 

Drying hair, offensive . . . 

Furnace without cold-air 
hox 

Hennery offensive . • . . 

Hens kept in cellar . • . . 
" " privy .... 

Manure exposed and offen- 
sive 

Offal on land 

Offensive odor in and about 
dwellings 

Opening "in drain-j)ipe in 
cellar . 

Premises filthy 

" untidy 

Privj^-vault defective . . . 

" fuU 

" offensive . . . 

Slaughtering " ... 

Slops thrown on surface . . 

Stable and stable premises 
filthy and offensive . . . 

Stagnant water in house 
cellar 

Stagnant water on sui-face . 

Waste-pipe defective . . . 
" not trapped . . 

Water-closet defective . . 
" insufficiently 

supplied wdth water . . ". 

Water-closet not supplied 
with water 

Water-closet offensive . . 

Wooden waste-pipes and 
drains 

Total 



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5 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


2 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


10 


3 


- 


2 


1 


1 


_ 


- 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


4 


11 


9 


5 


1 


4 


_ 


4 


- 


1 


- 


- ■ 


1 


2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


- 


2 


2 


- 


4 


1 


1 


- 


- 


3 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


2 


1 


1 


- 


4 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


38 


1 
57 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


45 


30 


82 


59 


39 


80 


24 


23 


15 


5 



1 

19 
5 
2 

7 

16 

2 
46 

19 

19 

19 

4 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 

21 
6 



1 
17 
12 

8 
55 
82 

1 

3 



6 
18 

3 
39 
11 

12 

5 
12 

2 

497 



Including nuisances referred to us by the Board of 1887. 



EEPOET OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 229 

Number of nuisances abated ..... 497 

" " " referred to the Board of 1889 lt>7 

" " " complained of . . . 604 
" " complaints (many covering more than 

one nuisance) . . . . . . 318 

" of tenements ordered vacated ... 25 

" " same since made habitable . . . 23 
" " " vacated in compliance Tvith our 

orders ....... 1 

Number of notices mailed ...... 327 

" " " served by constables . . . 18 

" " letters wi'itten 9 

Verbal notices from the Inspector have, in many cases, led to 
the abatement of nuisances without further action. 

Private Streets. — In our last report we called attention 
to the bad sanitary condition of some of the private streets. It 
is true the city is not responsible for their maintenance ; but, as 
concerted action by the abutters can hardly be expected, good 
judgment would seem to require that they be cared for suffi- 
ciently, at least, to protect the public health. This can often 
times be done at very little outlay, by levelling the surface with 
surplus materials of no value. 

Dane Court has been put in good order during the past year 
by the Highway Department, at our request. A neighboring 
street was being graded and the surplus filling was spread in the 
court and covered with ashes. 

South and Willow Streets have also been improved by the 
same department, by placing several hundred loads of gravel 
thereon. A serious nuisance, to which attention was called in 
the last annual report of this Board, has thus been abated. 

Chestnut Street, extending eastwardly from Poplar Street, 
still needs attention, and also Franklin Avenue, near Franklin 
Street, the difficulty in the avenue being due chiefly to the 
flow of water from Franklin Street, for which a catch basin 
should be provided. 

PERMITS. 

Deeming that the density of the population in many sections 
of the city required some restriction upon the keeping of cows. 



230 ANNNAL REPORTS. 

the following regulations were adopted May 2, and publislied in 
the three following issues of the Somerville Journal and the 
Somerville Sentinel : 

KEGULATIONS CONCEKNING COWS. 

In Board of Health of the City of Somerville, 

May 2d, 1888. 

Ordered : That on and after July 1st, 1888, no person shall keep, or allow 
to be kept, within the limits of the City in any building, or on any prem- 
ises, of which he may be the owner, lessee, tenant, or occupant, more than 
one cow, without a written permit from the Board of Health. Every 
person keeping a cow shall cause the place where it is kept to be well ven- 
tilated and drained, and kept at all times in a cleanly and wholesome con- 
dition. Such permit may be revoked at any time when such revocation 
shall appear to the Board to be necessary for the public health and safety. 
All such permits shall expire on the first day of May annually. 

A true copy of regulations passed by the Board of Health of Somerville, 
May 2, 1888. 

Attest: GEOKGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 

Since the adoption of these regulations several parties who 
kept large numbers of cows have either gone out of the business 
or removed elsewhere. One party has been prosecuted for 
keeping cows without a permit, and conviction secured. 

Applications for permits to keep cows, swine, and goats, to 
collect grease and to remove manure, have been disposed of as 
follows : — ' ' 

Cows. — Applications were received from 65 parties for per- 
mits to keep 319 cows. Permits were granted to 55 parties for 
257, and were refused for the balance. ISTo fee. 

Swine. — Applications received for 198 ; permits granted for 
194 and refused for 4. Fee, 11.00 for each swine. 

Goats. — Applications received for 22 and they were all 
granted. Fee, $1.00 for each goat. 

Grease. — ISTumber of applications received, 5; all of which 
were granted. Fee, $2.00. One of the applicants resided in 
Boston and the others were citizens of Somerville. An inspec- 
tion of the wagons is made monthly. We learn from the Board 
of Health of Boston and Cambridge that 15 Somerville parties 
were licensed during the year to collect grease in the former 
city, and 4 in the latter. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 231 

Manure. — AVe have granted 14 permits to haul manure 
through the streets of the city in the day time between May 1 
and Dec. 1, and 16 permits to remove manure from stables 
within the city, during the same period, and convey it through 
the streets, under the restrictions stated in our last report. 

PEDLERS. 

In pursuance of ordinance Xo. 40, entitled " Hawkers and 
Pedlers," 102 certificates of record have been given to pedlers 
of goods in our streets. This number is in addition to the 187 
who received such certificates last year, but a great many of 
them have given up the business. 

A monthly inspection is made at the Police Building, to see 
that the name and number are properly painted on the wagon 
and tiiat the wagon is kept clean. 

ASHES. 

The contract with Jeremiah McCarthy for the removal of 
ashes expired April 29. 

The collections up to that time had been once a week in each 
ward ; but in the more densely populated wards, especially Ward 
Two, it had been found imj^racticable to collect all the ashes in 
one day. Accordingly new districts, to take effect with the new 
contract, were established as follows : — 

District 1. Bes^inning: at the Boston line and bounded by 
the northerly line of Washington Street, the westerly line of 
Prospect Street, the northerly line of Concord Avenue extended 
across Beacon Street to the Cambridgje line, and by the Cam- 
bridge and Boston lines. 

District 2. Beginning at the Boston line, and bounded by 
the northerly line of Washington Street, the easterly lines of 
Medford and Cross Streets (the latter prolonged to the Mystic 
River), Mystic River and the Boston line. 

District 3. Beginning at the junction of Cross and Medford 
Streets, and bounded by the easterly line of Medford Street, 
the northerly line of Highland Avenue, the easterly line of 
Cedar Street prolonged to the Medford line, the Medford line. 
Mystic River, and the easterly line of Cross Street prolonged to 
the river. 



232 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

District 4. Beoinniiio- at the iutersectiou of Medford and 
Washington Streets, and bounded by the northerly Ime of 
Washington Street, the westerly line of Prospect Street, the 
northerly line of Somerville Ayenue, the easterly lines of Moss- 
land and Cedar Streets, the northerly line of Highland ayenue, 
and the easterly line of Medford Street. 

District 5. Beginning at the intersection of Prospect Street 
and Someryille Ayenue, and bounded by the westerly line of 
Prospect Street, the northerly line of Concord Ayenue prolonged 
to the Cambridge line, the Cambridge line (extending west- 
war dly) and the northerly line of Someryille Ayenue. 

District 6. All of that portion of the city lying west of the 
easterly lines of Cedar and Mossland Streets. 

It will be seen by these descriptions that the side lines of 
streets are used as boundaries, and not the middle lines ; so that 
ashes are remoyed from the sidewalks on both sides of the 
street on the same day. 

In response to solicitations published in the Someryille Journal 
of April 14, and mailed to yarious parties, proposals to remove 
ashes during the year commencing April 30, were receiyed as 
follows : from 

Martin Gill $2,700 

T. F. Crimmings . . . . 2,575 

Jeremiah McCarthy .... 2,575 

John P. Downey "^ . . . . 2,490 

and the contract was awarded to John P. Downey, he furnishing 
a bond, with sureties, in the sum of three thousand dollars. 

The collections are made on the f olloAying named days : — 

Monday in District 1. 

Tuesday in District 2. 

Wednesday in District 3. 

Thursday in District 4. 

Friday in District 5. 

Saturday in District 6. 

The collector is required to remoye all ashes, rubbish, and 
house dirt (free from filth and offal) that is placed in barrels or 
boxes on the outer edge of the sidewalk before 8 o'clock A.M. of 
the day for collection. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 233 



HOUSE OFFAL. 

House offal has been collected by Henry Gray, under a three- 
years' contract dating from June 26, 1886, for the sum of nine 
hundred dollars per annimi. 

He is required to make the collections at least once every 
week in December, January, Februai'y and March : twice a week 
in April, October, and November, and three times per week in 
the five remaining;; months. 

The contractor informs us that about four hundred and fifty 
cords were collected durino; the year. 

NIGHT SOIL. 

Nisfht soil has been removed durino- the year by 3Ir. R. ^L 
Johnson of Arlington; his contract, which expired Feb. 1, 
1888, ha\dng been renewed for three years. Orders are taken 
at the Police Station on Bow Street, and at Knowles Bros/ 
grocery store on the corner of Perkins and Franklin Streets. 
The removal is made by the " odorless " process, and the price is 
four dollars for every load, or part of a load, of eighty cul>ic 
feet. 

We are informed by the contractor that 568 loads have been 
removed in the year 1888. 

SEWERS. 

In the last two reports of this board, the necessitj^ for 
sewers in Madison, Montrose, and Woodbine Streets has been 
noted. We understand that petitions for sewers have been 
presented to the Board of Aldermen by the owners on the 
two streets first named, and we hoj^e they will be favorably 
considered. The soil is a heavy clay, and the land slopuig, so 
that a great part of the sewage runs on the surface. In Wood- 
bine Street the land is wet, and a sewer is needed both for house 
and surface drainage. A sewer should also be laid in Kent 
Court. The preliminary steps for this sewer were taken last 
year, but final action was postponed, because a few of the abut- 
ters objected on account of the expense. The neighborhood is 
thickly settled and the land flat, and cesspools are inadequate. 



234 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



DEATHS. 
The number of deaths in the city in 1888 was 601, and there 
were 25 still-births. 

MORTALITY IN SOMERVILLE IN 1888. 



ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 

Miasmatic. 



Scarlet fever . . 
Diphtheria . . . 

Croup 

Typhoid fever . . 
Erysipelas . . . 
Diarrhoea . . . . 
Cholera infantum 
Septicaemia . . . 
Whooping cough . 
Measles . . . . 
Dysentery . . . 
Malarial fever . . 
Remittant fever . 
Rheumatism . . 



CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 

Diathetic. 
Cancer of womb 



Cancer 

Cancer of liver 

Cancer of stomach . . . 

Tubercular. 

Tubercular meningitis 
Tuberculosis 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Nervous System. 

Apoplexy 

Paralysis 

Insanity 

Brain disease 

Meningitis ...... 

Convulsions 

Locomotor ataxia . . . 
Spinal disease 

Organs of Circulation. 
Heart disease 



Respiratory Organs. 

Pneumonia 

Bronchitis 

Hemorrhage 

Phthisis pulmonalis . . 
Pleurisy . . . . . . 

Asthma 

Digestive Organs. 

Gastritis 

Peritonitis 

Liver disease 

Obstruction of bowels . . 



^ 



11 



10 



be 



3 
13 

1 

1 



15 

21 
9 

17 
1 
9 

35 
8 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 



3 

14 

1 

5 



14 

22 

5 

12 

23 

7 

1 

1 



45 



62 

14 

5 

81 

1 

1 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



235 



MORTALITY IX soMERviLLE IX 1888 — Continued. 







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eJD 

< 


CO 


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o 

O 


a 
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o 
H 


Genlto- Uriaanj Organs. 




























Bright's disease 


8 


3 


3 


6 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


1 


- 


1 


2 


28 


Diabetes 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


Cystitis 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Nephritis 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 




























Of Children. 




























Marasmus 


_ 


4 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


4 


3 


6 


_ 


1 


27 


Premature birth and infan- 




























tile debility 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


2 


2 


- 


4 


2 


16 


Of Old People. 




























Old age 


2 


_ 


3 


1 


5 


- 


- 


2 


6 


1 


2 


3 


25 


General debility 


2 


- 


2 


2 


- 




1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


9 


VIOLENT DEATHS. 




























Strangulated hernia . . . 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


1 


Accident 


1 


- 




- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


Accidental drowning . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Railroad 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Burn 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Hemorrhage 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Suicide 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


4 


Unknown 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


5 


Total. 


66 


36 


61 


46 


43 


29 


56 


63 


63 


48 


44 


46 


601 


Still-born 


3 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


- 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


25 



Population (estimated) . 
Death rate per thousand 



35,969 
16 



DISEASES DANGEROUS TO PUBLIC HEALTH. 

Of the diseases classed by this board as dangerous to public 
health, scarlet fever, di2:)htheria, and typhoid fever are the only 
ones that have visited our city during the year. 

Scarlet Fever. — This disease, which was specially preva- 
lent in the last three months of 1887, subsided in the winter of 
1887-8. 123 cases and 15 deaths were reported during the year 
1888, of which 88 cases and 13 deaths occurred in the first four 
months. 

In 1887 there were 202 cases and 31 deaths, of which 118 
cases and 27 deaths occurred in the last three months. Warning 



236 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



cards are placed on the houses, and the jDremises are fumigated 
after the termination of the disease. 

Diphtheria. — This disease has increased over the year 1887, 
but its prevalence has not been greater than in the average of 
previous years. 75 cases and 21 deaths were reported, as com- 
pared with 44 cases and 11 deaths in 1887, and 91 cases and 20 
deaths in 1886. 

We use warning cards and fumigation in dealing with this 
disease, the same as with Scarlet Fever, and we also have the 
sanitary condition of the premises investigated. The Inspector's 
table of the sanitary condition of premises visited by this disease, 
which has been jDublished in the reports of previous years, is 
omitted from this report. 

Typhoid Fever. — More deaths have occurred from Ty|3hoid 
Fever during the past year than in any other of the last ten years, 
there having been 63 cases and 17 deaths, of which 42 cases and 
10 deaths occurred in Sej^tember, October, and November. This 
result was probably due to the great rain-fall, the warmth, and 
the exposed condition of the ground. 

We examine the sanitary condition of premises where this 
disease occurs, but do not use a warning card or fumigate. 

SCARLET FEVER, DIPHTHERIA, AND TYPHOID FEVER REPORTED 

IN 1888. 





Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fever. 








m . 




^ 


« . 




!)-i 


2P . 


Months. 








T. OJ 

© 4^ 
tC -PA 

ci O 


. a: 

B3 


file 


!K -,-1 


o 

•^ -XL 

^ -4.3 


G eg 






^ ^ 


S^ 


p 


P w 


a>=fH 




'^ .'■^ 


OJ'M 






'^ 


^^ 




?; _ 


P.O 




!2; 


^o 


Janiiarv 


31 


5 


16 


5 


1 


20 


4 


3 


75 


February 


10 


3 


30 


10 


3 


30 


1 


- 


- 


March 


26 


4 


12 


5 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


April 


14 


1 


7 


9 


3 


33 


2 


- 


- 


May 


I 


1 


14 


2 


1 


50 


2 


- 


- 


June 


1 


1 


100 


6 


1 


17 


- 


- 


- 


July 


2 


- 


- 


5 


2 


40 


4 


2 


50 


August 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


September 


2 


- - 


- 


8 


1 


12 


19 


4 


21 


October .- 


7 


- 


- 


t 


4 


58 


14 


3 


21 


November 


14 


- 


- 


10 


4 


40 


9 


3 


33 


December 


8 


- 


- 


6 


1 


17 


2 


2 


100 


Total 


123 


15 


12 


75 


21 


28 


63 


17 


o- 




o 

Sewers shown thus: 



Ktliotpt Pmtm Co. Sosi 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



237 



DEATHS FROM SCARLET FEVER, DIPHTHERIA, AND TYPHOID 
FEVER IX THE LAST TEX YEARS. 







SCAELuEl 


Fea 


ER. 


1 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fever. 


Months. 




























■ 




1 




























Ti 


(-) 


^ 


(N 


CO 


-t" 


If:, 


^ 


t'. 


'/■, 


•c. 


3 


^_ 


ri >i 


-p 


o d 


r- 


Xl 


5i 





,_, 


<M 


eo 


't 


,/-, 





r- 


X 




r— 


m 


or 


<r> 


00 


00 


00 


«) 


00 




r- 


a. 


X 


X X 


Of) 


X 00 


00 


oo! 


t— 


no 


00 


00 


X 


X 


QQ 


an 


X 


or 




00 


CO 

1-1 


00 


00 

T-l 


00 

1-1 


00 


00 


00 

1—1 


cc 


_| 


X 


a, 


X 


i 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


XI 


X 


00 


X 


X 


X 


00 

1-1 


1-1 


00 


X 


X 


January . 


4 


2 






2 




2 




1 




6 


7 


7 


11 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 








1 


2 


1 


2 






3 


Febriiarv 


1 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


4 


- 


4 


5 


3 


- 


2 


2 


1 


31 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


March 


1 


3 


_ 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


4 


- 


- 


7 


7 


3 


3 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


2 


1 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


2 


- 


April . . 


2 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


- 


5 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


2 


8 


6 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 




- 


May . . 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


- 


- 


3 


5 


1 


2 


2 


4 


- 


1 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 




- 


June . . 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


3 


2 


3 


1 


2 


2 




1 


- 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 




- 


July . . 


2 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 


2 


2 


1 




^ 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 




2 


August . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


3 


- 


1 


- 


2 


- 




- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 




- 


Sept. . . 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


1 


1 


4 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


3 


2 


2 


3 


- 




4 


October . 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


6 


- 


5 


2 


6 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


3 


1 


- 


2 


2 


1 


3 


- 


1 


2 




3 


Nov. . . 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


- 


11 


- 


2 


1 


2 


7 


1 


4 


5 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


2 


3 


Dec. . . 


2 


-- 


- 


2 


- 


1 


1 


- 


10 


- 


4 


8 


3 


4 


5 


1 


4 


3 


2 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


" 


2 


Total . 


IG 


6 


1 


4 


6 


8 


14 


3 


31 


15 

1 


29 

i 


19 


44 


52 


31 


21 


28 


20 


11 


21, 


3 


7 


8 


^ 


13 


8 


11 


3 


" 


17 



DISTKICTS. 

The several tabulated statistics of mortality, dangerous diseases, 
and nuisances in the ten health districts into which the city was 
divided by the Board of Health of 1878, as shown by the ac- 
companying map, are continued in this report. The map also 
shows the location of sewers. The increase in population is 
assumed to have been the same, relatively, as the increase in the 
number of assessed polls, and to have been substantially uniform 
in the several districts. 



238 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 






I— ( 

ffl 
H 
< 



o 


o 




T— 1 

05 


CD 


'OOO'X .I9tl 


cit^t^t^cocDX'inoocD 


i 


JO -OK 


iC CO iC •* i^ !>j ,- O: CD Oi 
ooc<^'*coc^uc^;l-c:t- 

CO'^-^'^lC'^ld'COiO 


■ 




>^ 




1—1 
CO 

00 




•*" 


•QOO'l -lad 


CD00C<IO5COr^iO'#'^iC 

r-T-T-T-T-IT-^T-^KlrHT-l 


-^ 


JO -OK 


02THoocoo;oO'rH05C^?o 


■ 


1 




1-1 


05 


CD 


lO 


•OOO'I aad 


C^CCOT-ODCDinT-rfiTj* 




JO -o.si 


cDc^Oit-oot-uriocDoo 

T^T-HrHrHCNC<IC^C<lC<lC<l 


• 




1— 1 
l-H 


•< 

00 


CD 

T-l 


IM 




•QOO'l J9d 


05TtiC<)C0051O'*rH05Tti 


T-l 


•sq;B8a 
JO -otj; 


Tj<o;ooT-^t-Tf<coT-iocD 

rHTHrHrHrHT-HT^T-ieqT-l 


■ 








in 

CO 


t- 

s 


T— 1 

CD 


•000' I Jad 


03tNrJ<iCt-rHt-C0t-C0 

rHT-^T--T— It— ItHt-It-It-I 


'4< 


•SlU'88(I 
JO -OK 


C<1 iM 00 CO T-l 40 CO Tfi cq O 1 

(MCOCOTjfiCCOiO'^CDiO 










T-l 


CO 


T-l 
•<* 


'OOO'I Jatl 


•*00(Mt-COiO-*00»OCq 
T-H(MC0(MC0C<I(MC1C<1(M 


0< 


•sq:i^8a 

JO-OM 


•*OCD(MO!NrHt-t-fO 

T-HCOcocoT}<cococofOco 


, 




t^ 


< 

CO 
CO 


00 

i;o 


1 


CO 

CO 


•OOO'X -lad 


t-lOiM'*-^C<lTfi-*C000 


I* 


•sxi:;'B8a 
JO -ox 


t-O(M(NO0;00»0t-t- 1 
t-t-CDt-L-COt-OOOOrH 

T-l 




1— 1 


T-l 




00 


CO 


"OOO'I Jsd 


!NOO»Ob-t--<*iO»CO>-<S< 

Nt— IT— ItHt— It-IIMt— ItHtH 


t- 


•sxu^aa 
JO -ox 


(MIC0000OJ<I(MC5t-hc<) 

CDiOTj<iOCDiCt-iO00CD 


• 




1— 1 
i-H 
hH 




OS 




CO 


•OOO'X Jad 


OCCCO<MiOOOit-0>00 

T-ic<)ffqc<iiMcqT-H^T-iT-( 


. 


•sii^i^aa 
JO -OX 


05 Tt* T-l 0^ 05 (M O 00 IC ■* 1 
(MCOTjT-^TfTjTr^COrfirti 


1— 1 

I-H 


< 
o 

rH 


1 
CO 

CD 


CD 


t-^ 


•OOO'I J9<i 


O^CO-#iM!MOT-iOi05T-H 
T— irHT— It— It— li— IT-I t-I 


^ 


•sq!}'B8a 
JO •OK 


© CO ■* t- Ci IC CD tH Tf 00 I 

iniocDicicicxoioicco 


hH 


t- 

CO 

CO 


lO 

CD 


T— 1 

00 
05 


CD 


•OOO'I -19^ 


T-icoco-'i'cDt-ooooseo 


^ 


JO -OK 


C<)Tf<T-O5O000C<l»CI^00 

OJO-^r^CO^lCr^OOTfi 


• 


CD 

5 


1 


•rH 

o 

Ph 


CO 

be 


.5 C 






£JO=tH 

gig 














c« 
<1 




OCT-ilMCCTj<lCCOt-00 

t-oooooooooooooooooo 

XOOODODaOot-OCXOOOO 


•i 


iS2l ^1 





REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



•239 



TABLE SHOWIXG THE FIVE PEIXriPAL CArSES OF 'DEATH IX 
SOMEEYILLE IX 1888, WITH THE XUMBER AXD RATE IN- 
EACH DISTRICT. 





Co>-s 


CMP- 


Fnecmoxia. 


Hea rt 


Cholera 


Bright" s 




TIOX. 






Disease. 


I>FA>TUM. 


Disease. 


Districts. 




^ 




^ 


z. 


£, 


2. 




•r X 


O El 




s ?< 


^ ai 


S a 


«M OC 


























C c2 


. o 


c «2 


F«l-I 


O s3 




C c3 








5^j2 


^1 


^s 


^1 


>■ « 

^Q 


►So 


^C 




S-z z| 


























■'" 








I. . . 


13 


1.98 


12 


1.83 1 


1 11 1.68 


15 


2.29 


9 


1.37 


II. 




10 


1.56 


9 


1.41 j 


7 1.09 


i 2 


m 


7 


1.09 


III. 




6 


2.42 


4 


1.61 


2 .81 


3 


1.21 


2 


.81 


IV. 




12 


2.73 


7 


1.59 1 


4 .91 


2 


.45 


1 


.23 


V. 




24 


3.49 


11 


1.60 ' 


10 1.46 


3 


.44 


6 


.87 


VI. 




3 


1.98 


5 


3.29 


- 


6 


3.96 




- 


- VII. 




7 


1.89 


6 


1.59 


4 1.07 


2 


.53 


1 


.27 


VIII. 




2 


1.79 


3 


2.69 


2 


1.79 





- 


- 


- 


IX. 




2 


1.00 


5 


2.50 


1 


.50 


1 


.50 


2 i 1.00 


X. 




2 


2.27 


- 


- 


4 


4.54 


1 


1.14 


- 


- 


Total 




81 


2.28 


G2 


1.72 


45 1.25 


35 .94 1 


28 


.78 



TABLE OF SCARLET FEVER, DIPHTHERIA, AX'D TYPHOID FEVER 
IX' EACH DISTRICT IX' 188^. 





Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fev 


ER. 








_• 


^ _• 


1 




• 


.__ ^ 






_• 


._ _• 


Districts. 


ac S 


« 


*- X" 
S ^ 




K S 


X 


2 - 


P.5 ! 


i X S 


OQ 


S 2 


- c" 




m t-t 


-»^ 


a:'"S 


5'+; 


<s *^ 


-H> 


!C^ 


5— ' 


' X ~ 


? 


«'i 


X-.t- 




eg C 




II 


St 


5 a 
2 


1-^ 


3J ^ 


*3 " 

1 


' ^ §* 


(3 


X ^ 


It 


I 


23 


4 


3.51 


.61 


16 


7 


2.44 


1.07 


15 


3 


2.29 


.46 


II 


26 


3 


4.07 


.47 


6 


2 


.94 


.31 


5 


2 


.78 


.31 


in 


2 


1 


.81 


.40 


6 


1 


2.43 


.40 


6 


3 


2.43 


1.21 


IV 


6 


- 


1.36 


- 


12 


5 


2.72 


1.14 


8 


2 


1.71 


.45 


V 


14 


1 


2.01 


.15 


20 


1 


2.89 


.15 


11 


3 


1.59 


.45 


VI 


4 


- 


2.63 


- 


3 


1 


1.98 


.66 


2 


- 


1.32 


- 


vn 


21 


1 


5.59 


.27 


4 


2 


1.07 


.53 


4 


- 


1.07 


- 


vni 


8 


2 


7.17 


1.77 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


5 


1 


4.52 


.88 


IX 


15 


3 


7.51 


1.50 


6 


1 


3.00 


.50 


4 


2 


2.00 


1.00 


X 


4 


- 


4.54 


- 


! 2 


1 


2.27 


1.13 


3 


1 


3.40 


1.13 


Total . . . 


123 


15 


3.42 


.42 


75 


21 


2.09 


.59 


: 63 


17 


1.75 


.48 



240 



A]S^NUAL REPORTS, 



O !-i 


•.18A8^ pxOlldi^X 


CO-* 
<^5 o 


iHOO 
i-H rH 


CO rH 

o CO 

rH d 


OO 
COt); 

rH d 


t-rH 

O CO 

d d 


0> (M 

r-id 


CO t- 

OO r-; 

d d 


rH C 
C5 CO 

oi d 


rH 05 

r-; CO 

r-id 


05 QO 

rHlO 

050 


»-id 


"BLiaqi^qdid 


fOrH 


. 1-1 l^ 

00 CO 

i-5d 


C5 Oi 

cod 


CO OS 
CO CD 

N d 


»nC5 
icco 
■* d 


c^ in 

rH IC 

00 c<i 


CO<M 

C0 05 

cod 


m t- 

■* d 


ooo 

rHCO 

cod 


rHin 
rHCO 

xs^d 


r- X 

CD 00 

cod 


•J8A8J ^ai-IBOg 




COt-I 

<Nd 


rH CO 

icd 


Tpd 


Ci 05 
COrH 

cod 


ooin 

rH IC 

dd 


Oil* 

i6 d 


05 t- 

t-.o 

i-i d 


incq 
t-id 


S2 

cod 


^<6 




00 

CO 
00 


M8A8^ pToqdXx 


Ol CO 


00 T-( 

O-CO 

d d 


CO rH 

<^^ rH 


rH lO 
r-id 


OiC 

r-i d 


C<1 

rH 1 


o 1 


05 00 

in 00 

T)i d 


o o 
o o 

05 r-i 


COr- 


m cc 

r-id 


•TjijaiUTidTa: 




05 CO 

d d 


coo 
o<i d 


t-; rH 

Cq rH 


00 1-H 

c^ d 


00 CO 

C5 CD 
r-i d 


t- CO 

OO 

r^d 


1 1 


o o 
o m 

cod 


t- CO 
05 r- 
05 r-i 


m 

050 


M8A8 j[ !^8IJ«0S 


^H 1— ( 

CO d 


■*d 


rH O 

d d 


ll 


O rH 

c^ d 


CO 
^ 1 


lod 


T-H t-; 
t-^r-i 


in in 

t-ir-i 


•« 1 


05 05 

cod 




00 

OC' 
■M 

i 


M8Aa j[ pioxidAx 


t-.co 

(N d 


1-; rH 
rH d 


icco 
00 ■* 
d d 


O 00 
rnd 


COrH 
05 CO 

d d 


§ 1 


rH 00 


Oi 

CO 1 


rH 1 


1 1 


05 

05 CO 

rH d 


"BT.iaxii^ildTa: 


tP CO 

rt d 


CO 

d 1 


icco 
00 ■* 

d d 


CO O 
rHOq 
0<irH 


lO CO 
r-id 


§1 


IC 00 
00 c^ 

<6t6 


1 1 


ii 



51 


^^ 


M9A8J^ q.31.IL'0g 


ooo 
doQ 


°^ 1 


■* 1-1 

00 t-; 

COrH 


cod 


0(M 

qcq 
■* d 


coo 
cod 


inco 
■<ti in 

ood 


inci 

O 00 
t-ii-i 


o5eo 
00 in 

in d 



06 1 


in d 






00 

'X) 


•.i8Aa^ piotid^^X 


135 t- 

00 -H 

d d 


'^ 1 
d 1 


1 1 


t-co 


CO 

o 1 


1 1 


o o 

CO CO 

d d 


II 


o 


! 1 


2S_ 

dS 


•Buaii^tidia 


c4 d 


oi d 


CO CO 

d d 


t- CO 

<6d> 


00 IC) 
Tl^r-i 


a 

1-H ' 


Tti. d 


1 1 


C5in 
cod 


Oi 
CO 05 

dr-i 

tH 


t- CO 

00 CO 

05d 


•.i8A8^ ^aiaxjog 


^ 1 


1— 1 1 


lod 


00 CO 

coc<i 
n5d 


CO 
■* 1 

CO 1 


05 IC 

c4d 


CO 

in 1 


o 1 


CO 1 


in 

SI 


cod 




00 


M8A8 J pioqdAX 




OC5 
Kl rH 

rnd 


00 


cocq 

CO 00 

rnd 


rH 1-H 


■^ 1 

o 1 


O rfi 

«5 CD 

r-i d 


•* O 

drH 


!i 


05 1 


coco 

r-i d 


•^i.i8iHq;dTa; 


\6 0^ 


OrH 


looo 

r-id 


1*1 Oi 
CDO 

rH rH 


05 r-J 

cfl d 


a CO 

lOr-; 

dco 

rH 


rH 00 

in 05 

COrH 


Si 


o 

CO -. 

c-o i 


C5 

31 


t-CO 

cod 


•J8A8^ :;8I.ixjos 


t- 1- 

oco 

od 


CO o 

O rH 

cq d 


O b- 
t-;0 

00 d 


dd 


00 t- 

C5rH 

cod 


^ 1 

o 1 

rH 


CO CO 
t-i r-i 


§1 


rH 

05 1 

05 


in CO 
in CO 

dr-i 


inx* 
t^d 






1 


•.I8A8^ pioqdA'x 


1—1 o 


CDC5 

CO r^ 

th d 


^ 1 

rH ' 


d d 


o-* 

C^ CO 


1 1 


2| 

o 1 


rHCO 
r-; CD 

O? r-i 


00 05 
r-1 in 

r-i d 


:• 1 


000 

r-;05 

rH 


•BT.iaqjqdiQ 


coco 
in 7-? 


rH t~ 

rHCO 


CO 00 

Tj5 d 


rH(M 

c^'d 


fOiM 

cod 


^ CO 


cod 


2 1 


in 
in 1 

CO 1 


1 1 


■* 

CO 
C'od 


•J8A8J; :^8l.IB0S 


ICIO 

coic 

r-i d 


O 
"*' 1 


d d 


CD 
00 1 

00 1 


00 

'^ 1 


d th 

(M 


CO 

d 1 


t-i r-i 


^ 1 


d 1 

1-H 


l-H CD 

05 05 

06 d 




re 

00 
00 


M8A8^ piOridAX 


OOO 

CI o> 
Ti< d 


00 

^ 1 

O 1 


§1 


rH t- 

t-.ic 

rH d 


Tj< CO 

CO t- 

r-i d 


CO 00 
cod 


« 1 
d 1 


1 1 


22 

d d 


1 1 


00 in 
00 «* 

r-id 


•t'i.iaTi:^ildta: 


lO t- 
C<jlO 

cod 


(MOO 

eoo5 

"* d 


00 (M 

d rH 


lo d 


t-CO 
COtJJ 

t-ir-i 


rH»C 

coco 

dr-i 


■^ b- 

coco 

inrH 


1, 


05S 
005" 


^1 

05 1 


■* 00 
TfO 

inr^ 


-.laAa^ :^9IJi30S 


T^ 00 

Cic<o 
T-i d 


coo 

cod 


O 1 
CO 1 


o 
'^ 1 

d 1 


"^ 1 


<M CO 
05 00 

cod 


00 t- 

coco 
cod 


'^ 1 


^ 1 
05 ' 


1 1 


CO rH 

CIO? 
05d 




05 

00 
00 


-.laAa^pioild.tx 


en 
^. 1 


o o 

00 •* 

do 




t--CO 

rH. d 


>0 Ci 

OrH 


CO 

SI 


ii 


o t- 

inrH 
CO r-i 


1 I 


05 CO 

Tj«0 

t-i05 


00 c: 

CO 05 


•'Bi.i8r[;iidi(i 




Tf o 
O (N 

c4 d 


O CO 
OV rH 

t>^ CO 


cod 


■*oo 

00 (N 


(M ^0 
CO t- 

d t~i 

1-H 


O 00 

coo 
t-io5 


o t- 

in r-; 

d r-i 


rH in 
COCO 
.r-id 


in 
^ 1 


■* 
05 ac 

dr4 


•J8A9^ !^8IJXJ0S 


o 

O 1 


1 1 


o 

CO 1 


00 05 
l-iC 

r-id 


T-t d 


:^i 


21 


1 1 


1 1 


05 

-t 1 


05 in 

■*rH 








32 

oc CS 


a:i C5 
Oft 








ajifn 




a: 

ce a> 


a; 




•sioiaxsia 


1— ( 


l-H 


1— 1 

HH 
l-H 


l-H 


^ 


l-H 


l-H 
> 


1—3 

l-H 
rH 


d 


>< 





KEPOET OF BOAED OF HEALTH. 



241 



XUISA^'CES ABATED IX EACH DISTRICT IX 1888. 





District. 


I. 


1 n. 


III. 


IT. 


V. 


YI. 


YII. 


, VIII. 


IX. ; X. 


Total 


Population (estimated). 


6,555 6,39.5 

i 


2,479 


4,398 


6,874 1,519 


3,755 


1,116 


1,997 


881 


35,969 


Bedding used in typhoid 






















fever on premises . . 






1 
















1 


Cellar damp 


9 


4 




1 


2 




2 




1 




9 


Cesspool defective . . 


1 




1 






1 






2 




5 


" offensive . . . 


1 


_ 








1 










2 


" overflowing 




_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


2 




1 


3 




7 


Connections of drainage 
























pipes defective . . . 


4 


3 


_ 


1 


1 




3 


4 






16 


Cows kept in basement 
























of house 


_ 






1 


1 












2 


Drainage defective . . 


10 


10 


_ 


3 


7 


1 


6 


8 


1 


_ 


46 


" emptying in 
























cellar . . . 


3 


1 


2 


_ 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


_ 


19 


" emptying on 
























surface . . 


7 


1 


1 


1 


. 3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


19 


" not ventilated, 


4 


7 




1 


3 


1 


1 




2 




19 


Drain pipe defective . . 


2 




1 




1 












4 


Drying hair, offensive . 








1 












_ 


1 


Furnace without cold- 
























air box 










1 












1 


Hennery offensive . . . 










1 












1 


Hens kept in cellar . . 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 














2 


Hens kept in privy . . 


1 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 










1 


Manure exjjosed and 
























offensive 


9 


1 


_ 


1 


4 


1 


3 


1 


1 




21 


Offal on land .... 


4 




_ 




2 












6 


Offensive odor in and 
























al)out dwellings . . . 


_ 


3 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


_ 




_ 




5 


Opei^ng in drain-pipe 
























in cellar 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 








1 


Premises filthy .... 


4 


1 


_ 


_ 


11 


1 








~ 


17 


" untidy . . . 


7 


2 


1 


_ 




2 










12 


Privv-vault defective 


1 


2 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


2 




_ 




8 


full .... 


22 


7 


2 


7 


10 


5 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


55 


" offensive 


28 


13 


_ 


12 


17 


6 


4 


_ 


2 


_ 


82 


Slaughtering, offensive . 






_ 




1 












1 


Slops thrown on surface. 


_ 


1 


_ 


2 














3 


Stable and stable premi- 
























ses filthy and offensive 


2 


3 


_ 




3 




4 


1 






13 


Stagnant water in house 
























cellar 


1 


3 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 






6 


Stagnant water on sur- 
























face 


10 


_ 


1 


_ 


2 


_ 


3 




2 




18 


Waste-pipe defective 


_ 


1 


1 


1 




_ 




_ 




_ 


3 


not trapped. 


12 


13 


_ 


4 


_ 


2 


6 


2 






39 


Water-closet defective . 


3 


3 


1 




3 






1 






11 


" insufficiently 
























supplied with water . 


4 


5 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 




1 


_ 


12 


Water-closet not sup- 
























plied with water . . . 


2 


2 


_ 


_ 


" 1 


1 


_ 








5 


Water-closet offensive . 


3 


3 


_ 


_ 


2 


1 






3 




19 


Wooden waste-pipes and 






















drains 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


-1 2 


la i 


156 


89 


14 


37 


84 


31 


42 


21 


21 


2 ' 497 



242 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



APPROPEIATION FOR HEALTH DEPARTMENT A:N'D 
EXPE]N^DITURES THEREFROM, 1888. 

Appropriation ....... $4,500 00 

Receipts for permits to keep swine and goats and 

to collect grease ..... 226 00 





Total credit 


• 


• 


$4,726 00 


Expenditures : — 








For inspector's salary . 


-. 1 


962 


96 




' collecting ashes 


2 


,326 


68 




offal 




900 


00 




' burying dead animals 




67 


00 




' vaccine virus 




9 


00 




' fumigating (sulphur, pans 


, etc.,) 


18 


60 




' disinfectants 




9 


75 




' abating nuisances 




7 


50 




' care of ash dumps 




402 


66 




' investigating nuisances . 




37 


03 




' " cause of nuisance 




/ 




at Bridge Street sewer 


out- 








let . 


. 


10 


14 


( 


' analyzing water 


. 


10 


44 


i 


' property destroyed after 


Ty- 








phoid Fever case 


. 


25 


00 


i 


' distributing notices on collec- 








tion of ashes 


. 


17 


50 


i 


' books, stationery and printing 


190 


95 . 


( 


' serving notices 


. 


2 


00 


I 


' carriage hire 


. 


22 


00 


I 


' rent of post-office box . 


. 


5 


00 



Total debit 



Amount overdrawn . 



5,024 21 
$298 21 



THOMAS M. DLTRELL, M.D. 
J. F. WELLINGTON, 
CHAS. H. CRANE. 



INDEX 



TO THE REPOET OF THE BOAED OF HEALTH. 



Ashes .... 

Cows .... 

Dangerous diseases 

Death rate, 1888 (at end of 

Deaths . 

Diphtheria . 

Districts 

Expenses 

Goats . 

Grease 

House offal . 

Map 

Manure 

Membership . 

IS'ight-soil 

Xuisances 

Organization 

Pedlers 

Permits 

Population (at end 

Private streets 

Regulations 

Scarlet fever 

Sewers 

Swine . 

Typhoid fever 



mortality 



of mortality table) 



table 











PAGE 

231 
230 
235 
235 
234 
236 
237 
242 
230 
230 
233 
237a 
231 

22r 

233 
228 
227 
231 
229 
235 
229 
230 
235 
233 
230 
236 



TABLES. 

Mortality in Somerville, 1888 234 

" rates of, in distiicts, in last ten years 238 

Nuisances abated, 1888 . . 228 

" " in districts, 1888 . ■ 241 

Principal causes of death, in districts, 1888 239 

Scarlet fever, diphtheria, and typhoid fever, 1888 .... 236 

" " " " deaths in last 10 years . 237 

" " " " in districts, 1888 . . 239 

" " " " " " in last 7 years 240 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Iif BoAED OF Aldeemen, Jail. 23, 1889. 

Eef erred to the committee on printing, to be printed in tlie annual re- 
ports. Sent down for concmTence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In CoMMOisr CouJS'ciL, Jan. 23, 1889. 
Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERYILLE. 



To his Honor the Mayor and the City Council. 

Ge]s^tlemex, — I respectfully present my annual report as City 
Physician. I have made during the year, 1,409 visits ; of these 
298 were surgical, and 43 were made to persons at the police 
station. I have viewed the bodies, and have given certificates of 
the probable cause of death of 6 persons who died unattended by 
a physician. I have examined 21 persons supposed to be insane, 
and have given certificates in 14 cases. I have, under the Civil 
Service, examined 13 api^licants for the police force. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOS. M. DURELL, M.D., 

City Physician. 
Jan. 13, 1889. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldekmen, Jan. 23, 1889. 

Referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual re- 
ports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Jan. 23, 1889. 

Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Jarx. 1, 1889. 
To the City Council. 

The Trustees of the Somerville Public Library take pleasure, in 
submitting their report for the current year, to state that at no 
time in its history has this institution for general instruction been 
so extensively patronized, and, we believe, its usefulness so clearly 
demonstrated. 

The report of the Librarian is herewith transmitted, which con- 
tains all necessary information in res^ard to the dailv workino-s of 
the library, and its present condition. We would respectfully 
request that the same be published with the annual reports. 

The Trustees do not consider it necessary to make an extended 
report, as there is no institution in the city with which the public 
are more familiar than the Public Library. 

We have been guided in the performance of the duty intrusted 
to us, by the idea of making the library popular in its best sense ; 
dividing as judiciously as possible, the money available for new 
books, so that all classes of readers may be stimulated and im- 
proved by the best in every department of literature. 

The new catalogue has been printed the present year, and is a 
great convenience to the many who have occasion to consult it. 

In conclusion, we ask ^\dth confidence for such generous sup- 
port from the City Government, as we have uniformly received in 
the past. 

CHAS. S. LIXCOLX, 

GEO. A. BRUCE, 

SAIS^FORD HA:N^SC0M, 

WM. H. BPvINE, i 

J. HENPvY FLITNER, ^ Trustees. 

CHRISTOPHER E. RYMES, 

WM. E. WELD, 

JAMES. E. WHITAKER, 

CHAS. G. POPE, 



262 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Somerville Public Library. 

Gentlemen, — In submitting my sixteenth annual report of 
the condition of the library, I can only state, with more emphasis 
than ever before, the increased number of books asked for, of 
books read, and of books of reference used. It is pleasant to be 
able to state that nearly all of the books inquired for during 
the past year were immediately procured by the committee, who 
are always glad to know the wants of our readers. 

LIBRARY WORK. 

This has been a busy year. The catalogue has been com- 
pleted, and has been in use six months. 1,738 new books have 
been entered and put in circulation, a card catalogue is well 
under way, and the shelves are rapidly filling up. We now 
need the whole of our building for our own use, as there is no 
more room for the new reference books until some changes are 
made, and all public documents placed in the upper room. 145 
books have been worn out and discarded, and 10,951 covered 
and repaired. These were ^principally fiction, as we are trying 
the experiment of putting into circulation many new books with- 
out the paper covers, and find they are generally well used. 
The delivery of books from the counter is but one part of our 
numerous duties. The constant overlooking of every book when 
returned, the replacing of soiled and torn covers, renumbering 
and repairing of carelessly-handled books, occupy a large share 
of our time. This has been cheerfully and faithfully performed 
by the assistants, to whom much credit is due for the excellent 
condition of the books. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 253 

270 books have been bound, including periodicals. One new 
magazine, " The Historical and Genealogical Register," and 
one children's paper, "The Youth's Coinj)anion," have been 
added this year. 

One ancient and valuable book has been given by Rev. Charles 
Smith, and one by the author, E. S. Brooks. The " Somerville 
Citizen " has also been contributed, and we are thankful for con- 
tinued favors from " Somerville Journal " and " Somer^dlle Sen- 
tinel." 

ADDITIONS. 

Among the books added to our reference library are " History 
of Ancient Sculpture," " Palestine Illustrated," Turner's " Liber 
Fluviorum," " English and Greek Lexicon," " Graphic Record," 
Lacroix's " Eighteenth Century " in France, " England and 
Wales," illustrated, in four volumes, " Seats and Castles of Scot- 
land," and others. While in the circulating department an 
unusually large number of excellent books have been added; 
some of which are "Europe in Storm and Calm," "Ancient 
Rome in the Light of Recent Discovery," " American Litera- 
ture," in ten volumes, McCuUoch's " Men and Measures," " Face 
to Face with the Mexicans," Long's " Re2:>ublican Party," Sheri- 
dan's " Personal Memoirs," " Capitals of Spanish America," 
" Ancient Persia," " Three Cruises of the Coast-Survey Steamer 
Blake," " Donnelly's Cryptogram," with a large collection of 
juvenile books, and the most desirable works of fiction. 

CIRCULATIOX. 

The library has been open, for the delivery of books, 305 
days, and 81,844 books have been delivered. Of these, 80,697 
were for "home use," and 1,147 were used here for reference. 

The busiest week of the year ended with March 24, in which 
time 2,011 were delivered for home use. The largest number 
on any one day was 708 (March 24), and the smallest (July 31) 
w^as 100. 

This year three books were carelessly destroyed, and two 
others accidently spoiled, but all were paid for and re- 
placed. 



254 ANNTLAL REPORTS. 

Two thousand notices have been written and sent out for 
books overdue, and three were found to be missing from the 
shelves at the annual examination. 



* REGISTRATION. 

On the 1st of January, 1885, a new registration was com- 
menced ; since which time, 8,369 names have been entered and 
cards supplied. The number in use is constantly changing, some 
preferring to take out books only in summer, but by far the 
greater part taking books regularly through the winter months. 
This year 1,356 names were added. 

Our reading-room is generally well filled, and, with a few 
exceptions, quiet. We have allowed all to avail themselves of 
its privileges without regard to age ; but sometimes are obliged 
to exclude those who come merely for amusement or talk, and 
who take the places of people who wish for a quiet room for 
reading or study. Our reference books are used freely, and we 
lind it difficult to be able to state how many are used in the 
reference room of which no account can be kept. 

An immense amount of reading is now done by some of the 
youngest readers, — I mean by those under the age of sixteen. 
These we are always ready to attend to and assist. Cannot 
more of our teachers interest them in some particular direction, 
and, now that the taste for reading has been formed, give them 
subjects to look up, and encourage them to report to them such 
facts as they have mastered, for the only test whether a book 
has been read or not is the ability to tell what it contains ? It is 
true that the parents are the ones who should attend to all this ; 
but they are too often only pleased that the time should be so 
taken up, and find it too much trouble to investigate, or are not 
competent to decide. 

Many teachers now suggest books to their pujjils ; but I can- 
not but think that a great deal more might be done in this 
direction by teachers of the lower grades of the Grammar 
Schools. 

We have the best books of recent travel, and the newest 
thoughts of great thinkers, as well as the records of the past 
lives of the great and good of every land in our valuable library, 



REPOKT OF TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 255 

and it only remains for the reader to take, \\4thont money and 
without price, whatever will best satisfy his wants. 

Looking back at the small beginning of the Hbrary (less than 
three thousand books), and comparing it with its present num- 
ber (15,883), and the delivery of 81,844 in one year, it is plain 
to see the great success of its establishment. 

HARRIET A. ADAMS, Librarian. 

SoMERViLLE, Jan. 1, 1889. 



256 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF CITY TREASURER, 



Cr. 

Balance from 1887 

Appropriation 

Dog licenses 

Fines . . 

Catalogues . 

Expended in excess of appropriation 



$1,012 17 

3,000 00 

2,388 30 

283 57 

46 15 

12 94 













$6,743 13 


Dr. 




Salaries .... 


. $1,608 12 




Books .... 






. 3,055 06 




Printing and stationery 






234 60 




Binding 






108 53 




I^ewspapers 








, 12 00 




Gas 


- 






173 29 




Fuel . 








203 45 




Water 








29 00 




Repairs 








274 32 




Labor 








11 75 




Expressing . 








46 95 




Incidentals . ' 








37 31 




Catalogues . 








847 50 




Insurance . 








101 25 








16,743 13 





REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Boaed of Aldermen, Jan. 3, 1889. 

Ordered to be filed with the city clerk for presentation to the next city 
council, to be printed in the annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEOEGE I. YINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Jan. 3, 1889. 
Concurred in. 

CHAKLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Committee ox Highways, Dec. 31, 1888. 
To the City Council of Somerville. 

The following is respectfully submitted as the final re2)ort of 
this committee for the year ending Dec. 31, 1888 : — 

HIGHWAYS ACCOUXT. 

Credit. 

Appropriation $44,000 00 

Receipts and credits : — 

For labor and materials furnished 
prior to Jan. 1, 1888, the bills 
for which remained uncollected 
that day .... 8663 00 

rent of dwellings at City 

Farm . . .. S136 00 

less repairs and water 

rates . . . 10 77 

125 23 



pasturage at Waltham 

Gravel Land for years 

1887 and 1888 . . 8240 00 
less taxes on said land 117 30 



122 70 

unpaid bill for materials purchased 63 75 



974 68 

Value of materials on hand Jan. 1, 1888 . . 1,122 25 

Value of property on hand Jan. 1, 1888 . . 9,541 60 



Total credit 855,638 53 



260 ANI^UAL REPORTS. 



Debit. 
Expenditures : — 

For construction of Aldrich Street 8310 14 

construction of Berkeley Street, 

from School Street to Central 

Street 499 93 

construction of Boston Street . 750 28 

construction of Buckingham Street 274 22 

construction of Irving Street . 323 11 

construction of Morgan Street . 88 26 

street crossings . . . . 512 27 

street signs .... 98 32 

clearing and repairing streets after 

the laying of horse railroad 

tracks : 
Highland Avenue, from Cedar 

Street, easterly . . . $613 87 

Somerville Avenue and Elm 

Street 856 15 

1,470 02 



repairs and improvements of 
streets, and paving of gutters 
in connection with the setting 
of edgestones : 

Berkeley Street, School Street 

to Central Street, paving . . $390 29 

Bow Street, north side, from 
Bow Street Place to near 
Somerville Avenue, paving . 32 85 

Cedar and Summer Streets, in 
front of David Cummings 
& Co's estate, paving . . 37 61 

Dartmouth Street, east side, 
from Broadway to Evergreen 
Avenue, paving . . . 177 99 

repairs 332 28 



Amounts carried forward . . 1971 02 $4,326 55 



;971 02 


$4,326 55 


520 98 




283 83 




420 98 




687 77 




200 80 




55 81 




159 86 




175 90 





KEPOET OF COMMITTEE OX HIGHWAYS. 261 

A.mounts hroug^it forvmrd . 

Dartmoutli Street, both sides. 
Evergreen Avenue to Med- 
ford Street, paving . 
repairs 
Dane Street, north-west side, 
from Washington Street to 
Somerville Avenue, pa\TLng 
repairs 
Franklin Street, from Frank- 
lin Avenue to end of old 
sidewalk, paving 
repairs 
Grove Street, west side, from 
Elm Street to Highland 
Avenue, paving 
rej^airs 
Mystic Avenue in front of H. 

S.Atwood's estate, paving 24 13 

Prospect Hill Congregational 
Society, Bow and Walnut 
Streets, leaving . . 136 62 

Summer Street in front of 

Methodist Church, paving 26 86 

Walnut Street in front of G. 

W. Simpson's estate, paving 31 64 

3,696 20 

cost to City of sidewalks, the 

bricks and edgestones for 
which were furnished by 

the abutters ... 336 94 

ordinary repairs of streets : — 

Broadway from Franklin 

Street to Cross Street . 516 11 
Broadway from Dartmouth 

Street to Main Street . . 829 57 
Central Street from Albion 

Street to Forster Street. . 735 05 



Amounts carried forward . . $2,080 73 88,359 69 



262 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amou7its brought forward . . $2,080 73 $8,369 69 

Cedar Street from Highland 

Avenue to Lowell R. R. . 49 12 

Cherry Street from Elm Street 

to Chestnut Street . . 118 80 

Franklin Street from Perkins 

Street to Broadway . . 109 00 

Harvard Street from Summer 

Street to Beach Street . 590 63 

Holland Street from Cameron 

Avenue to Newbury Street 138 85 

Oak Street from Prospect 

Street to Bolton Street . 95 14 

Pearl Street from Crescent 

Street to Hillside Avenue 502 63 

Prosj)ect Street from Webster 

Avenue to Cambridge Line . 848 03 

School Street from Berkeley 
Street to Somerville Ave- 
nue 485 17 

Somerville Avenue from Pros- 
pect Street to Craigie 
Street .... 2,990 99 

Springfield Street from Cam- 
bridge Line to Concord 
Avenue .... 157 03 

Summer Street from Vinal 

Avenue to Linden Avenue 754 80 

Vinal Avenue from Highland 
Avenue to Pleasant Ave- 
nue . . . . . 191 36 

Walnut Street from Bonair 

Street to Pearl Street . 416 05 

Walnut Street from Boston 

Street to Bow Street. . 99 12 

Washington Street from Pros- 
pect Street to Boston Line 231 53 



Amounts carried forward . 19,858 98 $8,359 69 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE OX HIGHWAYS. 

Amounts IjrougM forvKvrd . 89,858 98 

Washington Street from Un- 
ion Square to Dane Street 961 79 
general repairs . . 10,5.47 77 



removing ledge of rock in sidewalk 
Elm Street at France sea Avenue 

repairing Broadway (horse R. R. 
tow])ath) Marshall Street to 
brow of hill .... 
less portion paid by railroad Co. 



90 07 
45 17 



rejDairs of stone paving 

repairs of brick sidewalks 

removing snow and ice and care of slippery 
sidewalks ...... 

cleaning streets . . . 

clearing and repairing streets after the con 
struction of sewers and catch-basins . 

constructing storage bins at crusher 

planting trees furnished by citizens 

one-half cost of maintaining Middlesex Av 
enue bridge for the year 1887 ; the othe; 
half being paid by the town of Medford 

su2:)erintendent's salary 

board of superintendent's horses . 

rent of superintendent's telephone 

tax on Wakefield gravel land 

tax on Winchester gravel land 

sidewalk assessment on Elm Street school lot 

cost of jury viewing Evergreen Avenue ex- 
tension, Thurston to Sycamore Street 

re-setting fountain. Union Square 

books, stationeiy, and printing . . . 

advertising notice of hearing laying out Al- 
ston Street (street not laid^out) 



263 

88,359 69 



21 368 54 
306 13 



44 90 
523 88 
660 79 

1,208 61 
2,815 40 

109 65 

1,576 29 

160 82 



5,690 14 

1,500 00 

505 72 

39 80 
26 94 
10 69 
41 81 

10 00 
37 28 
54 50 

11 80 



Amount carried forward 



845,063 38 



$45,063 


38 


4 


50 


51 


16 


439 


91 


1,328 


51 



264 AIS-KTUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward .... 
advertising proposals, edgestones,and paving 

stock . . . . . 

sundry small expenses ..... 
private work, etc., the bills for which remain 
nncollected . . . 
Value of materials on hand this day . . 

Value of property on haud this day : — 

horses (20) 14,450 00 

carts and implements used with 

horses ..... 1,956 50 
harnesses and horse clothing . 471 60 

stable utensils and property . 186 30 

tools, tool chests, etc., . . . 257 95 
stone crusher, engine and fittings 1,022 25 

8,344 60 

ISTet loss on city teams, tools, property and 

materials ....... 54 79 



Total debit . . . . . $55,286 85 



Balance unexpended .... $351 68 



Labor and materials have also been furnished, for which pay- 
ment has been made to the City Treasurer, or credit received as 
follows : — to 

Private parties, constructing driveways, side- 
walks, etc., . . . . . . 1382 69 

Boston & Lowell R. E. Co., repaiiing Wil- 
low Bridge aj)proaches . . . . 393 94 

Fire department account, paving-blocks for 

engine house driveway .... 333 90 

Miscellaneous account, crushed-stone screen- 
ings in City Hall horse-sheds . -. . 6 00 
Public grounds account, teaming at Broad- 
way Park 39 20 

Total $1,155 73 



KEPOET OF COMMITTEE OX HIGHWAYS. 



265 



We have also sold 
One old horse for 
Hay (rowen) from city farm for 

Total 



875 00 
30 00 



ai05 00 



and credited these aDfounts in the committee's books, to city 
teams account ; the bills having been paid by the purchasers to 
the City Treasurer. 

The profit and loss account on city teams, tools, property, and 
materials is as follows : — 



Dr. 



Tools, etc. (depreciation) 
Repairs of tools 
Holland- Street ledge 

Total . 



$229 89 

190 10 

1,064 32 



$1,484 31 



Ck. 



Gravel ...... 


. $307 53 


Edgestones and pacing stock . 


158 55 


Crushed stone .... 


188 94 


City teams ..... 


.^ 774 50 


Total . . . '. 


81,429 52 



Net excess of cost over charges (see page 264) $54 79 



The loss at the ledge was caused by the unusual exj^ense of 
removing snow in January and February, and the fact that the 
greater part of the stone obtained during the year was taken 
from the bottom of the ledge, where the work of quarrying, and 
also of remo\dng the stone, is necessarily the greatest. The 
price charged for the ledge stone delivered at the crusher was 
forty-five cents per single tip-cart load, and for ballast deliv- 
ered on the streets ten cents per load. The actual cost of the 
stone delivered at the crusher we find to have been about sixty- 
five cents. 5,221 loads of ledge stone were delivered at the 
crusher during the year, and about 400 loads of stone for the 
crusher and 1,000 loads of ballast remain on hand at the ledge. 



266 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Crushed stone has been charged to the various jobs of work 
where it has been used at seventy-five cents per load at the 
crusher, on the basis of forty-five cents per load for the stone 
delivered at the crusher to be broken. If the price for the stone 
to be broken or crushed had been sixty-live cents, which was the 
cost of the stone delivered from the le<^e, the cost of crushed 
stone ready for teaming to the several pieces of work w^ould 
have been about ninety-one cents. 7,784 loads were sent from 
the crusher, and about 400 loads remain on hand. 

All the gravel used has been brought from the Waltham land, 
by the Fitchburg Railroad Company, at a charge of sixty cents 
per yard for digging, transportation, and loading and unloading 
the cars. The only additional expense is for screenmg. The 
charge for the gravel at the dumj), to the several j)ieces of work, 
has been seventy cents per load for the greater portion, or 
7,725 loads, fifty cents for 168 loads, and one dollar for 494 
loads ; and for the ~ stones left after screening (1,695 loads), 
which have been sent to the crusher, forty-five cents per load 
delivered. The actual cost of the gravel screened appears to 
have been about sixty-seven cents. I^o account, however, is 
made for interest on the value of the gravel land, the assessed 
value of which, in 1888, was $8,500. The taxes are a little 
more than paid by the amount received annually for j^asturage. 

The balance of profit to the credit of edgestones and paving- 
stock account is the difference between the credits to the account 
this year for stock furnished in 1887, and the loss and deprecia- 
tion of this year. 

The charges to the city-teams account are for 
horses (the amount of $75 received for an old 
horse sold being credited to this account), de- 
preciation ........ 

Cart and implements used with horses, deprecia- 
tion ....... 

Repairs of same ..... 

Harnesses and horse clothing, depreciation 
Repairs of same ..... 

Stable utensils and property, depreciation 

Stable expenses and repairs . 

Grain and feed ..... 



1950 00 





439 


50 




425 


45 




179 


15 




255 


59 




15 


23 




1,246 


78 




1,310 


70 



EEPORT OF COMMITTEE OX HIGHT^^AYS. 267 

Hay and straw .......' 558 56 

Horse-shoeing . . . . . . . 508 69 

Horse-cloctoring and medicine .... 90 92 

Cutting hay at city farm (the crop being used in 
the city stables, except $30 worth sold and 

credited to this account) . . . . . 159 53 



Total $6,140 10 



The credits to city- teams account for earnings, at $1.40 per 
day for each horse, amounted to 86,914.60, showing a profit of 
$774.50, as before stated. The actual cost of maintenance, 
therefore, was equal to about $1.24 for each horse. 

A pair of old horses has been exchanged for a new pair, and 
one old horse has been sold, making the present number of 
horses in the department twenty. The total number m the last 
report of this committee should have been twenty-one instead 
of twenty, as the old horse which has since been sold was 
omitted in taking stock. 

SIDEWALKS ACCOUXT. 
Ck. 



Appropriation ..... 


$4,500 


00 


Credit : Advertising paid for in 1887 . 


11 


20 


Total credit 




$4,511 20 


Dr. 






Expenditures : — 






For Berkeley- Street sidewalks 


$819 


24 


Bow- Street sidewalk 


261 


09 


Dane- Street sidewalk 


761 


29 


Dartmouth- Street sidewalk, east 






side, Broadway to Evergreen 






Avenue .... 


450 


08 


Dartmouth - Street sidewalks. 






both sides. Evergreen Avenue 






to Medford Street 


1,019 


88 



Amount carried forioard . . $3,311 58 



268 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



1,311 58 

363 29 
931 44 



Amount hr ought for vmrd 
Franklin-Street sidewalk . 
Glen- Street sidewalks, Broadway 

to Webster Street 
Glen- Street sidewalks, Flint to 

Pearl Street . 
Grove- Street sidewalk 
Vinal-Avenue sidewalk 
Wallace- Street sidewalk . 

Total cost of sidewalks . 
Less assessments . 

Net cost to city 
Advertising notices of hearing for 
sidewalk in School Street . 
sidewalk in Otis Street 

Abatement of assessment 
Sidewalk order-blanks 



Total debit .... 
Balance unexpended 

NEW STREETS AND SIDEWALKS. 

Two private ways have been laid out and accepted as public 
streets during the year, viz : — 

Boston Street, from Washington Street to Walnut Street, 
and Buckingham Street, from Beacon Street to Dimick Street. 

The former, as laid out by the city, is forty-five feet wide from 
Washington Street to the easterly line of Prospect Hill Avenue, 
and forty feet from that point to Walnut Street, and the T\ddth 
of Buckingham Street is foi'ty feet. 

Boston Street has been graded and gravelled from Prosj^ect 
Hill AA^enue westerly to a j)oint near Mr. A. T. Kidder's easterly 
line, and the gutters have been paved and edgestones set at 
the four corners of Greenville Street. 

Buckingham Street has been graded and gravelled. 

Streets accepted in previous years have been constructed as 
follows : — 



504 99 
502 01 
992 02 

782 00 




^7,387 33 
3,693 69 




110 00 
9 40 


$3,693 64 
1Q 40 


• 


1 95 
4 25 


• 


$3,719 24 


• 


$791 96 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 269 

Aldrich Street, accei3ted in 1887, graded, ballasted, and 
gravelled, between Gilman and Pearl Streets. 

Berkeley Street, accepted in 1886, graded and gravelled, from 
School Street to Mr. R. P. Benton's line, the balance of the street 
having been constructed in 1887. 

Irving Street, accepted in 1886, graded, and partially mac- 
adamized, from Holland Street to the brow of the hill. 

Morgan Street, accepted in 1885, graded and gravelled. 

Eleven sidewalks have been constructed, one-half the cost of 
which was assessed upon the abutting estates, the city's part 
being charged to sidewalks account, and eight sections of side- 
walks have been constmcted at the expense of highways account 
and the cost of the bricks and edgestones used charged to the 
abutters. 

HOPtSE RAILPtOADS. 

No extensions of horse railroad tracks have been made during 
the year ; but the West End Street Railway Comj^any has taken 
up its old rails in Somerville Avenue and Elm Street, from 
Union Square to Cedar Street, and substituted the Providence 
Improved Girder rail. 

STORAGE BIXS AT CRUSHER. 

For the purpose of saving expense in handling the crushed 
stone, storage bins have been built at the crusher during the year, 
at a cost of $1,576.29. 

Heretofore the stone passing from the crusher had dropped 
from the chute upon the ground, and had to be shovelled into 
the carts, either to be carried to another part of the grounds to 
be piled up until wanted on the streets, or to be teamed directly 
to the streets. The height of the crusher above the ground 
made it easy to provide improved faclHties. The crushed stone 
now passes directly from the crusher into the bins by means of a 
belt, and the carts are loaded by simply drawing a slide and 
allowing the stone to run out. 

Instead of taking the time of four men and a horse some 
twelve minutes, the loading of a cart now consumes the time of 
but one man and a horse one minute. But little saving has been 
made to the department the past year in this way, as nearly all 



270 



ANNUAL REPORTS, 



the work at the crusher was done before the bins were finished. 
The capacity of the bins is about two hundred tons, or two days' 



crushing. 



STREET SIGNS. 



The discontinuance of gas lights, where electric lights had 
been established, caused the removal of the glass street signs 
which were in the lanterns. In place of these we have pur- 
chased metallic signs, with white enamel letters, arid attached 
them to the lantern frames. 

REPAIRS. 

The cost of miscellaneous repairs has been unusually large 
during the year, owing to the continuous rains and the open, 
mild winter. 

The streets have been badly washed, and they were terribly 
broken up in December, when we had a succession of verj^ warm 
days, during which the frost came out of the ground as it com- 
monly does in spring. 

Constant vigilance and work were required in this department 
to keep the streets safe, and in as good condition as was possible 
under the circumstances, and large quantities of fine stone from 
the crusher were spread on the unpaved sidewalks. 



SCHEDULES. 

Particulars of the work performed may be found in the fol- 
lowing schedules : 

STREETS ACCEPTED. 



Name. 


From 


To 


Length 
in Feet. 


Boston Street . . 
Buckingham Street 


Walnut Street . . 
Beacon Street . . 


Washington St. . 
Dimick Street . . 


1850 
300 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE OX HIGH-SVAYS. 



271 



STREETS IMPROVED. 



Street. 



From 



To 



Improvement. 



Aldrich . . 
Berkeley . . 

Boston . . . 

Broadway 
Broadway . . 
Buckingham . 
Cedar . . . 
Central . . . 
Cherry . . . 

Dane . . . 

Dartmouth . 
Dartmouth . 
Franklin . . 

Franklin . . 

Grove . . . 
Harvard . . 
Highland Ave, 
Holland . . 
Irving . . . 
Oak .... 
Pearl .... 

Prospect . . 

School . . . 

Somervillo Av. 

Springfield . 

Summer . . 
Vinal Ave. 
Wabiut . . . 

Walnut . . . 

Washington . 
Washington . 



Runey St. ... 

School St. . . . 

Prospect Hill Ave. 

Dartmouth St. 
Franklin St. 
Beacon St. . 
Highland Ave. 
Albion St. . 
Elm St. . . 

Washington St. 

BroadAvay . 
Evergreen Ave. 
Franklin Ave. 

Perkins St. . 

Highland Ave 
Summer St. 
Cedar St. . . 
Cameron Ave. 
Holland St. 
Prospect St. 
Crescent St. 

Webster Ave. 

Berkeley St. 

Prospect St. 

Cambridge line 

Vinal Ave. . 
Highland Ave. 
Boston St. . 

Bonair St. . 

Prospect St. 
Union Square 



Pearl St 

R. P. Benton's land 
Xear Kidder's ) 



es'lv line f 
Main St* . . 
Cross St. . . 
Dimick St. . 
Lowell R. R. 
Forster St. . 
Chestnut St. 

Somerville Ave 

Evergreen Ave. 
Medford St. 
Northeastwardly . 

! Broadway . 

Elm St. . . 
Beach St. . 
Eastwardlv . 
Newburj- fet. 
Brow of Hill 
Bolton St. . 
Hillside Ave. 

Cambridge line 

Somerville Ave. 

Craigie St. . . 

Concord Ave. . 

Linden Ave. 
Pleasant Ave. 
Bow St. . . . 

Pearl St. . . . 



Boston St. 
Dane St. . 



( Graded, ballasted, and ) 
I gravelled. f 

Graded and gravelled . 



Re-macadamized . . . 

Graded and gravelled . 

Graded and macadamized 

Gravelled 

Re-macadamized . . . 
I Graded, macadamized, 
I and gravelled 

Macadamized and grav'ld 

Graded and gravelled . . 

Macadamized and grav'ld 
I Re-macadamized and ) 
\ gravelled. ) 

Macadamized 

Gravelled 

Re-graded and macadam' d 

Re-macadamized . . . 

Macadamized 

Gravelled 

Macadamized and grav'ld 
( Re-macadamized and ) 
I aravelled j 

Gravellecl 

I Re-macadamized and ) 
( gravelled 

( Re-macadaraized 



and 



Gravelled 



rra veiled 



( Re-macadamized and ) 
I gravelled ) 
\ Re-macadamized and I 
( gravelled j 
Gravelled 



Ft. 



300 

1100 

800 

700 

1100 

280 

700 

1450 

j 280 

jl400 

700 

900 

' 220 

I 600 

I 400 
! 720 

450 
I 700 
I 900 

320 
1650 

1000 

jl380 

1 5400 

i 800 

4700 
I 400 
11100 

I 770 

I 850 
2250 



SIDEWALKS CONSTRUCTED WHERE THE ]MATERIALS AND LABOR WERE 
FURNISHED BY THE CITY, AND ONE HALF OF THE COST WAS AS- 
SESSED UPON THE ABUTTING ESTATES. 



Street. 


From 


To 


Feet 
of Edge- 
stones. 


Yards 

of 
Brick. 


Cost. 


Berkeley, both ) 
sides j 

Bow 

Dane 

Dartmouth, east ) 

side j 
Dartmouth.both ) 

sides j 

Franklin . . . 


School Street. . 

Bow St. Place . 
Washington St. 
Broadway . . . 

Evergreen Ave. 

Franklin Ave. . 


R. P. Benton's 1 

land j 

Near Somer- ) 

ville Ave. ) 

Somerville Ave. 

Evergreen Ave. 

Medford Street. 

End of old side- { 
walk. ( 


1,375.09 

148.90 

1,275.01 

657.11 

1,553.06 

222.09 


132.09 



172.31 


§819 24 

261 09 
761 29 
450 08 

1,019 88 

363 29 



272 



a:n^n^ual reports. 



SIDEWALKS CONSTRUCTED, ETC. — Concluded. 



Street. 


From 


To 


Feet 
of Edge- 
stones. 


Yards 

of 
Brick. 


Cost. 


Glen 

Glen 

Grove, westerly ) 

side j 

Vinal Av., north- \ 

westerly side ) 

"Wallace .... 


Flint Street . . 
Broadway . . . 

Elm Street. . . 

Highland Ave. . 
Broadway . . . 


Pearl Street . . 
"Webster Street. 

Highland Ave. . 

Summer Street. 
Holland Street. 


390.03 


432.28 
930.26 

258.67 

1,129.37 

886.18 


504 99 
931 44 

502 01 

992 02 
782 00 






Totals, 


5,621.29 


3,941.16 


S7,387 33 



SIDEWALKS CONSTRUCTED WHERE THE EDGESTONES AND BRICKS WERE 
FURNISHED BY THE ABUTTERS. 



For 


Street. 


Feet of 
Edg' stones 


Yards of 
Brick. 


H. S. Atwood 

David Cummings & Co. . . 

Charles Drouet 

First Methodist Episcopal Ch. 

Jere. McCarty 

D. L. McGregor 

Prosp. Hill Congregat'n'l Soc. 
G. W. Simpson 


Mystic Avenue . . 
Cedar and Summer. 

Summer 

Bow 

Walnut 

"Walnut and Bonair. 
Walnut and Bow . 
Walnut . . . . . 


50.4 

97.7 

99.2 

146.8 
90.3 


48.2 
28.2 
38.2 

20.7 
24.2 

24.8 


Totals 


484.4 


184.3 







DRIVEWAYS CONSTRUCTED (AT EXPENSE OF ABUTTERS). 



For 



Street. 



L. B. Angier 
r. W. Leavitt 
M. O. Rovce 
H. D. Runey 
W. F. Wade 



Broadway . . . 
Somerville Avenue 
Bonair .... 
Cross .... 
Cedar .... 



REPORT or COMMITTEE OX HIGHWAYS. 273 



DRIVEWAYS DISCONTINUED (AT EXPENSE OF ABUTTERS). 


For 


Street. 


Harrison Aldrich 

Augusta S. Vinal 


Franklin . 

Walnut 







CROSSINGS COXSTRUCTED. 

Central Street, in line with northerly sidewalk of Berkeley 

Street. 
Central Street, across end of Albion Street. 
Marshall Street, across end of Stickney Avenue. 
Medford Street, northerly side, across Dartmouth Street. 
Somerville Av^enue, at easterly side of Beacon Street bridge. 
Somerville Avenue in line with easterly sidewalk of Hawkins 

Street. 
Walnut Street, across end of Hillside Park. 
Warren Avenue, across end of Sanborn Avenue. 

CULVERTS CONSTRUCTED. 

Cameron Avenue, pipe, under street, near Cambridge line, 1. 
Highland Avenue, pij^e, under street, at Eastman Place, 1. 
Medford Street, wood, under sidewalk, at Lowell Railroad 

Bridge, 1. 
Medford Street, wood, under sidewalk, near Cambridge line, 1. 
Mystic Avenue, stone, under street, near Medford line, 1. 
Mystic Avenue, stone, under street, near Cbauncey Avenue, 1. 

DANGER SIGNS ERECTED. 

Broadway, at City Ledge. 
Chandler Street, at Broadway. 
Garfield Avenue, near Broadway. 
Richdale Avenue, at Sycamore Street. 

STREET SIGNS ERECTED (wooden). 
Broadway. • Porter Street. 

Garfield Avenue. Union Street. 

Irving Street. Wallace Street. 



274 



Alfi^UAL REPORTS. 



STREET SIGNS PROVIDED 

Beacon Street, 1. 
Belmont Street, 1. 
Boston Street, 1. 
Bow Street, 2. 
Broadway, 4. 
Buckingham Street, 1. 
Cedar Street, 1. 
Central Street, 3. 
Concord Avenue, 2. 
Cross Street, 1. 
Elm Street, 4. 
Fitchburg Street, 1. 
Franklin Street, 4, 
Frost Avenue, 1. 
Glen Street, 1. 
Grand View Avenue, 1.. 
Grove Street, 2. 
Holland Street, 1. 
Irving Street, 1. 
Linwood Street, 2. 
Main Street, 1. 



(metallic, on lantern frames), 

Marshall Street, 1. 
Medford Street, 3. 
Mt. Vernon Street, 1. 
Morrison Street, 1. 
Park Avenue, 1. 
Pearl Street, 5. 
Pearl Street Place, 1. 
Perkins Street, 1. 
Prospect Street, 1. 
School Street, 2. 
Somerville Avenue, 4. 
Summer Street, 2. 
Summit Avenue, 1. 
Temple Street, 1. 
Wallace Street, 1. 
Walnut Street, 3. 
Warren Avenue, 1. 
Webster Avenue, 2. 
Wesley Park, 1. 
Winslow Avenue, 1. 



EDGESTONES AND PAVING. 

Lineal feet of edgestones set (including 800 feet reset), 
6,905.33 ; square yards of brick paving laid (including 600 yards 
relaid), 4,725. 19 ; square yards of stone paving laid (including 
360 yards relaid), 2,949. 

' For the Committee, 



NATHAN H. REED, Chairman. 
GEO. I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SEWERS. 



CITY OF SOMHRVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermeist, Jan. 3, 1889. 

Ordered to be filed with the city clerk for presentation to the next city 
council, to be printed in the annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEOKGE I. YINCENT, Clerk. 



In Commox Council, Jan. 3, 1889. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Cterk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Ix Committee on Seweks, Dec. 31, 1888. 
To the Board of Aldermen of Somerville. 

The committee on sewers presents the following final report 
for the year 1888: — 

SEWERS ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 

Appropriation 19,500 00 

Receipts and credits : — 

For catch-basin curbs in sidewalks: — 
received credit from Sidewalks 

account 814 37 

fee for drainage of Asylum build- 
ings into Fitchburg Street sewer 50 00 
labor and materials furnished in 
1887, the bills for which re- 
mained uncollected Jan. 1, 1888 147 04 

211 41 



YaLie of materials on hand Jan. 1, 1888 238 67 

Value of tools and property Jan. 1, 1888 407 70 



Total credit .... $10,352 78 

Debit. 
Expenditures : — 

For seven sewers, as per accompany- 
ing table .... 19,906 10 
less assessments .... 8,744 67 

cost to city .... 1,161 43 



Amount carried forward . . . , $1,161 43 



278 



AJS'NUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought for loard . . . . 

For man-liole School Street at Landers Street 

twenty-two catch basins (average $82.25) 

five-ninths cost of removing deposit from 
month of Bridge Street sewer 

repairing sewers and drains . 

flushing sewers and filling catch-basins with 
water ...... 

cleaning sewers ..... 

examining sewers .... 

repairing catch-basins .... 

moving catch-basin, Marshall Street at Stick 
ney Avenue ..... 

changing lines and grades of catch-basins 

cleaning catch-basins .... 

cleaning mouths of catch-basins 

examining catch-basins 

repairing man -holes .... 

changing lines and grades of man-holes 

cleaning man-holes .... 

inspecting house drains 

inspecting sewers built by abutters in Ames, 
Bartlett, Bennett, Bradley, Carleton, Cook, 
Dana, Delaware, Grant, Jay, Hersey, Lan- 
ders, Mansfield, Robinson, Rossmon and 
Thorndike Streets, and Francesca, Jenny 
Lind, Kensington, Richdale, and Winthrop 
Avenues, and on^land of Timothy Tufts 

unpaid bills of 1887 

books, stationery, and printing 

repairing tools and property 

arranging tools and property 

sundry small expenses 

abatement of sewer assessment to Rebecca 
and Philip I^utting on common sewer in 
Elm Street 



$1,161 43 

40 00 
1,809 44 

1,741 28 
365 40 

370 55 

946 93 

45 07 

112 57 

54 84 

41 77 
2,058 13 

205 86 
5 63 
8 81 

147 72 
33 12 

271 25 



537 88 

7 50 

66 60 

42 35 

5 63 

33 80 



13 30 



Amount carried forward 



$10,126 86 



EEPOET OF co:m:mittee ox se^'ees. 279 

Amount hrought foricard .... -^10,126 86 

For advertismg hearings on proposed sewers in 
Madison and Montrose Streets and Kent 

Court 22 25 

labor and materials furnished, the bills for 
which are to be presented for collection in 

1889 

private work, the bills for which remain un- 
collected ....... 

Depreciation in value of tools, property and ma- 
terials ....... 

Value of materials on hand Dec. 31, 1888 . 

Value of tools and property on hand Dec. 31, 1888 
(including purchases during the year, 
8131.55) 394 14 



86 


59 


3 


60 


146 


99 


229 


54 



Total debit $11,009 97 



Amount overdrawn $657 19 

In addition to the above statement, labor and materials have 
been furnished, for which credit or payment has been received as 
follows : — 

To A. "W. Bryne, puddling sewer trenches, 

Highland Avenue and Cherry Street . $10 26 

J. G. ScuUey, ballast from Elm Street 
sewer, near Chapel Street, allowed in cost 
of said sewer ...... 22 20 



832 46 

The sewer in TTheatland Street being obstructed, about 
seventy feet of it was opened and cleaned, and the sewer was 
covered with plank for the winter. It was found to have been 
crushed out of shape, and a part of the top had fallen in. It 
should be relaidin the spring. 

The easterly side of the Waverly Street sewer plank outlet 
has been rebuilt. 

The following is a table of the sewers laid by the city during 
the year : 



280 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Boaed of Aldeemen, Feb. 28, 1889. 

Eeferred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual re- 
ports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VmCEKT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Feb. 28, 1889. 

Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSOJs^, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of City Exgineee, Somerville, Feb. 15, 1889. 
To Ms Honor the Mayor and the City Council. 

In compliance with City Ordinance 9, Section 9, the following 
report of the City Engineer is respectfully submitted : — 

CITY EXGIXEER'S DEPARTMEXT. 

The number of persons regularly employed in this department 
during the year 1888 was five. Additional help has been em- 
ployed as occasion required. 

The expenses of the department have been as follows : 

Salary of the City Engineer, including the care 

and maintenance of horse and carriage . . $2,200 00 

Salary of assistants ..... 1,832 53 

Instruments and supplies .... 346 72 

Car fares ....... 17 42 



Total $4,395 70 

SEWERS. 

Five thousand and thirty-five linear feet, or ninety-five one 
hundredths of a mile of pipe sewers, have been built by the City, 
and about eight thousand one hundred linear feet, or one and five- 
tenths miles have been built by private parties, during the past 
year. 

The cost of sewers built by the City was $9,906.10. Of this 
amount 18,744.67 has been assessed on abutters, and $1,161.43 
has been assumed by the City. 

The construction of private Sewers has been carried on under 
the superintendence of inspectors in the employ of the City. The 
cost of inspection was $502.88. 



284 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

The annual cliarge for dredging the Bridge-Street Outlet was 
made this j^^ear. The amount expended was $3,134.30 : of this 
amount five ninths, or $1,741.28, has been paid by the City of 
Somerville, the remaining four ninths by the City of Cambridge. 

The demands made on the sewer department during the coming 
year will probably be larger than for some years past. The follow- 
ing items are some that have been brought to my attention during 
the past year. 

THE WHEATLAISTD STREET SEWER. 

The Wheatland Street Sewer has its outlet on the north-east 
line of Mystic Avenue. It is a thirty-inch brick sewer, and was 
built in the year 1875, under a contract with S. H. Tarbell, at a 
cost of about $2 per linear foot. From the south-west line of 
Mystic Avenue to a point about four hundred feet south-westerly 
the sewer was built on filling. The average depth of the filling 
was two and one half feet below the bottom of the sewer. It is 
not known what was done to prevent settlement on that part of 
the sewer laid on filling ; but from excavation made it is evident 
that no support was given to the sides of the sewer at the spring 
of the arch, and the stone ballast with which the trench was filled 
was so heavy that the sides of the sewer were forced outAvard and 
the arch, relieved of its support by the sides, fell in. After heavy 
rains complaints were made that the cellars of houses in the Wheat- 
land-Street district were flooded. An examination of the Wheat- 
land-Street Sewer was immediately begun, and in that part of the 
sewer laid on filling, a dam was located about two hundred feet 
south-west of Mystic Avenue. Excavation was begun at this 
point and the arch of the sewer removed. On removing the dam 
it was found that the sides of the sewer had been forced out 
about twelve inches, and the arch correspondingly flattened. 
Further excavation indicated that in some places the arch had 
fallen in. About 75 feet of the arch has been removed, the trench 
has been thoroughly braced and covered over with planks at the 
grade of the street. Further excavations must be made before the 
length of sewer to be rebuilt can be definitely stated. The work 
of rebuilding should be commenced as soon as the 15th of April. 

The cost of opening and cleaning this section of the sewer to 
January 1st, 1889, was $147.43. 



REPOET OF THE CITY EXGIXEEE. 285 

The wooden box drain at the outlet of the Wheatland- Street 
sewer is broken and out of place, and will need extensive repairs 
in the s]3ring. 

WINTHROP AVEXUE SEWER. 

The Winthroj) Avenue sewer now ends at Mystic Avenue. 
From Mystic Avenue the sewage is continued in an open ditch, 
across private lands, and about in the direction of the extension 
of Winthrop Avenue, to 3Iiddlesex Avenue. Passing through a 
cuh'ert under Middlesex Avenue, it is continued in an open ditch 
to the Mystic River. 

The open ditch between Mystic Avenue and ^liddlesex Avenue 
is located on private lands over which the City has never 
acquired a right of way. As this ditch is one of the main out- 
lets of the sewerage system, it is highly proper that so important 
an outlet should be on land over which the City has complete 
control. The location of the open ditch should be abandoned, 
and the Winthrop Avenue sewer extended to Middlesex Avenue 
through a proposed extension of Winthrop Avenue. A taking 
of land could then be made which would be satisfactory to the 
owners of the property. 

The extension of Winthrop Avenue would be a great public 
improvement, because it would open a shorter route from Somer- 
ville to Maiden via Middlesex Avenue. 

An examination has recently been made of the culvert under 
Middlesex Avenue at the end of the open ditch. The lower end 
of the culvert was found to have been undermined, and the bot- 
tom of the culvert forced from its place, to such an extent that 
at high tide, water is forced through the bottom of the culvert, 
and the sewers in Winthrop Avenue and Wheatland Street are 
filled by the tide. The result of this is, that, in time of high tide, 
the sewers, being filled by tide-water, are overcharged by the 
addition of rain-water from the streets to such an extent that 
the contents of the sewers is forced through the house drains 
into the cellars. The condition of this culvert is such that it 
seems imperative that it should be rebuilt this season. 

The south-westerly or inlet end of this culvert under Middlesex 
Avenue is seven and one-half inches above the end of the Win- 
throp Avenue seicer at Mystic Avenue. This difference in eleva- 



286 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

tion is effective in retaining a certain depth of slack water in the 
open ditch, and causes an accumulation of deposit in the Win- 
thorp Ayenue sewer, which, at the present time, has accumulated 
to a depth of fifteen inches. This deposit must necessarily con- 
tinue to increase from year to year. If this culvert under Mid- 
dlesex Avenue, were rebuilt at a lower grade, the trouble above 
referred to would be avoided. 

The benefit which would result from an increased scour in the 
Winthrop Avenue sewer to be obtained by lowering this culvert 
is a strong argument in favor of rebuilding. _ 

From these facts already mentioned, viz. : That the open ditch 
is on private land ; that by the proposed extension of Winthrop 
Avenue, the City would obtain a right of way for the main 
northerly outlet of the sewerage system, and that by the proposed 
extension of the Winthrop- Avenue sewer an increased scour, and, 
consequently, an increased discharge, would be obtained in the 
sewer ; that the proposed extension of Winthrop Avenue would 
open a shorter route between Somerville and Maiden via Mid- 
dlesex Avenue ; that the culvert under Middlesex Avenue is 
unsafe ; that it should be lowered, as it is seven and one-half 
inches above the brick sewer in Winthrop Avenue, and causes a 
deposit to form in the said brick sewer ; that the tide flows back 
through the culvert under Middlesex Avenue into the connecting 
sewers, and into the house drains in time of heavy rain. From 
these facts it is evident that the culvert under Middlesex Avenue 
should be rebuilt, and the Winthroj) Avenue sewer extended to 
Middlesex Avenue. 

I would, therefore, recommend that the City proceed to take 
land for the extension of Winthrop Avenue, and that the Win- 
throp-Avenue sewer be extended to the northeasterly line of 
Middlesex Avenue, said sewer to be provided with suitable tide 
gates. 

EAST SOMERYILLE SEWERAGE. 

A great deal of complaint has been made by the inhabitants 
of that part of East Somerville drained by the Cross-Street 
sewer, between Pearl Street and Broadway, of the continual 
flooding of cellars in time of heavy rain. 

A thorough examination of the Cross- Street sewer should be 



EEPOP.T OF THE CITY ENGIIfEEE. 287 

made, having special reference to the grade of the present sewer, 
and also to the amount of deposit which may have accumulated. 

The Broadway sewer, from Cross Street to Winthrop Avenue, 
should be similarly examined, and man-holes built at connections 
with lateral sewers, and at changes in grade and alignment. By 
this means the sewer can be examined at any time, obstructions 
removed, and defects remedied. There are no man-holes on 
the Broadway sewer between Franklin Street and Winthrop 
Avenue. 

I would recommend that the Committee on Sewers be instructed 
to examine the sewerage system of East Somerville, and report 
what defects exist, and what improvements can be made in the 
present system of sewers. Also that man-holes be built on 
Cross Street and Broadway at such points as the City Engineer 
shall deem necessary. 

EXAMINATION OF SEWERS. 

An examination has been made of sewers that have man-holes 
built upon them. Deposits were found in the Wheatland-Street 
sewer and its laterals ; the Dane- Street sewer from Somerville 
Avenue to Washington Street ; the Kent-Street sewer ; the 
Washington- Street sewer from the Fitchburg Railroad to Haw- 
kins Street, and from Franklin to Waverley Street ; the Cross- 
Street sewer from Pearl Street to Broadway; the Winthrop- 
Avenue sewer; and the Holland- Street sewer from Irving Street 
to the railroad. In addition to the above, pipe sewers in West 
Somerville and in the Lowell and Yernon Street district, in 
Allen, Linden, Merriam, South, Ward, Bedford, Chestnut, Ham- 
let, Bradley, Central, Mount Pleasant, Lincoln, George, and Yine 
Streets, need attention, and are flushed during the year as occa- 
sion requires. 

CLEANING SEWERS. 

Sewers were cleaned in Bolton and Oak Streets ; Washington 
Street from the Fitchburg Railroad to Somerville Avenue ; 
Somerville Avenue from Union Square to Poplar Street ; and 
Marshall Street from Pearl Street five hundred and fifty feet 
northeasterly. The outlets at North Union Street, Winthrop 
Avenue, Wheatland Street, and Waverley Street were cleaned 



288 ANNUAL EEPOETS. 

several times during the year. In addition, the usual amount of 
flushing in pipe sewers was done. 

The cost of cleaning sewers for the year 1888 was $946.93. 
The cost of flushing pipe sewers was 1370.55. 

CATCH BASINS. 

Twenty-two catch basins have been built during the year at 
a cost of $1,809.44, and an average cost of $82.25. One catch 
basin has been removed and re-located at a cost of $54.84. 

The cost of cleaning catch basins was $2,058.13 ; an increase 
over the cost of doing the same work in 1888 of thirty-four per 
cent, due to the large amount of rainfall during the year. 

WHEATLAND STREET OUTLET. 

The outlet of the Wheatland-Street sewer is through an open 
ditch from Wheatland Street to Winthrop Avenue. At several 
places along the west side of the ditch, it has been sheeted with 
two inch spruce, to prevent the banks from slipping into the 
ditch. About five hundred and sixteen linear feet of ditch has 
been sheeted at a cost of $360.16. 

WAYERLEY STREET OUTLET. 

The wooden outlet which forms the continuation of the Wav- 
erley- Street sewer has been thoroughly repaired. A larger 
13ortion of one side and the top were removed and replaced with 
new stock. All old surfaces which were exposed by the repairs 
and all new material were thoroughly coated with coal tar. The 
cost of the repairs was $108.87. 

BRIDGE STREET OUTLET. 

The amount and cost of work done at the Bridge Street outlet 
is as follows : — 

Boynton Brothers, dredging, 4,520 cu. yards at I .60 $2,712 00 

Cambridge Water Works (flushing) . . . . 92 80 

Teaming .... . . . . . 2 50 

Labor 327 00 



Total . $3,134 30 

Of this amount five-ninths, $1,741.28, was paid by the city 
of Somerville. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY EXGIXEEE. 289 

PRIVATE DRAIXS. 

Four hundred and twenty-four permits have been issued during 
the past year for laving and repairing private drains. An ac- 
curate record has been kept of the new locations and the changes 
in old drains, 

IXSPECTIOX OF HOUSE DRAIXS. 

May 7, 1888, Alfred Pitts was appointed inspector of house 
drains and of drain layers' work. All drains laid since that date 
have been inspected and laid under his direction. 

PROPOSED SEAVER 

IX THE LOCATIOX OF THE BOSTON AND LOWELL EAILKOAD. 

I would respectfully call the attention of the City Council to 
the necessity of building a trunk sewer in the location of the 
Boston and Lowell railroad from Washington Street to some 
point west of Cedar Street, 

A sewer built in the railroad location would prowie for the 
drainasje of a certain section of the citv which it would not be 
practical to take into our present trunk sewers. It Avould relieve 
the trunk sewer in Elm and Beacon Streets of the drainage from 
a large area, and would be of great benefit to the sewer in 
Medford and Pearl Streets by relieving it of the drainage of 
Winter Hill from Marshall Street north-westerly. The area 
that could be drained by the proposed sewer is about four hun- 
dred and fifty acres. 

It would also provide means for disposing of surface water on 
the railroad location, and would be of great service to the road. 

I am certain that the railroad company would co-operate with 
the city in the building of such a sewer. 

I would respectfully recommend that the Committee on Sewers 
be requested to investigate this subject and report to the City 
Council. 

A XEW LOCATIOX FOR THE TOOL HOUSE. 

The sewer department has under its charge about forty-two 
miles of public sewers. The care and maintenance of these 
sewers requires the emploj-ment of a considerable number of men 



290 AJSTN^UAL REPORTS. 

and teams. Its yard for' the storage of materials and tools is 
far too small for the needs of the department, and larger quarters 
should be provided at an early date. 

I would respectfully recommend that a yard and buildings be 
provided and teams be purchased for the sole use of the depart- 
ment, and the City Engineer be instructed to do all the work 
needed to be done in connection with the laying of sewers and 
drains, and building catch basins, and the necessary repairs on 
the highways in connection with such work as the sewer dej^art- 
ment is required to perform. By this means the highway de- 
partment would be relieved of a considerable amount of work, 
and the sewer department made directly responsible for the care 
and maintenance of sewers and house drains, and for what 
repau's are needed on the highways in connection with the laying 
and repairing of sewers and drains. 

:^^ORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

The Massachusetts State Board of Health has submitted to 
the Legislature of 1889, a report recommending a system of in- 
tercepting sewers for the Mystic River valley and a portion of the 
Charles River valley. It is proposed to provide for the cities of 
Cambridge, Somerville, Maiden, Chelsea, Woburn, and East 
Boston, and the towns of Arlington, Medford, Winchester, 
Melrose, and Winthrop, by a system of intercepting sev ers, 
but for house drainage only and excluding surface water ; 
the sewage to be conveyed to Deer Island and discharged 
into the bay, the surface water to be allowed to flow into 
the streams. That the city of Somerville would receive an 
immediate benefit commensurate with the expense cannot be ad- 
mitted. The only apparent benefit to be derived is that there 
will always be a certain movement in the sewage at all stages 
of the tide ; whereas, now our sewers must act as reservoirs and 
store the sewage between tides. 

It can be said that at some future time when our city is more 
densely populated, and the pollution of the Mystic River be- 
comes more apparent, then this question of the disposal of 
sewage would become a public health measure, and such a 
system as is recommended would then become a necessity. 



EEPOET OF THE CITY EXGIXEEE. 291 

The apportionment of the cost of the system does not come 
within the power of the State Board of Health, and no statement 
has been made as to what this scheme would cost the City of Som- 
eridlle ; but it has been estimated that the cost would be about 
$500,000. Whether the City of Someryille ought to be obliged 
to make such an addition to its debt is a question. 

A table showing the location, size, cost per foot, assessment, 
and cost to the City of sewers built in 1888, may be found in 
Appendix A. 

HIGHWAYS. 

About ten thousand two hundred and eighty-two linear feet of 
edgestone and sidewalk have been laid, for which Hues and grades 
have been given. The cost of this work has been estimated, and 
returns, with the owners' names, have been made to the Board of 
Aldermen for assessment. 

Street lines have been furnished, and grrades oiven f or buildino-s 
and fences, when called for. 

STREETS ACCEPTED. 

Two streets have been accepted. Plans showing location and 
profile have been submitted by the abutters, and have been re- 
vised and deposited with the City Clerk. 

The street lines on these streets have been verified from the 
2:)lans, and permanent points fixed at deflections in the street lines 
and at street intersections. 

A table, showing location, width, and length of streets accepted 
in 1888, will be found in Appendix B. 

STREETS XUMBERED*. 

Four streets have been numbered. Surveys have been made, 
plans prej)ared, and notices issued to owners of buildmo-s on 
streets numbered. Many new houses have been located and 
numbers assigned them. 

SIDEWALK IMPEOVEJSIEXTS. 

In Appendix C. will be found a table, showing sidewalk im- 
provements completed in 1888. 



292 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

LOCATION AND LENGTH OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE STREETS. 

A table, showing the location and length of public and private 
streets, will be found in Ajjpendix C. 

SURVEY OF THE CITY. 

But little progress has been made on the City Survey, owing 
to the large amount of routine work required by the Sewer, 
Highway, and Public Grounds Departments. About fifty acres 
of the survey of East Somerville has been revised, the measure- 
ments of fences checked, and new houses located. About twenty- 
five acres have been surveyed in the Albion Street District. 

BRIDGES. 

Bridges on the Location of the Boston S Xouiell Hailroad. 

WASHINGTON STREET BRIDGE. 

This is a substantial plate girder bridge and crosses over Wash- 
ington Street. It is in good condition. The highway ap- 
proaches are practically in the same condition as in January, 1888. 
The head room remains the same, and the north-west sidewalk 
has not been graded. 

CROSS STREET BRIDGE. 

This bridge is in a dangerous condition. The floor timbers are 
not deep enough to give the floor its necessary stiffness. The 
temporary wooden blocking under the ends of the floor timbers, 
put there in 1887, at the time the bridge was raised, was not 
intended to be permanent, and should be replaced by masonry. 
The abutments are out of line and unsafe. 

WALNUT STREET BRIDGE. 

This bridge is in a fair condition. The floor timbers rest on 
wooden blocking, and should be made safe by substituting ma- 
sonry for this temporary blocking. 

MEDFORD STREET BRIDGE. 

This bridge is in good condition. 

SCHOOL STREET BRIDGE. 

This bridge is in fair condition. The sidewalk on the southerly 
side of the bridge is in need of repairs. 



EEPOET OF THE CITY EXGrS'EEE. 293 

STCAMOKE STREET BEIDGE. 

The floor beams are decayed and should be renewed. 

' CEXTEAL STEEET BEIDGE. 

The stone arch at this bridge is in fair condition. The 
repairs made on the sidewalks have put them in good condition. 

CEDAE STEEET BEIDGE. 

The old bridge and abutments have been torn down, and a 
substantial u'on bridge with block stone masonry abutments are 
now under construction. 

BEOADWAT BEIDGE. 

The floor timbers are not deep enough, and the floor, for this 
reason, lacks stiffness. This bridge should be rebuilt, if possi- 
ble, during the next season. 

Bridges over the Fitchhurg Railroad. 

PEOSPECT STEEET BEIDGE. 

The old bridge and the southerly abutment have been removed, 
and a new abutment is now under construction four feet south of 
the old location. The new biidge will be of the same style as 
the old one. 

The TTashinorton Street and the Beacon Street bridores are in 
good condition. 

Miscellaneous Bridges. 

BEOADWAT BEIDGE OTEE ALE WIPE BEOOK. 

The stone arch is in good condition. The retaining walls 
need pointing, and the joints need pinning in some places. 

BOSTOX AVEXUE BEIDGE OVEE IMTSTIC EIVEE. 

One-half of this bridge is supported by the City of Somerrille. 
The fence rails are decayed, and should be renewed. The bracing 
under the floor is somewhat decayed, but will not need to be 
renewed before another year. 

:Nril)l)LESEX ATEXUE BEIDGE OTEE :MTSTIC EITEE. 

One-lialf of tliis bridge is supported by the City of SomerTille. 
Tlio superstructure was rebuilt in 1887, and the bridge is in 
good condition. 



294 



AlNfNUAL REPORTS. 



PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

CENTRAL HILL PARK IMPROVEMENT. 

Work was commenced on the improvement of Central-Hill 
Park, April 23, 1888. The work done during the past season 
consists in laying 1,702.68 square yards of coal tar and asphalt 
concrete walks, with necessary grading and sodding for the 
borders. About three acres on the top of the hill have been 
covered with loam, dressed, ploughed, harrowed, and seeded, 
and are well grown to grass. The following is a statement of 
the cost of the work done during the year 1888 : — 

157.44 cords manure 
537 cubic yards loam . 
10,585 square feet sod 
1,702.68 square yards asphalt walks 
9.5 bushels grass seed . 
Labor ..... 

Tools 

Repairing tools .... 
Fencing, lumber, paint stock 

Building steps at Battery, and at Walnut and Med- 
ford Street entrances 

Total . , . . 

BROADWAY PARK. 

Early in the spring of 1888, a careful examination was made 
of the condition of Broadway Park. 

The walks in the vicinity of the pond were found to be at 
least twelve inches below the curbing around the pond. The. 
settlement of the walks prevented the surface water from flow- 
ing into the pond, and the grass has been flooded over large 
areas. In these low places, the frost has thrown the curbing 
out of line, and the grass has been winter killed. 

Estimates were made of the cost of filling the walks to the grade 
of the Curbing, and sodding where the grass had been destroyed. 

Proposals were submitted for furnishing and delivering the 
gravel for filling the walks. It was, however, decided that the 
amount appropriated for public grounds should be used for 



$440 


99 


489 


05 


264 


62 


1,872 


95 


38 


00 


1,592 


08 


35 


11 


14 


78 


27 


65 


it and Med- . 




. . . 139 


20 


. $4,914 43 



REPORT OF THE CITY E:N^GINEER. 



295 



the improvement of Central-Hill Park, and nothing was done on 
Broadway Park. 

I would recommend that the work on Broadway Park contem- 
plated in 1888, be commenced as early the coming year as prac- 
ticable, and that an appropriation be made for that purpose. 

CITY HALL AXD LIBRARY GROUXDS. 

Early in April, the City Hall and Library grounds were top 
dressed with loam, the bare places seeded, and the entire 
grounds rolled with a heavy roller. Fences were erected at the 
front corners of the library building to protect the grass, and a 
paved gutter was laid on one side of the driveway. 

The cost of the work done was as follows : — 
Labor, top dressing with loam, seeding^ and rolling 
Grass seed ..... 

Labor, care of lawn for the season . 
Paving gutter, 71.1 square yards at 12.60 
Repairing tools .... 

Labor, top dressing with manure 
Manure ...... 

Labor and materials, fence at library 

Total . . . . 

HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDS. 

The lawn in front and on the north-west side of the High- School 
building was top dressed with manure at the following cost : — 
Labor and dressing . . . . . . . $54 25 

Care of lawn for the season . . . . . 20 00 



id rolling . 


$40 01 




16 00 




18 38 




184 86 




1 23 




20 99 




82 40 




23 52 




$387.39 



Total cost of care of grounds 



174 25 



WATER^WOPvKS. 

Lines and grades for laying water pipes have been given when 
called for by the Superintendent. All pipes, gates, and hydrants 
laid during the year have been accurately located and recorded. 
The plans showing the distribution have been revised and cor- 
rected to Jan. 1, 1889. 

HORACE L. EATO^, 

City Engineer 



2 96 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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APPEIfDKES TO CITY TI^GII^EER S EEPOET. 



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a:n^nual reports. 



APPENDIX B. 



Streets accepted iisr 1888. 



NAME OF 
STREET. 


FROM 


TO 


WIDTH 
IN FEET. 


LENGEH 
IN FEET. 


Boston . 
Buckingham 


Washington Street 
Beacon Street 


"Walnut Street 
Dimick Street 


40 
40 


1,880 
290 



APPENDICES TO CITY EXGIXEEE S EEPOKT. 



299 



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300 



AI^'NUAL REPORTS. 



APPENDIX D. 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION, LENGTH, AND WIDTH OF PUBLIC AND 

PRIVATE STREETS. 



• 










Lexoth. 








Public 


Width 






Street. 


From 


To 


or 
Private. 


• 






in 
Feet. 
















Public. 


Private. 


Adams . . 


Broadway 


Medford St. . . . 


Public 


40 


900 




Adrian . . 


Marion St. 


Joseph St. . . . 


Private 


40 


- 


530 


Albion . . 


Central St. 


Cedar St 


Private 


about 35 


- 


2,740 


Albion . . 


Broadwav 


Medford Line . . 


Private 


50 


- 


100 


Aldersey . 


Walnut St. 


Vinal Ave. . . . 


Public 


40 


508 


- 


Aldrich . . 


Pearl St. . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Public 


40 


611 


- 


Alfred . . 


Broadway 


Medford Line . . 


Private 


50 


- 


50 


Allen . . . 


Somerville A-s 


?^e. Charlestown St. . 


Private 


25 


- 


680 


Allen Ct. . 


Park St. , 


Northwesterly . . 


Private 


20 


_ 


150 


Alpine . , 


Cedar St. . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private 


30 


- 


670 


Alston . . 


Cross St. . 


Shawmut PI. . . 


Private 


40 


- 


420 


Ames . . . 


Bartlett St. 


Robinson St. . . 


Private 


40 


- 


515 


Appleton , 


Lowell St.. 


Lawrence St. . . 


Private 


35 


- 


480 


Appleton . 


Willow Ave. 


Morrison St. . . 


Public 


40 


750 


- 


Appleton . 


Appleton St. 


Liberty Ave. . . 


Private 


40 


- 


120 


Arlington . 


Franklin St. 


Lincoln St. . . . 


Public 


40 


440 


- 


Arnold* . . 


Morrison St. 


Broadwav . . . 


Private 


40 


- 


1,690 


Asliland 


Summer St. 


Chestnut St. . . 


Private 


30 


- 


470 


Asylum Ave. 


Washington 5 


5t. McLean Asvlum . 


Private 


about 30 


- 


2,000 


Auburn Ave. 


Cross St. . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private 


30 


- 


500 


Austin . . 


Broadway 


Mystic A v^e. . . 


Public 


40 


680 


- 


Autumn 


Broadway 


Bonair St. ... 


Private 


20 


- 


420 


Avon . . . 


School St. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private 


40 


- 


700 


Avon PI. . 


Cross St. . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private 


25 


- 


150 


Barnett . . 


North St. . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private 


40 


_ 


670 


Bartlett . . 


Vernon St. 


Medford St. . . . 


Private 


40 


- 


820 


Bartlett . . 


Washington 5 


5t. Asylum grounds . 


Private 


20 


- 


200 


Beach Ave. 


Webster Ave 


Columbia St. . . 


Private 


about 20 


- 


200 


Beacon . . 


CambridgeLi 


ne Somerville Ave. . 


Public 


66 


6,100 


- 


Bean's Ct. . 


Cutter St. 


Southeasterly . . 


Private 


16 


- 


100 


Bedford , 


South St. . 


Cambridge Line . 


Private 


30 


- 


160 


Beech . . 


Somerville A\ 


re. Spring St. . . . 


Public 


40 


800 


- 


Belmont 


Somerville A"\ 


^e. Summer St. . . . 


Public 


40 


1,230 


- 


Belmont 


Summer St. 


Highland Ave. . . 


Private 


40 


- 


960 


Belmont PI. 


Belmont St. 


Southeasterly . . 


Private 


25 


- 


175 


Benedict . 


Union St. . 


Austin St. . . ► 


Public 


40 


600 


- 


Benedict Ave. 


Broadway 


Benedict St. . . 


Private 


20 


- 


200 


Bennett . . 


Prospect^St. 


Bennett Ct. . . . 


Private 


25&40 


- 


400 


Bennett Ct. 


Bennett St. 


Prospect St. . . 


Private 


10 


- 


100 


Benton Ave. 


Summer St. 


Highland Ave. 


Private 


40 


- 


925 


Berkeley 


School St. 


Central St. . . . 


Public 


40 


1,340 


- 


Bi,2:elow . . 


Boston St. 


Munroe St. . . . 


Private 


40 


- 


203 


Biilingham* 


Broadwav 


Williams St. . . 


Private 


40 


- 


568 


Bishop's PI. 


Glen St. " . 


Easterly .... 


Private 


10 


- 


75 


Blakeley Ave. 


Winthrop Av 


e. Cross St 


Private 


40 


- 


630 


Bleachery Ct. 


SoniervilleA's 


re. Fitchburg R. R. . 


Private 


30 


- 


450 


Bolton . . 


Oak St. . 


Houghton St. . . 


Private 


40 


- 


500 


Bonair . . 


Cross St. . 


Walnut St. . . . 


Public 


40 


1,470 


- 


Bond . . . 


Broadway 


Jaques St. . . . 


Public 


40 


640 


- 


Bonner Ave. 


Washington 5 


?t. Cokimbus Ave. . 


Public 


40 


450 


- 


Boston . . 


Washington i 


5t. Walnut St. . . . 


Public 


40 


1,880 


- 


Boston Ave, 


Medford Lin 


e Medford Line . . 


Public 


60 


910 


- 


Bow . . . 


Union Sq. 


Somerville Ave. . 


Public 


50 & 60 


1,100 


- 


Bow St. PI. 


Bow St. . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private 


40 


— 


300 



* Proposed. 





APPENDICES TO CITY EXG 


[NEEE S PEPOET. 


yoi 




: 




PUBLIC 


WIDTH 


LENGTH. 


STEEET. 


FROM 


TO 


OR 


T"V 
I> 








PRIVATE. 


FEET. ! 


PFBLIC. 


PEIVATZ. 


Bradford Ave . 


1 
1 

School Street . 


Southeasterly . 


1 

Private 


40 


; 


150 


Bradley . . . 


' Pearl Street . 


Northeasterly .' 


Private 


40 


_ 


800 


Brastow Ave . 


Lowell Street 


Porter Street . 


Private 


40 


_ 


660 


Brick -yard La] 


ae Prospect Street 


Webster Avenue 


Public 


25 


470 




Broadivay . . 


Charleston Line 


Arlington Line . 


Public 


60 & 200 


17,000 1 


_ 


Broadway Plac 


e Broadway . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


22 


_ 


250 


Brook . . . . 


i Glen Street . 


Cross Street . . 


Public 


40 


500 ; 


_ 


Brooks . . . 


Main Street . 


Northeasterly . 


Private 


40 


_ 


400 


Buckingham . 


Beacon Street 


Dimick Street . 


1 PubUc 


40 


300 


- 


Calvin . . . 


"Washingrton St. 


Beacon Street . 


Private 


40 




750 


Caml)ria . . . 


Central Street 


Northwesterly . 


Private 


40 


_ 


300 


Cameron Ave 


Holland Street 


Cambridge Line 


Private 


60 


_ 


1,000 


Carlton . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Lake Street . . 


Private 


40 


_ 


300 


Cedar . . . 


Elm Street . 


Broadway . . . 


Public 


40 


4,150 




*Cedar Avenue 


! Cedar Street . 


Linden Avenue 


Private 


22 




290 


Cedar Street P 


1. Murdock Street 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


20 


_ 


220 


Central . . 


1 Somerville Ave. 


Broadwav * . 


Public 


33,40,45 


4,700 


. 


Centre . . 


Albion Street 


B. & L. K.K . . 


Private 


35 


_ 


200 


Chandler . 


Park Aveniie . 


Broadway . . . 


Private 


40 


_ 


1,200 


Chapel . . 


Elm Street 


Chandler Street 


Public 


40 


273 




Chapel Court 


j Sycamore Street 


Northwesterly . 


Private 


12 


_ 


130 


Charles . . 


Washington St. 


Asylum grounds 


> Private 


30 


_ 


200 


Charlestown 


Malloy Court . 


Allen Street . . 


Private 


15 


_ 


400 


Chauucey Ave 


Broadway . • 


Mystic Avenue . 


Public 


50 


1,3L0 




Cherry \ . 


Elm Street 


Highland Avem 


le Public 


45 


1,450 


_ 


Chester . . 


Elm Street 


Cambridge Line 


Public 


40 


850 


_ 


Chester Avenu 


le Medford Street 


Angle . . . . 


Public 


abo'c22 


220 


^ 


Chester Avenn 


e i Angle . . . 


Cross Street . . 


Private 


20 




445 


Chester Place 


Chester Street 


Northwesterly 


Private 


40 


. 


200 


Chestnut . 


Cedar Street . 


Cherrv- Street . 


Private 


35 


_ 


400 


Chestnut 


Poplar Street . 


Southeasterly 


Private 


40 


_ 


540 


Chestnut Cour 


t • Harvard Street 


Easterly & west 


Iv Private 


35 


_ 


400 


Church . . 


Summer Street 


1 SomerA'ille Ave 


Public 


40 


600 




Church . . 


Somerville Ave. 


Lake Street . 


Private 


40 




300 


Church St. Pla 


ce Church Street 


Northwesterly 


Private 


25 


_ 


170 


Ciarenion . 


Holland Street 


Cambridge Line 


Private 


40 


_ 


^W 


Clarendon Av( 


i. Broadway . . 


Cambridge Line 


Private 


40 


_ 


300 


Clark . . . 


Newton Street 


Northwesterlv 


Private 


35 


_ 


450 


Clifton . . 


Morrison Street 


Arlington B.R. 


R. Private 


40 


. 


220 


Clyde . . . 


Cedar Street . 


Murdock Street 


Private 


30 


_ 


600 


College Avenu 


e Broadwav . , 


Medford Line 


Public 


: 50 


1,700 




Columbia . 


Glass House Ct. 


Cambridge Line 


; Private 


40 




550 


Columbia Cou 


rt Columbia Street 


Webster Avenu 


e Private 


9 


_ 


150 


Columbus Ave 


Land of Clark 


Walnut Street 


. Public 


40 


1,000 




Concord Aven 


ue Prospect Street 


Leon Street . 


. Public 


40 


1,500 


_ 


Concord Aven 


ue Leon Street . 


Beacon Street 


Private 


30&40 




470 


Congress Plac 


e Linwood Street 


Southwesterly 


Private 


16 


_ 


200 


C onion Court 


. i Columbia Street 


Easterly . * 


Private 


20 


_ 


200 


Conwell . . 


Highland Ave. 


Near Porter . 


Private 


35 


_ 


364 


Con well Avem 


lie Curtis Street . 


Westerly . . 


Private 


40 


_ 


600 


Cook , . . 


Wyatt Street . 


Marion Street 


Private 


40 


_ 


275 


Cooney . . 


Beacon Street 


Line Street . 


Private 


26 


_ 


220 


Cottage Avem 


le Russell Street 


Chester Street 


. PubUc 


40 


500 


_ 


Cottage Place 


AVashington St. 


Northwesterly 


Private 


abo't 11 




150 


Craigie . . 


Somer^Tlle Ave. 


Sunmier Street 


Public 


' 50 


i 1,250 




Crescent . . 


Washington St. 


Pearl Street . 


Private 


30to;38 




650 


Crocker . . 


Highland Ave. 


Crown Street 


Private 


40 


^ 


530 


Cross . . . 


. i Mystic Avenue 


Medford Street 


PubUc 


45 


3,750 




Crown . . 


Porter Street . 


Lowell Street 


Private 


30 




700 


Curtis . . . 


Broadway . . 


Medford Line 


Public 


40 


2.300 




Cutter . . 


Broadway . . 


Webster Street 


Public 


40 


740 


_ 


Cutter Avenu 


3 ' Summer Street 


Highland Avem 


lie Private 


40 




450 


Cypress . . 


31orrison Streel 
1 


" Grange Street 


Private 


40 

i 


1 


950 



* Name changed from Cedar Street Place. 



302 



AJ^NUAL KEPOETS. 









PUBLIC 


WIDTH 


LENGTH. 


ST'RTTTT.T 


FROM 


TO 


OR 


IN 
FEET. 






fj X XVXLiXl'X • 




PRIVATE. 


PUBLIC. 


PRIVATE. 


Dale .... 


Morrison Street 


Orange Street . 


Private 


40 




1,275 


Dana .... 


Bonair Street . 


Everett Avenue. 


Public 


40 


415 


_ 


Dana .... 


Everett Ave. 


Pearl Street . . 


Private 


40 




280 


Dane .... 


Somerville Ave. 


Washington St. 


Public 


40 


1,270 


- 


Dane Court . . 


Dane Street . 


Easterly . , . 


Private 


30 


- 


600 


Dartmouth . . 


Medford Street 


Broadway . . . 


Public 


40 


1,450 


_ 


Day 


Elm Street . 


Cambridge Line 


Public 


40 


940 


_ 


Delaware . . 


Aldrich Street 


Pearl Street . . 


Private 


40 


_ 


450 


Derby .... 


Temple Street 


Wheatland Street 


Private 


40 


_ 


1,032 


Dexter . . . 


Broadway . . 


Medford Line . 


Private 


50 




25 


Dickinson . . 


Springfield St. 


Beacon Street . 


Private 


40 


_ 


650 


Dimick . . . 


Concord Ave. 


Calvin Street . 


Private 


40 


_ 


860 


Distillliouse . 


South Street . 


Cambridge Line 


Private 


35 


_ 


150 


Dix Place . . 


Linwood Street 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


10 


_ 


100 


Dover .... 


Elm Street . 


Cambridge Line 


Public 


40 


940 


, 


Durham . . . 


Beacon Street 


Hanson Street . 


Private 


40 


- 


450 


Earle .... 


South Street . 


Fitchburg K..R. 


Private 


30 


. 


500 


Earle .... 


Broadway . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


30 


_ 


300 


Eastman Place 


Highland Ave. 


Southwesterly , 


Private 


40 


_ 


300 


Eliot .... 


Vine Street . 


Park Street . . 


Public 


40 


260 




Ellsworth . . 


Cross Street . 


Bush Street . • 


Public 


40 


210 


_ 


Elm .... 


Somerville Ave. 


Medford Line . 


Public 


60+ 


7,700 


_ 


Elm Court . . 


Villa Avenue . 


Northwesterly . 


Private 


18 




70 


Elm Place . . 


Harvard Street 


Easterly & west'ly 


Private 


30 


_ 


400 


Elmwood . . 


Holland Street 


Cambridge Line 


Private 


40 


_ 


970 


Emerson . . . 


Everett Street 


Newton Street . 


Private 


30 


_ 


170 


Emery . . . 


Fitchburg K.E,. 


South Street . . 


Private 


30 


_ 


530 


Endicott Avenue 


Broadway . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


40 


_ 


800 


Essex .... 


Medford Street 


Richdale Avenue 


Private 


40 


_ 


200 


Everett . . . 


Webster Ave. 


Newton Street . 


Private 


30 


_ 


350 


Everett Avenue 


Cross Street . 


Dana Street . . 


Public 


40 


800 


_ 


Evergreen Ave. 


Marshall Street 


Sycamore Street 


Public 


40 


1,320 


_ 


Evergreen Sq. 


Porter Street . 


Southeasterly . 


Private 


8 




200 


Fairlee . . . 


Cherry Street 


Northwesterly . 


Private 


30 


_ 


150 


Fairmount Ave. 


Curtis Street . 


Northwesterly . 


Private 


40 


_ 


700 


Fanning Avenue 


Willow Avenue 


Lexington Ave. 


Private 


50 


_ 


1,150 


Farragut Ave . 


Broadway . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


40 


- 


840 


Fisk Avenue . 


Hinckley Street 


Lowell Street . 


Private 


20&25 


_ 


460 


Fitchhurg . . 


Linwood Street 


B. & L. R.R. . . 


Private 


40 


_ 


400 


Flint .... 


Franklin Street 


Cross Street . . 


Public 


40 


1,020 


_ 


Florence . . . 


Washington St. 


Perkins Street . 


Public 


40 


1,280 


. 


Forest .... 


Beacon Street 


Cambridge Line 


Public 


40 


150 


_ 


Forster . . . 


Sycamore Street 


Central Street . 


Private 


30 




430 


Fountain Ave. 


Cross Street . 


Glen Street . . 


Private 


30 


_ 


550 


Francesca Ave. 


Elm Street . 


Liberty Avenue 


Private 


40 


_ 


740 


Franklin . . . 


Broadway . . 


AVashington St. 


Public 


40+ 


2,230 


- 


Franklin Ave . 


Washington St. 


Franklin Street 


Private 


20 


_ 


500 


Franklin Court 


Somerville Ave. 


B. & L. R.B. . . 


Private 


_ 


_ 


200 


Franklin Place 


Franklin Street 


Southeasterly . 


Private 


15 


_ 


100 


Fremont . . . 


Main Street . 


Northeasterly . 


Private 


40 


_ 


600 


Fremont Ave . 


Parker Street 


Easterly & west'ly 


Private 


30 


_ 


235 


Frost Avenue . 


Somerville Ave. 


Dane Street . . 


Private 


35 


- 


550 


Grarden Court . 


Somerville Ave. 


Fitchburg R.R. 


Private 


25 


_ 


370 


Gartield Avenue 


Broadway . . 


Mystic Avenue . 


Private 


40 


- 


1,150 


Garrison Avenue 


Broadway . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


40 


_ 


850 


George . . . 


Broadway . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


40 


- 


350 


George . . , 


Lincoln Street 


Mt. Vernon Street 


Private 


40 


- 


450 


Gibhens . . . 


Central Street 


Benton Avenue. 


Private 


40 


_ 


400 


Giles Place . . 


Walnut Street 


Northwesterly . 


Private 


32.71 


_ 


168 


Gill's Court 


Franklin Street 


Westerly . . . 


Private 


10 


_ 


100 


Gilman . . . 


Cross Street . 


Walnut Street . 


Public 


40 


1,430 


_ 


Glass House Ct. 


Webster Ave . 


Easterly . . . 


Private 


40 


_ 


200 


Glen .... 


Broadway . . 


Tufts Street . . 


Public 


40 


2,300 


- 


Gorham . , . 


Holland Street 


Howard Street . 


Private 


40 


~ 


-760 



APPEXDICES TO CITY EXGIXEER S REPOET. 



303 









PUBLIC 


WIDTH 


LENGTH. 


STREET. 


FRO 31 


TO 


OR 
PRIVATE. 


i>r 

FEET. 






PUBLIC. 


PRIVATE. 


Grand View Av. 


TValnut Street 


Vinal Avenue . 


Public 


40 


470 




Granite . . . 


Somerville Ave 


Osgood Street . 


Private 


40 




400 


Grant .... 


Broadway . . 


^lystic Avenue . 


Private 


40 


_ 


1..3.50 


Greenville . . 


Medford 'street 


High Street . . 


Private 


40 


- 


650 


Grove .... 


Elm Street . 


Arlington B. R.R. 


Public 


40 


600 


- 


Grove .... 


ArlingtonB.R.R. 


Morrison Street 


Private 


40 


- 


400 


Hadlev Court . 


Franklin Street 


Westerly . . . 


Private 


20 


. 


150 


Hall \ . . . 


Cedar Street . 


Cherrj- Street . 


Private 


30 


_ 


a50 


Hall Avenue . 


Elm Street 


Liberty Avenue 


Private 


40 


_ 


910 


Hamlet . . . 


Highland Ave. 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


30 


. 


400 


Haimnond . . 


Dickinson St . 


Concord Avenue 


Private 


40 


_ 


273 


Hanson . . . 


\yashington St. 


Vine Street . . 


Private 


35 


_ 


750 


Harding . . . 


South Street . 


Cambridge Line 


Private 


30 


_ 


100 


Harris . . . 


Beacon Street 


Cambridge Line 


Private 


35 


_ 


150 


Harrison . . . 


Ivaloo Street . 


Mondamin Ct. . 


Private 


40 


_ 


330 


Harvard . . . 


Summer Street 


Beech Street . . 


Public 


40 


650 




Hathorn . . . 


Inroad way . . 


Arlington Street 


Public 


40 


330 


_ 


Hawkins . . . 


Somerville Ave, 


Washington St. 


Private 


40 




330 


Hawthorne . . 


Willow Avenue 


Northwesterly . 


Private 


30 


_ 


700 


Heath .... 


Temple Street 


Brooks Street . 


Private 


45 


_ 


1,800 


Hennessey Ct. 


Mediord Street 


Fisk Avenue . . 


Private 


20 


_ 


250 


Henry Avenue 


Highland Ave. 


Lexington Ave. 


Private 


40 


_ 


290 


Herbert . . . 


Chester Street 


Day Street . . 


Public 


40 


360 


_ 


Hersev . . . 


Berkeley Street 


Oxtord Street . 


Private 


40 




230 


Hiirh\ . . . 


Boston "street 


Munroe Street . 


Private 


50 


_ 


1,100 


Highland Ave. 


iledlord Street 


Davis Square . 


Public 


60 


9,100 




Hillside Avenue 


Pearl Street . 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


30 




150 


Hillside Park . 


Walnut Street 


Xorthwesterh' . 


Private 


40 


_ 


245 


Hinckley . . 


BroadAvay . . 


Lawrence Street 


Private 


30 


_ 


430 


Hodgdoii Place 


Dane Court . 


Northeasterly . 


Private 


about20 


_ 


150 


Holland . . . 


Davis Square 


Broadway . '. . 


Public 


60 


2,650 


_ 


Holt's Avenue 


Oak Street . . 


Southeasterly . 


Private 


10 




100 


Homer Square 


Bonner Avenue 


Northwesterlv . 


Private 


30+ 


_ 


200 


Horace . . . 


South Street . 


Fitchburg R";R. 


Private 


30 


_ 


510 


Houghton . , 


Prospect Street 


Springfield Street 


Private 


40 


_ 


750 


Howard . . . 


Thorndike St. 


Northwesterly . 


Private 


40 


_ 


560 


Howe .... 


Marshall Street 


School Street . 


Private 


40 


_ 


470 


Hudson . . . 


Cedar Street . 


Central Street . 


Private 


40 


_ 


2,700 


Hunting . . . 


South Street . 


Cambridge Line 


Private 


30 


- 


125 


Irving . . . 


Holland Street 


Broadwav . . . 


Public 


40 


1,180 




Ivaloo . . . 


Beacon Street 


Park ..'... 


Public 


40 


650 


- 


Jackson . . . 


Medford Street 


Maple Street 


Private 


30 




150 


James .... 


Broadway . . 


Holland Street . 


Private 


40 


_ 


775 


James .... 


Pearl Street . 


Veazie Street . 


Private 


40 


_ 


3C0 


Jaques . . . 


Chauncey Ave. 


Bond Street . . 


Public 


40&45 


2,250 




Jasper . . . 


Pearl Street . 


Gilman Street . 


Private 


40 




300 


Jay 


Holland Street 


Howard Street . 


Private 


40 


■ _ 


525 


Jenny Lind Ave. 


Vernon Street 


3Iedford Street 


Public 


40 


910 




Jenny Lind Ave. 


Medford Street 


Broadway . . . 


Private 


40 




590 


Jerouie . . . 


Sycamore Street 


Montrose"^ Street 


Private 


10&20 


_ 


280 


Joseph . . . 


Newton Street 


Northwesterly . 


Private 


40 


_ 


380 


Joy 


Washington St. 


Poplar Street . 


Private 


30 


_ 


1.150 


Joy Street Place 


Joy Street . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


30 


- 


175 


Kensington Ave 


Broadway . . 


Blakeley Avenue 


Private 


40 




440 


Kent .... 


Somerville Ave. 


Beacon \Street . 


Private 


25&40 


_ 


740 


Kent Court . . 


Kent Street . 


Northerly . . . 


Private 


about25 




420. 


Kidder Avenue 


Elm Street 


Libertv Avenue 


Private 


40 




610 


Kingman Court 


Washington St. 


Fitchbiu-g R.R. 


Private 


25 




4no 


Knapp . . . 


School Street 


Granite Street . 


Private 


40 


- 


350 


Lake .... 


Hawkins Street 


Church Street . 


Private 


40 


- 


850 



304 



AI^NUAL REPORTS. 



STREET. 



Lamson Court 
Landers . 
Laurel 
Lawrence 
Lee . . . 
Leiand . 
Leon . . 
Lesley Avenue 
Leslie Place . 
Lexington Ave 
Liberty Avenue 
Lincoln . . . 
Linden . . . 
Linden Avenue 
Linden Avenue 
Linden Place 
Line . . . 
Linehan Court 
Linwood . 
Linwood Place 
London . 
Lorlng . 
Lowell 
Lowell 



Madison . . 
Main . . . 
Malloy Court 
Manslield . 
Maple . . . 
Maple Avenue 
Maple Place 
Marion . . 
Marrett Place 
Marshall . . 
Mason Avenue 
May Place 
Mecliam . 
Mecliam , 
Mecliam . 
Mead . . 
Medford . 
Melrose . 
Melvin 
Merriam . 
Middlesex Ave 
Milk Street PI 
Miller . . . 
Mills . . . 
Miner . , . 
Mondamin Court 
Montgomery Av 
Montrose 
Moore . . 
Morgan . 
Morrison 
*Morrison 
Mortimer Place 
Mossland . . 
Mountain Ave. 
Mousal Place . 
Mt. Pleasant . 
Mt. Pleasant Ct. 
Mt. Pleasant Av. 
Mt. Vernon . . 



FROM 



TO 



Linwood Street 
School Street . 
Somerville Ave 
Hinckley Street 
Medford Street 
Washington St. 
Concord Ave. 
Highland Ave. 
Highland Ave. 
Willow Avenue 
Appleton Street 
Broadway . . 
Somerville Ave. 
Elm Street . . 
Summer Street 
Linden Avenue 
AVashington St. 
Linwood Street 
Somerville Ave. 
Linwood Street 
Linwood Street 
Somerville Ave. 
Somerville Ave 
B. & L. B.R. . 

School Street . 
Broadway . . 
Somerville Ave 
Sonaerville Ave. 
Poplar Street . 
School Street 
White Street . 
Concord Ave. 
Walnut Street 
Broadway . . 
Orchard Street 
Hawkins Street 
Orchard Street 
ArlingtonB.R.R, 
Mt. Vernon Ave, 
Cameron Ave. 
Cambridge Line 
Mystic Avenue 
Bonair Street 
Somerville Ave 
Mystic Avenue 
Somerville Ave 
Sacramento St. 
Walnut Street 
Vernon Street 
Ivaloo Street . 
Broadway . . 
School Street . 
Holland Street 
Beacon Street 
Willow Avenue 
Willow Avenue 
Marshall Street 
Somerville Ave, 
Linden Avenue 
North Union St 
Broadway . . 
Broadway . . 
Curtis Street . 
Washington St. 



Northeasterly . 
Westerly . . . 
Summer Street . 
B. & L. R.R. . . 
Richdale Ave. . 
Northeasterly . 
Dickinson St. . 
Lexington Ave. 
Easterly . . . 
Southeasterly . 
Northeasterly . 
Perkins Street . 
Charlestown St. 
Summer Street . 
Northeasterly . 
Northwesterly . 
Cambridge Line 
Chestnut Street 
Washington St. 
Southwesterly . 
B. & L. R.R. . 
Northeasterly . 
Crown Street . 
Medford Street . 

Sycamore St. . 
Medford Line . 
Southwesterly . 
Washington St. 
Jackson Street . 
Southeasterly . 
Southeasterly . 
Adrian Street . 
Northwesterly . 
Pearl Street . . 
Cambridge Line 
Easterly . . . 
Cambridge Line 
Orchard Street . 
Medford Line . 
Moore Street . 
Medford Line . 
Middlesex Ave. 
Northeasterly . 
Charlestown St. 
Medford Line . 
Southwesterly . 
Northwesterly . 
Sargent Avenue 
Ames Street . . 
Harrison S\. . 
Wellington Av. 
Sycamore St. . 
Mead Street . . 
Park Street . . 
Elm Street . . 
Cedar Street . . 
Southeasterly . 
Elm Street . . 
Porter Street . 
B. & M. R.R. . 
Perkins Street . 
Southwesterly . 
Northwesterly . 
Broadway . . . 



PUBLIC 

OR 

PRIVATE. 



Private 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Private 

Public 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Public 

Private 

Private 

Public 



WIDTH 

IN 
FEET. 



20 

40 

40 

35 

40 

40 

40 

40 

12 

50 

40 

40 

30 

45 

45 

20 

33 
aboutl5 

50 
aboiitl2 

40 

40 

33+ 

33+ 

40 

50 

40 

40 

30 

40 

20 

40 

40 

40 

35 

12 

40 

40 

40 

40 
50&55 

50 

35 

30 

GO 
about30 

33 

40 

40 

25 

40 

40 

40 

40 

40 

40 

20 

40 

22 

20 

33 

40 

40 
40&50 



LENGTH. 



PUBLIC. PRIVATE. 



940 



550 
1,050 



2,050 



950 



1,650 



100 



10,100 



3,400 



1,700 



350 



570 



1,640 



300 

280 

€50 
385 
250 
150 
333 
75 
665 
700 

COO 

250 

160 

1,750 

200 

150 

340 

400 

1,600 

1,150 

850 

:00 

730 
470 
300 
200 
170 
195 

220 
100 

600 
800 
340 

2.200 
150 
500 

100 
350 
500 
245 
250 
265 
850 
1.200 
250 

1,300 
150 

310 
200 

250 

700 



* Proposed. 



APPEXDIOES TO CITY EXGIXEER S REPORT. 



305 



STREET. 



Mt. Vernon Av 
Munroe . . 
Murdock 
Murray . . 
Myrtle . . 
Myrtle Court 
Mystic . . 
Mystic . . 
Mystic Avenue 

Nashua . . . 
Nevada Avenue 
Newberne 
Newbury 
Newton . 
Norfolk . 
North . . 
North Union 
Norwood Ave. 



Oak. . 

Oak. • 

Oak Street Place 

Oakland Avenue 

Olive Square 

Oliver , 

*Orange 

Orchard 

*Orient 

Osgood 

Otis . 

Oxford 

Oxford 

Packard Avenue 
Palmer Avenue 
Park .... 
Park Avenue . 
Parker . . . 
Parker Place . 
Partridge Ave. 
Patten Court . 
Pearl .... 
Pearl Street PI. 
Pembroke . . 
Perkins . . . 
Perkins Place . 
Pinckney . , 
Pitman . . . 
Pleasant Avenue 
Poplar . . . 
Porter . . . 
Porter . . . 
Prescott . . . 
Preston , . . 
Professors' Row 
Prospect . . . 
Prospect Hill Av. 
Prospect Place 
Putnam . . . 

Quincy. . . . 

*Rand .... 
Raymond Ave. 



FROM 



Main Street . 
Walnut Street 
Cedar Street . 
Washington St. 
Washington St. 
Myrtle Street . 
Washington St. 
Benedict Street 
Charlest'n Line 

Appleton Street 
Village Street 
Appleton Street 
Holland Street 
Webster Ave. 
Webster Ave. 
Broadway . . 
Mystic Avenue 
Broadway . . 

Prospect Street 
Angle . . . 
Oak Street . . 
Marshall Street 
Lake Street . 
Franklin Street 
Broadway . . 
Cambridge Line 
Morrison Street 
Granite Street 
Cross Street . 
School Street 
Beacon Street 

Broadway . . 
Franklin*^ Street 
Somerville Ave. 
Elm Street . 
Washington St. 
Porter Street . 
Vernon Street 
Cutter Street . 
Crescent Street 
Pearl Street . 
Central Street 
Franklin Street 
Perkins Street 
Washington St. 
Beech Street . 
AYalnut Street 
Somervnlle Ave. 
Elm Street 
Summer Street 
Summer Street 
School Street . 
('ollege Avenue 
Washington St. 
Medf ord Street 
Prospect Street 
Summer Street 

Somerville Ave. 



TO 



Mecham Street 
High Street . 
Clyde Street . 
Southerly , . 
Perkins Street 
Easterly . , 
Somerville Ave 
Mystic Avenue 
Medf ord Line 

B. & L. R.R. . 

Hanson Street 
Morrison Street 
Cambridge Line 
Concord Ave. . 
Cambridge Line 
Medl ord Line . 
Northeasterly . 
Medf ord Street . 

Angle .... 
Cambridge Line 
Northerly . . . 
School Street . 
Southerly . . . 
Cross Street . . 
Cedar Street . . 
Mecham Street . 
Orange Street . 
East'ly &westry 
Wigglesworth St 
Central Street . 
Cambridge Line 

Medford Line 
Northwesterly 
Beacon Street 
Wallace Street 
Fremont Ave. 
Northwesterly 
Broadway . . 
Southeasterly 
Medford Street 
Northeasterly 
Sycamore Street 
Charlest'n Line 
Northeasterly 
Perkins Street 
Belmont Street 
Vinal Avenue 
Joy Street 
Summer Street 
Brastow Ave. 
Highland Ave. 
Summer Street 
Curtis Street 
Cambridge Line 
High Street . 
Brick-yard Lane 
Highland Ave. . 

Summer Street . 



Morrison Street Orange Street 
Curtis Street . North Street . 



PUBLIC 

OB 

PRIVATE. 


WIDTH 

IX 

FEET. 


LEX 


PUBLIC. 


Private 


.50 




Private 


40 


- 


Private 


30 


_ 


Private 


30 


_ 


Public 


40 


1,400 


Private 


10 


- 


Public 


40 


360 


Private 


40 


- 


Public 


60&66 


7,250 


Private 


3.5 


_ 


Private 


20 


- 


Private 


40 


- 


Public 


40 


1,250 


Public 


40+ 


6.50 


Public 


40 


200 


Public 


40 


2,.5.50 


Private 


30 


- 


Private 


40 


- 


Public 


40 


€70 


Private 


30 


- 


Private 


4 


- 


Public 


40 


440 


Private 


aboutl5 


- 


Public 


40 


1,050 


Private 


40 


- 


Public 


40 


1,625 


Private 


40 


- 


Private 


40 


- 


Public 


40 


1,200 


Private 


30+ 


i 


Public 


50 


100 1 

1 


Private 


60 


1 
_ 1 


Private 


20 


- 


Public 


50 


1,.300 


Public 


40 


450 


Private 


a5 


1 


Private 


20 


. 


Private 


40 


- 


Private 


8 


- 


Public 


40&50 


4,750 


Private 


20 


- 


Private 


40 


- 


Public 


40 


1,350 


Private 


20 . 


- 


Public 


40 


1,170 


Private 


30 


1 


Public 


40 


470 1 


Private 


30&35 


- 


Public 


45 


1,150 


Private 


45 




Public 


50 


1,050 


Public 


40 


800 


Private 


40 




Public 


40&50 


2,050 


Public 


40 


450 


Private 


20 


- 


Public 


50 


1,240 


Public 


40 


700 


Private 


40 


. 


Private 


40 





PRIVATE. 



800 
400 
900 
250 

100 

330 



640 
200 
280 



(00 
350 



530 

So 

100 

1,175 

1,2<0 
450 

1,.3;30 



2,000 
200 



200 

150 

1,-500 

100 

200 

440 

200 
800 
650 
200 

1,900 

130 



1,6.30 
1,350 



Proposed. 



3G6 



xilSriSrUAL KEPORTS. 



STREET. 



Records' Place 
Reed's Court . 
Remick Court 
Riclidale Ave. 
Ride out . 
Robinson 
Roseland 
Rossmore 
Runey 
Rush . . 
Russell . 



Sacramento 
Sanborn Avenue 
Sargent Avenue 
School Street , 
Seilon Court . 
Sewall . . . 
Sewali Court . 
Shawmut . . 
Shawmut Place 
Sherman . . 
Sibley Court . 
Sibley Place . 
Simpson Avenue 
Skehan . . . 
Smith Avenue 
Somerville Ave. 
South . . . 
Spring . . 
Spring Court 
Springfield . 
Stickney . . 
St. James Ave 
Stone Avenue 
Stone Place 
Summer . . 
Summit Avenue 
Sunnyside Ave. 
Sycamore . . 
Sycamore . . 
Sydney . . . 

Taggard Court 
Taylor s Place 
Taylor . . . 
Temple . . . 
Tenney Court . 
Tennyson . . 
Thorndike . . 
Thorpe Place . 
Thurston . . 
Thurston . . 
*Tower . . . 
Tovrer Court . 
Tremont . . . 
Trull .... 
Trull Lane . . 
Tube AVorks Cfc. 
Tuits .... 
Tyler .... 

Union .... 
Union Place . 



FROM 



Broadway . 
Oliver Street 
Cutter . . 
School Street 
South Street 
Central Street 
Beacon Street 
Somerville Ave. 
Cross Street . 
Broadwav . . 
Elm Street . 

Somerville Ave. 
Warren Avenue 
Broadway . . 
Somerville Ave. 
Marshall Street 
Grant Street . 
Sewall Street . 
Washington St. 
Shawmut Street 
Somerville Ave. 
Cutter Street . 
emitter Street . 
Broadwav . . 
Hanson Street 
Beacon Street 
E. Camb. Line 
Medford Street 
Somerville Ave. 
Somerville Ave. 
Concord Ave. 
Marshall Street 
Elm Street . 
Union Square 
Stone Avenue 
Bow Street . 
Walnut Street 
Walnut Street 
Broadway . . 
Medford Street 
"Wheatland St. 

Beacon Street 
Somerville Ave. 
Mystic Avenue 
Broadway . . 
Mystic Avenue 
Foster Street . 
Holland Street 
Highland Ave. 
Broadway . . 
Medford Street 
CroMu Street . 
Tyler Street . 
AVebster Ave. 
Vernon Street 
Highland Ave. 
Somerville Ave. 
AVashington St. 
A^ine Street . 

Broadway . . 
Linwood Street 



TO 



Southwesterly 
Southwesterly . 
Southeasterly . 
Sycamore Street 
Cambridge Line 
Bartlett Street 
Cambridge Line 
AVashington St. 
Aldrich Street 
Flint Street . 
Cambridge Line 

Cambridge Line 
AValnut Street 
Mills Street . 
Broadway . . 
Northwesterly 
Temple Street 
Southwesterly 
Cross Street . 
Alston Street 
Frost Avenue 
Northwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Holland Street 
Dane Street . 
Line Street . 
N. Camb. Line 
AVesterly . . 
Summer Street 
AA^esterly . . 
Cambridge Line 
School Street 
Summer Street 
Columbiis Ave. 
Southeasterly 
Elm Street . 
A^inal Avenue 
AVigglesworth St 
Medford Street 
Highland Ave. 
Temple Street 

Northeasterly 
Southerly . . 
Sydney Street 
Mystic Avenue 
Northea!;ter]y 
Pembroke St. 
ArlingtonB.R.R 
Southwesterly 
Medford Street 
Richdale Ave. 
Highland Ave. 
Northeasterly 
Cambridge Line 
Medford Street 
Oxford Street . 
Southwesterly . 
Cross Street ". . 
Dane Street . . 

Mystic Avenue . 
Southwesterly . 



PUBLIC 


WIDTH 


OR 


i:n 


PRIVATE. 


FEET. 


Private 


10 


Private 


20 


Private 


10 


Private 


40 


Private 


30 


Private 


40 


Public 


40 


Private 


40 


Private 


40 


Public 


40 


Public 


40 


Private 


40 


Private 


40 


Private 


40 


Public 


40&50 


Private 


12 


Private 


40 


Private 


25 


Public 


40 


Private 


30 


Private 


35 


Private 


10 


Private 


10 


Private 


40 


Private 


30 


Private 


25+ 


Public 


70 & 75 


Private 


30 


Public 


35 


Private 


20 


Public 


40 


Private 


40 


Private 


40 


Private 


40 


Private 


30 


Public 


45 


Public 


45 


Private 


35 


Public 


45 


Private 


33&40 


Private 


40 


Private 


15 


Private 


15 


Private 


40 


Public 


66 


Private 


30 


Private 


40 


Private 


40 


Private 


30 


Public 


40 


Private 


40 


Private 


40 


Private 


25 


Private 


40 


Private 


40 


Private 


15 


Private 


20 


Public 


40 


Private 


40 


Public 


40 


Private 


10 



LEKGTH. 



PUBLIC. PRIVATE. 



100 



1,400 
700 



4,370 



550 



11,100 

1,200 

800 



7,700 
470 

1,250 



1,540 



1,350 



940 



330 



110 
105 
100 
850 
115 
645 

525 
760 



600 
300 
450 

120 
650 
190 

200 
270 
100 
100 
825 
300 
200 

940 

200 

450 
488 
675 
145 



250 

1,350 
925 

200 
200 
310 

400 
900 
400 
450 

300 
550 
150 
450 
1,050 
200 
150 

400 



100 



* Prop I sed. 



APPENDICES TO CITY EXGIXEEE S EEPOET. 



30' 









PUBLIC 


WIDTH 


LE>-GTH. 


STKEET. 


FKOM 


TO 


OR 

PKrVATE. 

i 


TX 






'' FEET. 


PUBLIC 


PEIVATE 


Yeazie . . , 


Walnut St. . 


Bradley St. . . 


1 

; Pri-i ate 


i 40 




6.50 


Yemon . . . 


Central St. . 


.Jenny Lind Ave. 


i Public 


' 40 


'' 740 


_ 


Yemon . . . 


Jenny Lind Ave. 


Lowell St. . . 


j Private 


30 




600 


Yilla Avenue . 


AVinslow Ave. 


Arlington B. R.Pt. 


Private 


40 


- 


200 


Yillage . . . 


Dane St. . . 


Yine St. . . . 


' Private 


25 


_ 


370 


Yinal Avenue . 


Summer St. . 


Highland Ave. . 


Public 


45 


1,400 


_ 


Yine .... 


Somerville Ave. 


Beacon St. . . 


i Private 


25 & 40 


_ 


1,400 


Yirginia . . . 


Aldrich St. . 


Jasper St. . . 


1 Private 


40 


- 


350 


Wallace . . . 


HoUand St. . 


Broadway . . . 


Public 


40 


1,.3.50 


_ 


Walnut . . . 


Bow St. . . . 


Broadwav . . . 


Public 


40 


3,830 


_ 


Ward .... 


Medford St. . 


Earl St.' . . . 


Private 


30 


_ 


610 


Warren . , . 


Medford St. . 


Cambridge Line 


Private 


30 


- 


100 


Warren Avenue 


Union Sq. . . 


Columbus Ave. 


Public 


40 


650 


_ 


Warwick. . . 


Cedar St. . . 


Southeasterly. . 


Private 


40 


_ 


630 


AVashington . 


Charlest'n Line 


Cambridge Line 


Public 


60 to 100 


7,2.50 


_ 


Washington Av. 


Washington St. 


Northerly . . . 


Private 


18 


_ 


350 


Water. . . . 


South St. . . 


Northerly . . . 


Private 


25 


_ 


2.50 


Waverly . . . 


Washington St. 


Southerly . . , 


Private 


35 


_ 


200 


Weare . . . 


Curtis St. . . 


Northwesterlv . 


Private 


40 


_ 


700 


Webster . . . 


Franklin St. . 


Cross St. . .' . 


Public 


40 


1,000 


_ 


Webster Avenue 


Union Sq. . . 


Cambridge Line 


Public 


49.5 


1,950 


- 


Wellington Ave. 


AValnut St. . 


Southeasterly . 


Private 


40 


_ 


300 


Wesley . . . 


Otis St. . . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private 


30 


_ 


150 


Wesley Park . 


Wesley Sq. . 


Northeasterly . 


Private 


40 


_ 


405 


West .... 


Broadway . . 


Heath St. . . . 


Private 


30 


_ 


250 


West .... 


Hawi;horhe St. 


Arlington B. R.R. 


Private 


30 


_ 


590 


Weston Avenue 


Clarendon Ave. 


Broadway . . . 


Private 


40 


_ 


52.5 


Wheatland . . 


Broadway . . 


Mvstic Ave. . . 


Private 


40 


_ 


1,350 


Whipple . . . 


Hawthorne St. 


Arlington B. R.R. 


Private 


30 


_ 


575 


Wig^lesworth . 
William . . , 


Bonair St. . . 


Southwesterlv . 


Private 


40 


_ 


500 


Chandler St. . 


Elm St. . ". . 


Private 


40 


- 


400 


Williams Court 


Porter St. . . 


Northwesterly . 


Private 


30 


_ 


1.50 


Willoughby . 


Central St. . 


Sycamore St. . 


Private 


30 


- 


400 


Willow Avenue 


Elm St. . . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public 


50 


3,440 


- 


Willow Place . 


Cambridge Line 


South St. . . . 


Private 


25 


- 


150 


Wilson Avenue 


Broadwav . . 


Cedar St. . . . 


Private 


20 


_ 


475 


AYilton . . . 


Lowell St. . . 


Lawrence St. . 


Private 


35 


_ 


470 


Winslow Avenue 


Elm St. . . . 


Grove St. . . . 


Private 


40 


_ 


470 


Winter . . . 


Elm St. . . . 


Holland St. . . 


Private 


30 


_ 


430 


Winthrop Ave. 


BroadAvav . . 


Mvstic Ave. . . 


Public 


50 


1,170 


- 


Woodbine . . 


Centre St. . . 


Lowell St. . . 


Private 


30 




600 


Wvatt. . . . 


Concord Ave. 


Northerly . . . 


Private 


40 


- 


400 


Wyatt Court . 


Wyatt St. . . 


Westerly . . . 


Private 


13 


- 


200 


Total . . . 


225,152 


168,596 



Public, 42.64 miles; private, 31.90 miles. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



I]sr BoAKD OF Aldermen, Jan. 3, 1889. 

Accepted and referred to the next city council, to be printed in the annual 
reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEOKGE I. YINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Jan. 3, 1889. 

Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. KOBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF S0.MERV1LLE. 



Ix Committee ox Fire Departmext, 

Jail, 3, 1889. 
To the City Council. 

The following is the final report of the Committee on Fire 
Department for the j^ear ending Dec. 31, 1888 : 

The annual report of the Chief Engineer, herewith presented, 
gives all information as to the organization, equipment and 
operation of the department during the year. 

A new hose wagon, with light ladders attached, costing 
$496.05, has been substituted for the hose carriage, with the 
old-fashioned reel, heretofore used by the company in Ward One. 

Life saA^ng apparatus has been provided, as required by 
Chapter 310, Section 1, of the laws of 1888, at a cost of $130. 

Five horses have been bought and the same number of old 
ones sold. 

The "R. A. Yinal" ladder-truck, built in 1874, is so exceed- 
ingly heavy that it has been out of service for some time past, 
and the old " Prescott " truck has been used temporarily. A 
suitable truck has been ordered of Messrs. Teele & Co. of Med- 
ford, but has not, as yet, been delivered. 

In pursuance of an order passed by the City Council, and 
approved Sept. 28, a contract was made Oct. 8, with Messrs. 
Coon & Hall, for the erection of a brick hose-house on the City's 
land at the corner of Somerville Avenue and Lowell Street, in 
accordance vdth plans by E. K. Blaikie, architect, for the sum of 
$9,837. The first floor is on, and the walls are in process of 

erection. 

« 

This building was located on Somerville Avenue, contrary to 
the recommendation of this committee, the committee believing 
it should have been placed on Spring Hill. 



312 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The appropriation, receipts, and expenditures are shown by 
the following statements : 

FIRE DEPARTMENT ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 
Appropriation . . . . |27,000 00 
Receipts for property sold . - . 100 33 



Total credit . . . . . |27,100 33 

1)ebit. 
Expenses : — 

For salaries of pernrianent men . 19,780 00 

" -' call-men . . 4,898 09 

substitute drivers . . . 487 42 

improvements and repairs of 

apparatus and vehicles , 561 06 

improvements and repairs of 

buildings and furniture and 

new furniture 
new vehicles and apparatus . 
maintenance and extension of 

fire alarm telegraph . 
hose and hose pipes and re- 
pairing same 
new horses, — five old ones 

given in trade and 
grain and feed 
hay and straw 
horse shoeing 

horse doctoring and medicine 
harnesses, and repairing same 
fuel . . . 
supplies .... 

water for hydrants 

" " department build- 



Amounts carried foricard . 825,493 15 $27,100 33 



1,299 


28 


626 


05 


1,261 


10 


52 


96 


1,185 


00 


600 


07 


906 


72 


256 


50 


131 


35 


242 


60 


1,065 


79 


186 


16 


1,848 


00 


105 


00 


825,493 


15 



EEPORT OF COMMITTEE OX FIEE DEPAETMEXT. 313 

Amounts hrovgl it forward . 825,493 15 127,100 33 



gas 


378 80 


insurance .... 


15 00 


washing and ironing 


136 30 


maintenance of reservoirs 


2 00 


" " hand fire-ex- 




tinguishers 


50 42 


telephone .... 


74 40 


incidentals .... 


508 81 


ice ..... 


85 00 



Total debit $26,743 88 



Balance unexpended . . . . |356 45 

HOSE HOUSE IX WARD FOUR ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 
Appropriation 810,000 00 

Debit. 



Expenditures : — 






For committee's travelling ex- 






penses to and from \Yor- 






cester .... 


$ 


13 40 


Coon & Hall, on account of 






contract . . . 




2,500 00 



Total debit $2,513 40 

Balance unexj^ended .... $7,486 60 

For the committee, 

BERXARD W. LAWREXCE, Chairman. 
GEO. I. VIXCEXT, CUrk, 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Keferred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual re- 
ports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. ROBEETSON", Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERYILLE. 



SoMEKViLLE, 3Iass., Jan. 3, 1889. 
To the Committee on Fire Department. 

Gextlemex : — I present a report of the operations of the 
Fire Dejoartment for the year 1888, together with a statement of 
the department's present condition and immediate needs. 

MAXUAL FOECE. 

Sixty-one men compose the worldng force of the department, 
divided as follows : 

One chief . . ....... 1 

One assistant ......... 1 

One steam fire-engine company ..... 12 

Four hose companies, eight men each .... 32 

One hook and ladder company . . . . . 15 

Total 61 

Of these, S. F. E. Co. Xo. 1 has one engineer, one assistant en- 
gineer or fireman, and two drivers, permanently emj^loyed. Each 
hose and the hook and ladder company has a diiver similarly em- 
ployed, and all the other members are what are commonly desig- 
nated as " call men." 

APPARATUS. 

This consists of one steam fire-engine, with hose carriage, three 
hose carriages, one hose wagon, and one hook and ladder truck. 

There are also, one old steam fire-engine, one hose carriage, and 
one hook and ladder truck that are available for use in the events 
of accidents or repairs to the apparatus in regular service. It 
should be said, however, that this contingent cannot be employed. 



318 AI^^NUAL EEPOKTS. 

in emergency, as promptly as could be desired, since reliance 
must be placed uj)on the horses of the regular apparatus, and 
these cannot be employed until after their immediate and most 
urgent duties have been performed. 

HOSE. 

There are in service 8,000 feet of hose, ^o new hose was 
bought during the year ; but a quantity must be purchased, in 
the near future, to replace that which has become unserviceable. 
The importance of this article of equipment is too obvious to be 
dwelt upon. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

There are now in the city 40 miles of wire, 41 signal boxes, 
6 bell strikers, and 18 gongs. 

As I have often said, the importance of keeping this branch of 
the service in perfect working order cannot be over-estimated. 
It is the warning and directing agent of our whole fire system, 
and the possibilities consequent upon its disarrangement are of 
the most serious nature. It need but be remembered that our 
reliance is almost entirely upon a call department to emj^hasize 
this fact. 

The care of the fire-alarm telegraph has thus far devolved upon 
the permanent men of the steamer company, detailed for duty by 
the chief of department, and their duties are the cleaning and 
management of the battery and electrical apparatus, and the 
care and repairing of lines, bell strikers, and gongs under all cir- 
cumstances. When these men are thus engaged the regular 
service is unavoidably weakened, and it often happens that but 
one man is left in quarters with but two horses to perform the 
duties which our citizens are justified in expecting to have satis- 
factorily performed by the full force at a moment's notice. I, 
therefore, renew my recommendation that a line man be specially 
employed, who shall sleep in the engine house, and, under the 
direction of the chief, have charge of all matters pertaining to 
this essential mechanism. I also recommend the placing of addi- 
tional boxes for the protection of sections of the city as yet re- 
mote. 



EEPOPvT OF CHLEF EXGI^'EEE OF FIRE DEPAETMEXT. 319 



LADDER SERVICE. 

The location of H. & L. truck Xo. 1 on the south side of the 
city affects the efficiency of the service in Ea^t Somer^'ille and at 
AVinter Hill. This was, like^dse, the case at West Somerville 
until an apparatus to carry ladders was placed in the house of 
Hose No. 4. 

The new hose wagon in East Somerrille is equipped with 
ladders, and a similar piece of apparatus should be placed in the 
Winter Hill hose house in place of the carriage now in use. 
With this materiel ., properly manned, the necessity for another 
ladder truck and company will be obviated for many years. 

I recommend that an additional permanent man be employed 
on Hose 4, and another on Hose 1, that the demands, which are 
daily growing more imperative, may be properly met. 

This matter of an increased j^ermanent force deserves serious 
consideration ; for, howeyer good the aj^paratus may be, howeyer 
complete the devices for quick hitching and celerity, they are, in 
a measure, neutralized by the limited number of permanent men 
at present employed, and the reliance which must be placed upon 
the call system. 

A new light H. & L. truck, to replace the heayy truck now 
discarded, will be ready in January. I have confidence that the 
wisdom of the committee on Fire Department, in thus assuring 
the quick arrival at fires of one of our most important pieces of 
apparatus, will be duly appreciated. 

BUILDIXGS. 

The seyeral buildings used by the department are in good 
order, and the ex^^ense of keeping them so will be but nominal, 
unless alterations are made to furnish accommodations for ad- 
ditional apparatus. This statement is, perhaps, somewhat 
strained when applied to the hose house on Webster Street, which 
building is constantly requiring repairs. A new fire station will 
soon be needed in that section. 

A new hose house is being erected on the corner of Somerville 
Ayenue and Lowell Street. It will be completed early in the 
spring, when a comj)any and ai3j)aratus will be provided. 



320 



A]Sr]S^UAL KE POETS. 



CHEMICAL E:N^GI^E. 

Experience has demonstrated the value of these engines in all 
places, especially in cities which, like Somerville, have many 
wooden buildings with shingled roofs. This city needs such an 
engine, and it should be located at the corner of Highland Avenue 
and Walnut Street, because of the central location. This would 
necessitate the alteration or widening of the steamer house which 
would then be of inestimable value, not only as the repository of 
apparatus, but for all the purposes of the fire-alarm telegraph. 

STEAM FIKE ENGINE . 

Somerville should have either another steam fire engine or an 
increased water pressure. As the question of increased pressure 
for domestic and fire purposes is being discussed, I will only say 
that either an increased gravity pressure must be supplied, or 
else more steam power must be furnished to increase the pressure 
we now have. 

That this matter may be practically exemplified, I submit for 
your consideration the accompanying table, compiled from esti- 
mates made from actual tests by that eminent civil engineer, Geo. 
A. Ellis. 



Pressure in 

lbs. at 

Hydrant. 



20 
22 
26 
34 
30 
30 
31 
41 
40 
41 
42 
51 
50 
50 
51 



Feet of 
Hose. 



300 
500 
700 

1,000 
300 
500 
700 
300 
600 
700 

1,000 
300 
500 
700 

1,000 



Effect of 
Pressure 
at Nozzle. 



12 
10 
10 
10 
18 
14 
12 
25 
19 
16 
13 
31 
24 
20 
16 



Gallons 
Disch'gd. 



84 

77' 

77 

77 

104 

92 

84 

122 

107 

98 

89 

136 

120 

110 

98 



Hori- 


Ver- 


zontal 


tical 


Dist. 


Dist. 


54 


26 


49 


22 


49 


22 


49 


22 


66 


39 


58 


30 


54 


26 


80 


52 


68 


41 


62 


35 


56 


28 


92 


64 


78 


50 


70 


43 


62 


35 



Loss 

at 

Nozzle. 



12 

16 
24 
12 
16 
19 
16 
21 
25 
29 
20 
26 
30 
35 



Estimated at 1 inch Nozzle, Rubber Hose, on Level Ground. 



REPORT OF CHIEF EXGIXEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 321 

Water is to the firemen what powder is to the soldier, and each 
adequately supplied with his peculiar ammunition is j^repared for 
any emergency. 

On the elevated j^ortions of our city, property is constantly 
jeopardized by the lack of sufficient water pressure, and should 
there be a threatenino^ fire in any of such sections, that would 
require the simultaneous use of several hydrants, our hydrant 
system would be found practically useless by all the companies 
save that of the single steamer now in service ; and in case of an 
accident to that engine, very unpleasant possibilities can readily 
be conceived. 

True, our neiorhboring; cities and towns are ever readv to render 
assistance ; bu^, by their so doing, we incur a debt which should 
be paid in kind, on occasion, but which could not be so rej^aid, 
under existing conditions, T\^thout imperiling our own munici- 
pality. Attention cannot be too soon nor too earnestly directed 
^ to this question. 

HORSES. 

Hose carriage Xo. 2, and H. & L. truck Xo. 1, Avere furnished 
with two new horses each, also one new horse for the steamer, 
and horses are greatly needed for hose carriage Xo. 3. 



ALARMS. 

There were 42 bell alarms during the year, attributable to the 
following named causes : 

Incendiary .......... 4 

1 
1 
5 
3 
3 
1 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 



Fire <yackers 
Rats and matches 
Breaking of kerosene lamps 
Chimney fires 
Sparks on roofs . 
Explosion of powder . 
Sparks from tobacco-j^ipe . 
Children playing with matches 
Live coals from stove 
Brick oven resting on wood 
Burning of rubbish 



322 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Fire in Medford 
Defective stove-pipes 
S]3arks from cooper's oven . 
Thawing water-pipes . 
Unknown . . . - . 
Sparks in wood-box near stove 
Drying plastering 
Lamp in contact with clothing 
Grass fires .... 
Boiling OA^er of kettle 
S23arks from forge 
Sj)arks from fire-box of boiler 

The total number of still alarms was seven. 

The loss by fire was . . ... 

Insurance ....... 

Insurance paid ...... 



$4,238 50 
21,250 00 

3,868 00 



To his Honor the Mayor, the Committee on Fire Department, 
the members of the City Council, the ofiicers and members of the 
Police and Fire DejDartments, and to our citizens generally, my 
thanks are due for prompt and hearty co-operation, at all times 
and under all circumstances, during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



JAMES R. HOPKIXS, 

Chief of Department. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON FUEL AND ST. LIGHTS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



li^ BoAKD OF Aldekmen, Jail. 3, 1889, 

Ordered to be filed with the city clerk for presentation to the next city 
council, to be printed in the annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEOKGE I. YI:N"CENT. Clerk. 



In Common Councii,, Jan. 3, 1889. 
Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Ix CoM:NnTTEE ox FcEL AXD Steeet Lights, 

Jan. 3, 1889. 

To the City Council of Somermlle. — 

The following 13 the JSnal report of the Cominittee on Fuel 
and Street Li<:^hts for the year ending Dec. 31, 1888. 



SCHOOL 


FUEL ACCOUXT. 








Ceedit. 










Appropriation 


Debit. 


• 


• 


$6,500 


00 


Expenditures : — 












For fuel to Beach Street School 


■s 90 


65 






Bell 




535 


13 






Bennett 




179 


64 






Bingham 




. 294 


00 






Brastow 




79 


70 






Bui'ns 




218 


28 






Cedar Street 




44 


13 






CnTmnirio-s 




95 


85 






Davis 




861 


16 






Edgerly 




. 1,055 


35 






Elm Street 




80 


58 






Forster 




. 549 


00 






Franklin 




230 


25 






Harvard 


ard . 


5 


68 






Amounts carried forw 


S3,819 


30 


$6,500 


00 



326 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



imotmts brought forward . 


$3,819 30 


High School 


537 07 


Highland " 


691 00 


Jackson " 


181 85 


Lincoln " 


362 54 


Morse " 


243 50 


Prescott " 


694 00 


Prospect Hill " 


202 64 


Spring Hill '' 


39 73 


School room, Somerville 




Avenue 


18 63 


Union .... 


45 88 


Webster 


276 60 


Incidentals (fuel book) . 


8 50 


Total debit . . 


. 


Amount overdrawn . 


• 


STREET LIGHTS ACCOUNT. 


Credit. 





;,5oo 00 



Appropriation . . . . . 
Receipts : — 

For new lamps erected . $40 00 
repairs of lamps damaged 

by teams . . . 13 00 



I 53 00 

posts and lanterns on hand Jan. 1 212 00 



$7,121 24 
$621 24 



$16,000 00 



265 00 



Total credit . 



$16,265 00 



Debit. 
Expenditures : — 
For gas, — 

to Cambridge Gas Light Co. 
to Charlestown Gas Co. . 

Amounts carried forward 



11,901 75 
. 1,739 06 



$3,640 81 $16,265 00 



REPORT OF com:mittee o:n' euel axd street lights. 327 

Amounts carried forvmrd . . $3,640 81 816,265 00 
lighting and care of gas and oil 

lamps 2,236 43 

electric lig^hts 

maintenance . . |9,449 43 

braces . . . 8 58 

$9,458 01 

new gas lamps . . . . 71 05 

repairs of gas and oil lamps . 339 45 
supplies (oil, alcohol, wicks, 

matches, torches, etc.) . . 209 55 
discontinuing gas and oil lamps 13 00 

moving gas lamps . . . 3 88 

street signs .... 5 00 

incidentals . . . . 24 70 

posts and lanterns on hand (10 

posts and 13 sign lanterns) . 163 25 



Total debit $16,165 13 



Balance unexpended . . . $99 87 



FUEL. 

Such fuel as was required during the first six months of the 
year was bought of Messrs. B. F. Wilde & Co. and Horatio 
Wellington & Co. at market rates. 

Under an order passed June 13, and 14, proposals were soli- 
cited to furnish such fuel as might be required at the various 
public buildings during the year commencing July 1 ; and, in 
response, proposals were received to furnish fuel, for the the 
next thirty days only, from Messrs. G. T. Burnham & Co., B. F. 
Wilde & Co., and Horatio Wellington & Co., all at the following 
prices : Furnace coal, per ton, $5.35 ; egg^ 15.60 ; and stove, 
15.85 ; hard wood, per cord, |9, and soft wood, $7.50. 

A contract for thirty days from. July 1, was made with Messrs. 
Wilde ife Co. for fuel for the buildings on the north side of the 



328 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

city, and with Messrs. Wellington & Co. for the remainder, and 
the bins were filled to their utmost capacity. Since the expira- 
tion of these contracts, such purchases as were necessary have 
been made of the same parties at the current prices. 



STEEET LIGHTS. 

^ GAS AND OIL. 

The price for gas in the four-feet burner lamps was $1.65 
per thousand feet to Aug. 1, and $1.55 from that date to the 
end of the year. 

In the two thirty-feet lamps, one of which is supplied by the 
Charlestown Company and the other by the Cambridge Com- 
pany, the price paid the last-named company was $1.50 through- 
out the year, and the former company 61.65 to Aug. 1, and 
$1.55 for the balance of the year. The gas and oil lamps are 
lighted every night until 12.30 o'clock, except when the moon is 
shining clear. They have been burning 283 nights in the past 
year. 

ELECTRIC. 

By authority of the City Council, the contract mth the Som- 
erville Electric Light Company, which expired June 1, was 
extended for one j^ear. 

Fifty-four lights were in service Jan. 1, and sixteen were 
added in the first two months of the year, making the present 
number seventy, which is the limit fixed by the City Council. 

The new lights are the property of the company, and have 
been placed on the com23any's poles without expense to the city. 
The price for lighting is thirty-seven cents j)er night, for each 
lamp, and the lamps burn every night until one o'clock. 

TAventy-six gas and three oil lamps have been discontinued 
by reason of the erection of electric lamps. 

The following is a table of street lamps in the city : — 



EEPOET OF CO:M:inTTEE OX FUEL AXD STEEET LIGHTS. 329 



GAS la:mps. 



Charles- 
tovjn. 



Cam- 
bridge. 











§ 2 
























'^ E3 


o 


^ 


-f! ^ 


r-' 


■ • 


'-' 


^ 





in 




ft 




g 


m 




j; 


o 






c3 


^4 


tJ 


+3 

o 


f— I 


<o 






o 


s 



o 
H 



Lamxjs in the city. Jan. 1, ISSS, as per 
last report 

Erected during the year at the expense 
of abutters 

Erected during the year at the expense 
of company 


170 
2 


1 


190 


1 


78 
3 


54 
16 


494 

5 

16 


Discontinued because of the erection of 
electric lamps . . 


172 

9 
163 

1 




190 
19 


.1 


81 
3 


70 


515 
31 


Discontinued because of the electric 
lamps, and now re-established 




171 
1 


1 


78 


70 


484 

2 


Changed from oil to gas, omitted in last 
report ...... 


164 




172 

2 


1 


78 
2 


70 


486 


Error in report for the year 1887 . 


164 
1 




174 
1 


1 


76 


70 


486 




163 




175 


1 


76 


70 


486 



For the committee, 

T. C. DTTTER, Chairman. 
GEO. I. YIXCEXT, Clerk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Jan. 3, 1889. 

Ordered to be filed with the city clerk for presentation to the next city 
council, to be printed in the annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEOKGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Jan. 3, 1889. 
Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Ix Committee ox Public Peopekty, Jan. 3, 1889. 

To the City Coimcil of Somerville. 

The committee on public property presents the following final 
report for the year 1888 : — 

POLICE STATION IXCIDEXTALS ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 

Appropriation $2,000 00 

Transfer from school-house in Ward 

Three account . . . . 349 07 
Transfer from school-house in Ward 

Four account .... 204 45 
Receipts for rent of halls . . . 568 00 

$3,121 52 



Total credit . 




Debit. 




Expenditures : — 




For ianitor's salary 


$750 00 


janitor's substitute in vacation 


14 00 


gas 


503 59 


fuel 


488 45 


water ..... 


63 00 


insurance ..... 


75 00 


repairs and improvements on build- 




ing and furniture 


879 71 


incidentals . . . . 


25 91 



Total debit ... 2,799 66 



Balance unexpended . . $321 86 



334 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

SCHOOL-HOUSE INCIDENTALS ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 

Appropriation ; . . $10,000 00 
Transfer from miscellaneous account . 1,700 00 
" " watering streets " . 1,000 00 
Recipts for use of ward room in school- 
house 3 00 

Receipts for junk sold from school-house 8 81 



Total credit . 


• 


$12,711 81 


Debit. 






Expenditures : — 






For repairs .... 


. $6,130 48 




improvements 


. 5,391 90 




furniture .... 


. 1,325 98 




rent ..... 


. 456 91 




insurance .... 


. 446 25 




emptying privy vaults 


. 108 00 




sidewalk and sewer assessments 


. 114 73 




carriage hire 


10 00 




account books 


9 50 




Total debit . 




13,993 75 


Amount overdrawn 


• $1,281 94 



Expenditures at the different school-houses are as follows : 

Beach Street. 

Repairs (including new front and back 
steps and reshingling west side 
of roof) . . . $297 23 

Emptying privy vaults . . . 56 00 



$353 23 
Amount carried forward .... $353 23 



KEPOKT OF COMMITTEE OX PUBLIC PROPERTY. 335 

Amount brought for v:ard .... $353 23 

Luther V. Bell. 
Repairs 1334 59^ 

Improvements : — 

constructing new room $427 79 

heating apparatus for 

water closets . . 384 27 

partitions and ventila- 
tion in water closets 191 27 

radiator in office . 50 03 

concreting . . 528 57 

$1,581 93 

Sidewalk assessment . . . . 65 31 

Furniture 208 50 

Insurance . . . . . . 75 00 

$2,265 33 



Bennett. 

Repairs $103 04 

Emptying privy vaults . . . 16 00 



Bingham. 

Repairs $28 53 

Furniture 34 00 

Insurance . . . . . . 75 00 



Brastow. 
Repairs (including painting outside 

and new front fence) 
Emptying privy vaults 

Burns. 

Repairs ...... 

Furniture ...... 

Insurance ...... 

Amount carried forward 



$119 04 



$137 53 



$246 43 
8 00 


$254 43 

$231 05 
$3,360 61 


$122 05 
34 00 
75 00 





336 AI^NUAL REPORTS. 

Amount hroicght forioard . . . . $3,360 61 

Cedar Street. 

Repairs (including painting outside, 
rebuilding fence and shingling 
shed) $167 87 

Emptying privy vaults . . . 8 00 

$175 87 



Cuinmings. 

Repairs $52 01 

Furniture 9 33 

$61 34 

Clarendon J^lock. 
Rent for month of August, 1887 $22 91 

Dams. 



Repairs (including $176.22 on furnaces) $234 64 
Furniture 13 43 



Edgerly. 

Repairs (including painting tin roof) . $ 279 80 
Improvements (new water closets and 

urinals) 1,095 35 

Furniture 92 18 



Ehn Street. 

Repairs $24 15 

Furniture ..... . 62 50 

Rent . . . . . . . 300 00 



$248 07 



$1,467 33 



$386 65 

Eherle JBidldmg. 

Furniture and fitting up .... . $101 37 

Amount carried forvmrcl .... $5,824 15 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE OX PUBLIC PROPERTY. 337 



Amount hrougid forward .... $5,824 15 

Forster. 

Repairs (including tinting and whiten- 
ing upper story, repairing and 
painting tin roofs, and rebuilding 
fence south side) . . . $467 70 
Improvements : — 

Two new radiators and pip- 
ing for upper south 
and east rooms . $277 34 

partitioning water closets 27 30 

8304 64 

Furniture 103 97 

Insurance . . . . . . 75 00 

— $951 31 



Franklin. 
Repairs (including painting outside) . . . $542 04 

Hill B^dlding, 

Rent $100 00 

Furniture, and fitting up room . . 142 11 

6242 11 



Harvard. 
Repairs $ 68 02 

High. 
Repairs $539 12 

Improvements : — 

Two schoolrooms in hall . |654 96 
Two closets, one for books 
and one for drawing 

utensils ... 82 46 

■ $737 42 

Insurance . . . . . . 75 00 

Furniture 319 85 

$1,671 39 



Amount carried forvmrd .... $9,299 02 



338 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amotmt hr ought forioard .... $9,299 02 

Highland. 

Repairs (including tinting and whiten- 
ing entire building and $153.59 
on furnaces . . . . $379 68 

Improvements (concreting in girls' 

yard) 207 00 

Sewer assessment . . . . 49 42 

$636 10 



Jackson. 
Repairs (including painting outside) . . . $449 57 

Lincoln. 

Repairs (including $181.26 on fur- 
naces) $268 72 

Morse. 

Repairs (including $52.07 stove work) $150 52 

Improvements : — 

Concrete walks in both yards $295 20 

new entrances, steps and 

wooden walk in boys' 

yard . . . . 46 77 

341 97 

Furniture ...... 16 50 

_ _ $508 99 



Prescott. 

Repairs (including new grate bars for 

boiler, and painting fences) . $498 34 
Improvements : — 

ISTew porticos to entrances to 
school-houses and water 
closets . . . 1645 42 
concreting girls' yard . 478 17 

11,123 59 



Amounts carried forward ' . $1,621 93 $11,162 40 



EEPOET OF COMMITTEE OX PUBLIC PEOPEETT. 339 

Amounts Irovglitforviard . .§1,621 93 §11,162 40 
Furniture . . . . . . 51 45 

Insui-ance ...... 71 25 

$1,744 63 



Prospect Hill. 

Eepairs §76 35 

Furniture . . . . . . 6 50 



188 Somerville Avenue. 

Rent 8 34 00 

Furnit ure and fitting up . . . 105 12 



Sirring Hill. 

Repairs (including re -shingling) . . 8176 57 
Furniture . . . . . , 25 17 



Union. 

Repairs §110 53 

Emptying privy vaults . . . 4 00 



§82 85 



ei39 12 



S201 74 



$114 53 



Webster. 

Repairs (including painting outside) §512 98 
Emptying privv vaults . . . 16 00 , 

§528 98 

Total §13,974 25 

Carriage hii^e ....... 10 00 

Account books ....... 9 50 



Total expenditure .... §13,993 75 



SCHOOL-HOUSE IX WARD TWO ACCOTJXT. 

Ceedit. 
Appropriation : — 

Balance from tlie year 1887 . . . §4,177 55 



Amount carried forward . . . . §4,177 55 



340 ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 

Ainoimt brought forward .... $4,177 55 

Debit. 

Expenditure : — 

Paid Oren S. Knapp, attorney, — 
for Anna S. Clark, guardian, 
for lots 10 and 16 Concord 
Square and Adrian Street, 
8,424 square feet, at 20c. . $1,684 80 

for Anna S. Clark, for lots 11, 
12, 15, and part of 14, Concord 
Square and Adrian Street, 
13,558.5 square feet, at 20c. . 2,711 70 

for Mary C. Clark, for lot 17 
Adrian Street, 2,535 square 
feet, at 20c. . . . 507 00 



Total expenditure .... 4,903 50 



Amount overdrawn . . . . $725 95 



SCHOOL-HOUSE IN WARD THREE ACCOUNT. 

{Bingham^ 

Credit. 

Appropriation : — 

Balance from the year 1887 . $395 11 

Less transfer to police station 

incidentals account . . 349 07 



Net credit $46 04 

Debit. 

Expenditures : — 

For carpentering, E. Shapleigh's 

unsettled bill of 1887 46 04 



REPOET OF COMMITTEE OX PUBLIC PEOPEETT. 341 

SCHOOL-HOUSE IX WARD FOUR ACCOUXT. 

{JBurns.) 

Credit. 

Appropriation : — 

Balance from the year 1887 . 8250 48 

Less transfer to police station 

incidentals account . . 204 45 



Xet credit 846 03 

Debit. 

Expenditure : — 

For carpentering, E. Shapleigh's 

unsettled bill of 1887 46 03 



CITY HALL IMPROVEMEXTS ACCOUXT. 

Credit. 
Appropriation 83,000 00 

Debit. 

Expenditures : — 

Carpenter's contract, — paid 

F. C. Fuller . . . $2,619 62 
tinting and frescoing, paid 

Walburg & Woehrn . . 250 00 

movino; and resettino; radi- 

ators, paid A. A. Sanborn, 40 83 

gilding radiators, paid F. P. 

Wallgreen . . . 43 50 



Total debit 82,953 95 



Balance unexpended .... 46 05 



342 



an:n'ual reports. 



EXPENDITURES BY THIS COMMITTEE ON 
MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNT. 



City Hall expenses : — 

gas 

fuel 

water . 

ice 

telephone connections 

insurance 

repairs and furniture 

incidentals 



$318 62 

246 90 

16 80 

35 00 

48 30 

11 00 

1,587 19 

178 38 



Preparing rooms for elections and caucuses 

Rent of rooms " " " " ' 

Repairing ballot-boxes 

Distributing and collecting ballot-boxes 

Boards for posting cbeck-lists 

Preparing hall for inauguration . 

Expense of auction sale of Bond Street Ledge 
lot, — auctioneer's charges and advertis- 
ing ....... . 

Care of flag- staff on police building 

Work at cemetery on Somerville avenue 

Ringing bells on holidays ..... 

Rental seven sets telephone instruments in 
public buildings, from Sept. 1, 1887, to 
Sept. 1, 1889 

Badges for assessors ...... 

Expenses on Rifle Range : — 

work on buildings and butts 

(in 1887),— ... $76 02 

painting . . . . 13 84 

insurance .... 6 00 



^2,442 19 

28 36 
27 00 

5 25 
12 00 
15 93 

5 00 



52 08 

19 30 

15 00 

9 00 



210 00 
12 25 



At7i ounts carried for icard 



$95 86 $2,853 36 



EEPOET OF C0M:MITTEE OX PUBLIC PEOPERTT. 343 

Amoirnts lyronght fory:ard . $95 86 $2,853 36 

rent of land, one year, from 
Oct. 1, 1887, to Oct. 1, 
1888 .... 150 00 

245 86 



City Messenger's team : — 

maintenance .... 8392 63 

new horse (exclusive of re- 
ceipt for old horse, as stated 
below) .... 250 00 



642 63 



Total expenditure .... -^3,741 85 

Less receipts : — 

• for messenger's old horse . 865 00 

portions of old flag staff (for- 
merly in Union Square) . 9 03 

74 03 



Xet expenditure . . ... 83,667 82 



POLICE STATIOX IXCIDEXTALS ACCOUXT. 

The wardrobes used for Company M, Eighth Regiment 
M. V. M., at the armory in the police building, were not suitable, 
and were located in the non-commissioned oflicers' rooms, which 
were thus rendered practically useless for the jjurpose for which 
they were intended and needed. After a presentation of the 
case to this committee by the officers of the company, the old 
closets were removed, and fifty new ones were placed in the 
armory proper for the use of the men, and nine for the non- 
commissioned officers in their rooms. The cost of the closets 
was 1472.75, besides an expense of 850.38 for making necessary 
chano-es in the locations of radiators and g-as fixtures. 

The introduction of the Police Signal System, and the estab- 
lishment of the patrol wagon, rendered a rear entrance to the 
police building necessary to give ready communication with the 
stable ; and such entrance has been made, at a cost of $113.34. 



344 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOL-HOUSE INCIDENTALS ACCOUNT. 

At the high school the hall has been partitioned, so as to make 
two school-rooms on the north-easterly side ; the blackboards 
in the partition between the rooms being so arranged that, by 
raising them, the two rooms may be used as one. Both of the 
rooms have been furnished, one with the furniture formerly used 
in the hall and the other with new furniture. The platform in 
the hall has also been removed, and the space it occupied has 
been utilized for a class in industrial drawing. Two large 
closets, — one for books and the other for drawing utensils, — 
have also been provided. The rain-water conductors at this 
building are all placed in the hollow space in the walls, and 
frequently, during heavy rains, the water from them leaks into 
the school-rooms, causing considerable inconvenience and damage. 
They should be abandoned, and new conductors placed on the 
outside of the building. 

At the Luther V. Bell School, a new room, nineteen by forty- 
one feet in size, has been made in the basement, with separate 
clothes-rooms for the girls and boys. About one-half of the 
furniture in this room is new, and the remainder was taken from 
other buildings. 

The water-closets have been partitioned, and ventilated into a 
warm flue ; anda"Gurney" hot-water heater has been placed 
in the boys' closet, supplying heat for both. 

At the Prescott School, porticos have been built at the 
entrances to the school-house and water-closets. 

At the Edgerly School, the large brick tank under the water- 
closets has been removed, and two short-hopper tank closets have 
been provided for the teachers, and fifteen of the " Parsons " 
trough closets for the pupils. These trough closets are flushed 
automatically ; and the janitor, by regulating the supply of 
water, can cause them to flush whenever and as often as it is 
necessary. A slab urinal, with automatic flush, has been sub- 
stituted for the trough previously used, and the closets have 
been newly plumbed and thoroughly ventilated. 

At the Davis School, a furnace, formerly used at the Bell 
School, has been put in, to heat the hallways and one of the 
rooms on the first floor. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE OX PUBLIC PROPERTY. 345 

4 

In addition to these improvements more than one thousand 
dollars has been spent for concreting at the Bell, Highland, and 
Morse schools ; and sundry lesser improvements have been made, 
all as specified in the foregoing financial statement. 

Special attention has been given to repairs on the wooden 
school-houses, five of which have been painted outside. 

XEW SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Aside from the payment of two small bills, of the year 1887, 
on the new Bingham and Burns schools in Wards Three and 
Four, as previously stated, the only expenditure in 1888 for 
new school property was the sum of $4,903.50 for the 24,517.5 
square feet of land bought of the heirs of Joseph Clark, on Con- 
cord Square and Adrian Street. (See previous statement.) 

HIRED SCHOOL-ROOMS. 

The store at Xo. 280 Elm Street is still hired for school 
purposes ; and a small " kindergarten " room has been provided 
in it, in addition to the room used in 1887. 

Three rooms have been hired in the Prospect Hill district dur- 
ing the year ; one in Hill Building, at a rental of |25 per month, 
including steam-heating, from April 10th, exclusive of the long 
vacation ; another being the store, Xo. 188 Somerville Avenue, 
at a rental of $17 per month from Oct. 1st, and the third in 
Eberle Building, at a rental of $25 per month, with steam heat, 
from Dec. 15th. 

The furniture for the room in the Hill Building was taken 
from a room in the Prescott School, which had been supplied 
with "kindergarten" furniture; that at Xo. 188 Somerville 
Avenue is new " kindergarten," and that used in Eberle Build- 
ing came from a room in the Edgerly School that had been 
newly furnished. 

CITY HALL IMPROYEMEXTS. 

The improvement of the City Hall, commenced in 1885 by 
remodelling and refinishing the lower story, has been completed 
in the jDast year by removing the standing finish of the upper 



346 AN^NUAL REPORTS. 

story and substituting asli, to correspond with the finish on the 
lower floor, and by replastering, tinting and frescoing the upper 
story. 

The roof has also been re-slated, the water-closet on the second 
floor has been improved, and the furniture on the same floor has 
been refinished and re-upholstered. 

The cost of the work on the building amounted, as appears by 
the foregoing financial statement, to $2,953.95 ; the cost of 
renewing the furniture, which was $578.55, being ^^aid from 
JVIiscellaneous Account and included in the statement already 
given of City Hall expenses. 

New gas and electric combination fixtures have also been 
placed in the upper story, at a cost (included in the cost of fur- 
niture in the foregoing statement) of $110. 

The Somerville Electric Light Company has placed an incan- 
descent electric lighting system, with a storage battery, in the 
building ; the city to pay the company for supplying the new 
system the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and 
the charge for lighting not to exceed, for the same amount of 
light, the previous cost of gas. No bill has yet been presented. 

For the committee, 

ROBEET DUDDY, Cha%rma7i. 
^ GEO. I. VmCENT, Cleric. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Accepted and referred to the committee on printing, to be iDrinted in 
the annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. YINOENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Feb. 13, 1889. 
Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Feb. 13, 1889. 
To his Honor the Mayor and the City Council. 

Gextlemex — The number of permits granted for the erection 
of new, and alterations of old, buildings during the year was 461. 
Classified as follows : — 



Dwelling-houses 

Stores and tenements 

Churches . 

Alterations 

Stables 

Hotel 

Miscellaneous . 



365 
9 
1 

51 

20 

1 

14 



As the ordinance governing the construction of buildings is in 
the hands of the committee on ordinances for revision, I renew 
my recommendation of last year, namely, that shingle roofs be 
covered with asbestos, or other paint, so as to make them slow 
burning. Extensive fires are caused by buildings catching fire on 
the exterior ; and while the present ordinance provides for the 
safety of buildings from fire on the interior, no provision is made 
for preventing the spread of fire from one building to another on 
the exterior. I therefore hope that material used in covering 
roofs of buildings will receive consideration by the City Council. 



Respectfully, 



JAMES R, 



HOPKINS, 

Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF MILK, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Iisr Board of Aldermeis', Jan, 3, 1889. 

Keferred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual re- 
ports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEOEGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Commok Couk-cil, Jan. 3, 1889. 

Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. EOBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Dec. 31, 1888. 
To his Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Council. 

I beg leave to make this my fourth annual report as inspector 
of milk, vinegar, and oleomargarine. 

I have, during the year, issued two hundred and thirty-two 
licenses to sell milk, fifteen to sell oleomargarine, and registered 
thirty-three stores. I have collected and tested two hundred and 
sixty-nine samples of milk and ten samples of oleomargarine. 
I have served eight le</al and twenty-eight verbal notices. I am 
glad to state that in all cases, I have found a perfect willingness 
to correct the same by change of supply, and otherwise to im- 
prove the quality of milk. 

It is pleasant to report that the milk served to our citizens will 
compare favorably with that of any city in the State. I have 
tested for milkmen many samples of daii'ies as received by them 
from the country producers. By this means I have found that 
all the dishonesty in milk must not be attributed to the retail 
dealers. 

The State Inspectors might do good by examining milk as it 
leaves the farm, as in cases where j^oor milk is received from the 
producers the retailer has to stand the brunt of the law, the 
fact of possession being the conviction of the party. 

Hoping that this report may meet with your ajDjjroval, I am, 

Respectfully, 

THOMAS CUNXIXGHAM, 

Milk Inspector.^ City of Somerville, 

(P. S. — 1140 paid to City Treasurer.) 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 28, 1889. 

Eeferred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the annual re- 
ports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. YIN'CEN'T, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Feb. 28, 1889. 

Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Feb. 25, 1889. 
To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council of Somerville. 

I herewith submit my report, as City Solicitor, for the year 
ending Dec. 31, 1888. 

Aside from matters of litigation, numerous questions have 
been presented to me during the year by the different depart- 
ments and officers of the city for my consideration and opinion, 
which however I need not recapitulate, as the most of them ap- 
pear of record in the different departments of the city. 

I have attended the meetings of the Committee on Claims, at 
which many claims have been heard and passed ujDon. In most 
of the cases which were thus heard, the petitioners were given 
leave to withdraw, and as we have heard nothing from such 
cases since, it is not necessary that I should trouble you with a 
recital of them. 

The case of Susan McCauley vs. Somerville, before the 
Superior Court of Middlesex County, an action for personal in- 
juries on Somerville Avenue, Jan. 24, 1886, was settled for 
1150, which sum makes the total amount paid out by the city 
during the year on account of suits or matters in the solicitor's 
hands. 

The claim of William ]^. Homer and wife vs. Somerville and 
Medford was on account of personal injuries received by both of 
said parties by being thrown from their carriage on the draw of 
the bridge between Somerville and Medford on the night of April 
12, 1888, by reason of the iron bar for swinging off the draw 
having been carelessly left across the road by the draw tender. 
After full investigation and recommendation by the selectmen 
and solicitor of Medford, and also a full investigation by the 
Committee on Claims of this city and myself, it was deemed 



358 ai^jstual repokts. 

advisable to settle said case by payment of |1,200, wliicli was 
accordingly done, Medford paying |600 and Somerville |600 ; 
the final payment not being made until after the commence- 
ment of the present year. 

The following are the cases pending in the Courts to which 
the City of Somerville is a party: 

1. Mayor and Aldermen of Somerville vs. Fitchhurg Mail- 
road Company — Before County Commissioners of Middlesex 
County. Petition for grade crossing of railroad location at Sac- 
ramento street. 

2. Parker vs. Somerville — Before Supreme Judicial Court 
in Middlesex County. Bill in equity to restrain nuisance alleged 
to be caused by the city upon Mystic fiats by a sewer. 

8. JParker vs. Soinerville — Before County Commissioners of 
Middlesex County. Damages on account of land alleged to have 
been taken for a sewer by the city. 

4. Squire vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court in Middle- 
sex County. Damages for conversion of box drain. 

5. JBoston and Loio ell Railroad Company vs. Somerville — 
Before Superior Court in Middlesex County. Petition in regard 
to repairs and reconstruction of bridges across railroad location 
in Somerville, and assessment of expenses thereof. 

6. Shea vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court in Middlesex 
County. Action for personal injuries upon Russell Street, Oct. 
14, 1885. 

7. Joslin vs. Cole et al — Before Superior Court in Middle- 
sex County. Action for false arrest and imprisonment. 

8. Ivnoioles vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court in Mid- 
dlesex County. Damages on account of land alleged to have 
been taken for a sewer by the city. 

9. Wanamaker vs. Somerville — Before Su2:)erior Court in 
Middlesex County. Action for personal injuries upon Broadway, 
Feb. 6, 1887. 

10. Gr over vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court of Mid- 
dlesex County. Action for personal injuries upon Union Street. 

11. Baldwin vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court in Mid- 
dlesex County. Action for personal injuries upon Cross Street, 
Feb. 3, 1888. 



KEPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 359 

12. Philhrook et al vs. Soraermlle — Before U. S. Circuit 
Court. Action for damages for alleged violation of the Knibb's 
patent for a relief valve on steam fire engines. This action was 
commenced May 20, 1887, and similar actions were brought 
against other cities. Somerville and the other defendant cities put 
their cases in the hands of Livermore.and Fish, patent solicitors. 

At a hearing I^ov. 14, 1888, the Court decided for the de- 
fendant ; but plaintiffs will probably carry the case to the U. S. 
Supreme Court. 

All which is respectfulh^ submitted, 

SELWYX Z. BOWMAX, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Boaed of Aldermen, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Accepted and referred to the committee on printing, to be printed in the 
annual reports. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VmCEKT, Clerk. 



In CoMMOisr CotTNCiL, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Concurred in. 

CHAS. S. ROBEETSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the City Clerk, Feb. 2, 1889. 

To the Honorahle^ the Mayor and the City Council. 

Gextlemex, — The following is respectfully submitted as tiie 
eighteenth annual report of the City Clerk, and is for the year 
ending December 31, 1888. 

CASH. 

The receipts and payments have been as follows : 

Receipts. 



Balance from year 1887, being for dog licenses 

issued in December, 1887, 4 males at 82 00 

-r^ T ,. . ,. .„„„ ( 1,055 males at 2 00 

l^or ciosj licenses issued in 1888 i , ^^. „ , _ ^^ 

^ (136 females at 00 

recording mortgages, assignments, c^c. . 

marriage certificates . . 367 at $ 50 



licenses to collect junk . 36 

sixth class liquor licenses . 21 

auctioneers' licenses . . 8 

billiard and j^ool table licenses 5 

intelligence office licenses . 5 
recording, certifying, and posting 

notices of naturalization . 5 
furnishing copy of record . 



2 00 

1 00 

2 00 

2 00 
2 00 

50 



S8 00 

2,790 00 
308 50 
183 50 
72 00 
21 00 
16 00 
10 00 
10 00 

2 50 
25 



Total . 



^$3,421 75 



364 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Payments. 

To Josepli O. Haydeii, County Treasurer: — 

June 1, and Dec. 1 , — dog license fees 
(1,051 males at |2 00 
1 134 females at 5 00 $2,772 00 
less City Clerk's 

fees, 1,185 at 20 cents . . 237 00 



To Jolm F. Cole, City Treasurer, monthly : — 
Citj Clerk's fees for issuing dog 

licenses . . 1,195 at I 20 $239 00 

All receipts, exclusive of dog license 

fees, as above stated . . . 623 75 



Total . . . . 
BaLxVnce Jan. 1, 1889, — being fees for 
dog licenses issued in December 

f 8 males at |2 00 $16 00 
1 2 females at 5 00 10 00 
less City Clerk's fees paid to City 
Treasurer, 10 at 20 cents . 



$2,535 00 



862 75 



$3,397 75 



$26 00 




2 00 






$24 00 





Tbe statistics of the office are as follows : 

BIRTHS. 

Is'umber of birtbs in Somerville in 1888, registered 
Less than previous year .... 

Males 

Females ....... 

Born of American parents .... 

" foreign " 

" American father and foreign mother 

" foreign father and American mother 



Xumber of cases of twins 



423 

397 

326 

329 

93 

82 



830 

47 



830 



830 
4 



KEPORT OF CITY CLEEK. 



365 



MARRIAGES 

Xumber of intention certificates issued 
More than pre /ious year 
Marriao:es reoristered 
More than previous year 
Both j^arties American . 

" " foreign 
American groom and foreign bride 
Foreign groom and American bride 

First marriag;e of . 
Second " " . 

Third " " . . . 

Oldest groom aged .... 

" bride " . . . . 

Youngest groom .... 

" bride .... 

Youngest couple aged : — 
Groom ...... 

Bride 

DEATHS. 

Number of deaths in Somerville in 1888 

Less than previous year 

Males . . . 

Females .... 

Under 10 years of age . 
Between 10 and 20 years of age 



a 


20 ' 


' 30 


ii 


a 


30 ' 


' 40 


u 


a 


40 ' 


' 50 


a 


(.1 


50 ' 


' 60 


a 


a 


60 ' 


' 70 


u 


a 


70 ' 


' 80 


(( 


u 


80 ' 


' 90 


(( 


u 


90 ' 


' 100 


i( 



367 
23 

378 
19 



178 

100 

56 

44 

681 



378 couples 



2 



378 couples 
67 
60 
16 
16 

16 
16 



300 
301 

214 
26 
62 
41 

57 
64 
50 
60 
20 
7 



601 

20 



601 



601 



166 



AXNUxVL rvEPOllTS. 



Age of oldest person deceased 
Born in Somerville 

" " other j)laces in the United 
Of foreign birth ... 
Birthplace unknown . . 

Number of deaths in January 



(( (( 


u 


" February 


(( u 


a 


" March . 


U (( 


u 


" April . 


a (c 


C( 


" May 


a a 


a 


" June 


u a 


u 


" July . 


a a 


a 


" August 


u a 


a 


" September 


U (,i 


u 


" October 


a a 


u 


" [N'ovember 


u a 


it, 


" December 



601 



178 

States . .278 

142 

3 

66 
36 
61 
46 
43 
29 
56 
63 
63 
48 
44 
46 

601 

The causes of death may be found in the report of the Board 
of Health. 

VOTERS. 

Men's Lists. 



93 



Pkecixct. 


On revieed lists 

of Oct. 1, less 

deaths to Nov. 1. 


Added in 
October. 


Total 
Nov. 1. 


Voted 
Nov. 6. 


Ward 1, 


Precinct 1 


456 ■ 


166 


622 


570 


" 1, 


2 


470 


279 


749 


699 


" 2, 


1 


610 


294 


904 


858 


" 2, 


2 


602 


237 


839 


782 


" 8, 


" 1 


470 


161 


631 


598 


" 3, 


" 2 


370 


170 


540 


510 


" 4, 


" 1 


315 


178 


493 


467 


'' 4, 


2 

Entire city . . . 


414 


165 


579 


534 




3,707 


1,650 


5,357 


5,018 



EETOET OF CITY CLERK. 



367 



Precixct. 



Ward 1, Precinct 1 



1, 
2, 
2, 
•^, 
3, 
4, 
4, 



Entire city 



On lots of ;Nov. i. 

less deaths to 

Dec. 1. 



621 
748 
903 
839 
631 
540 
491 
579 



5,352 



Added in 


Total 


Xovember. 


Dec. 1. 


4 


625 


11 


759 


4 


907 


6 


845 


5 


636 


5 


545 


6 


497 


6 


585 


47 


5,399 



Toted 
Dec. 4. 



376 



626 
618 
365 
313 
313 
423 

3,520 



Women's Lists. 



Precixct. 



Ward 1 , Precinct 1 



1, 

2, 
2, 

o 

3, 
4, 
4, 



Entire citv 



On revised lists 
of Xov. 9. 



28 



Add din i Total 
Xovember. Dec. 1. 



732 



1 


84 


85 


76 


2 


77 


79 


70 


3 


92 


95 


83 


13 


185 


198 


180 


3 


83 


86 


76 


1 


109 


110 


98 


5 


40 


45 


34 




62 


62 


60 



Voted 
Dec. 4. 



760 677 



Hon. Edward Glines has kindly furnished this office with two 
volumes of the Acts and Resolves (for the years 1871 and 1874), 
which could not be obtained at the office of the Secretary of 
State, and also with a co23y of the index to the public statutes 
and the public acts of 1882 to 1887, inclusive. 



GEORGE I. 



YIXCEXT, 

City Clerk, 



ORDINANCES 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Boaed of Mayoe a:st> Aldekmen, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Ordered: — That the Committee on Printing be, and is hereby, instructed 
to have printed, in the Annual Reports of 1888, all the Ordinances of the 
city that are not contained in the Municipal Register or the pamphlet sup- 
plementary thereto ; the expense to be charged to Printing and Stationery 
account. 



I]^ Boaed of Aldeemex, Feb. 13, 1889. 



Read twice and adopted. Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCEXT, Cleric. 



\is{ CoMMOif CoujTCiL, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Read twice and adopted in concurrence. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 
February 14, 1889. 

Approved, 

C. G. POPE, Mayor 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



OKDINAXCE Ko. 41. 

FAST DRIVING. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Somermlle^ as 
follows : — 

Section 1. — Whoever, having the care or use of a horse, or 
other beast of burthen, — carriage or draught, — rides, drives, 
or permits such horse, or other beast, to go at a greater rate of 
speed than ten miles an hour in a public street of this city, except 
in such streets, or parts of streets, and during such periods as 
may, from time to time, if deemed expedient, be designated by 
the City Council, shall be liable to a penalty of not less than 
five nor more than twenty dollars. [Passed Jan. 1, 1887.] 



ORDINAKCE Xo. 42. 

REPEAL OF ORDINANCE No. 36. 

£e it ordained by the City Council of the City of Somerville as 
follows : 

Section" 1.- — Ordinance Ko. 36, entitled " Compensation of 
Police Officers and Patrolmen," is hereby repealed ; to take 
effect from and after the first day of January, 1887. [Passed 
April 16, 1887.] 



372 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

ORDINANCE No. 5. 

FUNDED DEBT. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Somerville 
as follows : — 

Section 1. The existing sinking funds of the city, consisting 
wholly of its own bonds and any accumulation of interest thereon, 
shall be a23j)lied toward the payment of its existing funded debt, 
and the board of commissioners of the sinking funds shall forth- 
with thus apply all the existing sinking funds in their hands by 
delivering the same to the city treasurer, by whom all the notes, 
bonds, and scrip of the city, constituting said sinking fund or a 
part thereof, shall be cancelled, and by whom all moneys con- 
stituting a part of said sinking fund shall be applied toward the 
payment of the existing funded debt under the direction of the 
committee on finance, and the records of said board shall be 
delivered to and retained by the city clerk. 

Sec. 2. New notes, bonds, or scrip may be issued from time 
to time, as the oustanding notes, bonds, or scrip, which shall 
at the time of the aj)plication of the sinking funds provided for in 
the foregoing section constitute the remainder of the indebted- 
ness of the city, shall severally mature, for the purpose of pro- 
viding for the payment of the same, and said notes, bonds, or 
scrip, so issued as aforesaid, shall be payable at a time, not ex- 
ceeding twenty years from the date of said issue, and the city 
council shall provide for the payment of the said remainder of 
the said indebtedness, and of said notes, bonds, or scrip, issued 
as aforesaid therefor, in such annual proportionate sums as will 
extinguish such indebtedness within the time hereby author- 
ized. 

Sec. 3. The foregoing sections of this ordinance apply to the 
funded debt of the city, existing at the time of the passage of 
said ordinance, and any extensions or renewals thereof : the 
words " debt " or " debts " or " indebtedness," as hereinafter 
used in this ordinance, apply to and mean the debt, debts, or 
indebtedness, incurred by the city after the passage of this 
ordinance. 



ORDIXAIS^CES. 373 

Sec. 4. All debts, other than those incurred for temporary 
loans in anticipation of taxes, shall be payable within the follow- 
ing periods, namely : Debts incurred in supplying the inhabitants 
with water, and for constructing water- works, within not exceed- 
ing thirty years ; debts incurred in constructing sewers and 
drains, within not exceeding twenty years ; and all other debts, 
within not exceeding ten years. The interest on all debts shall 
be raised by taxation annually. 

Sec. 5. Instead of establishing a sinking fund for the pay- 
ment of the indebtedness of the city, the city council shall provide 
for the payment of such indebtedness in such annual proportion- 
ate payments as will extinguish the same within the time here- 
before prescribed, and the amount required thereby shall be 
assessed by the assessors of the city in each year thereafter, until 
the debt shall be extinguished, in the same manner as other taxes 
are assessed under the provisions of section 34, of chapter 11 of 
the Public Statutes. 

Sec. 6. The city treasurer annually in the month of January 
or February, shall certify to the committee on finance the 
amounts under this ordinance required to be raised by taxation 
during the current financial year, and to the board of assessors 
of taxes the amount required to be assessed under the provisions 
of the fifth section of this ordinance. 

Sec. 7. The notes, bonds, and scrip to be issued by the city 
in payment of any indebtedness, whether heretofore or hereafter 
incurred, shall be, so far as practicable, issued in such amounts 
and on such times as will enable the city to make the annual 
proportionate payments of such indebtedness by taking ujd and 
cancelling such proportionate part of said notes, bonds, and 
scrip. 

Sec. 8. dumber 5, of the city ordinances, entitled " Sinking 
Funds," is hereby repealed, and this ordinance is substituted in 
place thereof; but such repeal shall not affect any act done nor 
any rights acquired, or liabilities incurred under said repealed 
ordinance; and the said board of commissioners of the sinking 
funds shall continue to hold their ofiice until they shall have 
performed the duties imposed upon them by the j)rovisions of 
the first section of this ordinance. [Passed and approved Feb. 
28, 1888.] 



374 ANJyUAL EEPORTS. 

IS^o. 43. 

[Pub. Stat., Chap. 68, Section 1. Acts of 1883, Chap. 168.] 

AN ORDINANCE TO REGULATE THE SALE OF 

NEWSPAPERS. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Somermlle as 
follows : 

Sectio:n' 1. — ISTo liawker and pedler of newspapers shall 
expose for sale or sell newsjDapers within the limits of the city of 
Somer^Tlle, unless the Mayor and Aldermen have granted to him 
a license therefor. The Mayor and Aldermen may grant such 
license to any suitable person upon the terms and conditions as 
hereinafter in this ordinance prescribed, and a copy of this ordi- 
nance shall be inserted in the certificate of license. 

Sec. 2. — Xo license shall be granted to a minor, except upon 
the application of his parent, guardian, or next friend. 

Sec. 3. — Ko license shall be granted to a minor under the 
age of ten years, and every minor under the age of fifteen years 
so licensed shall annually attend, for at least twenty weeks, some 
public day school m the city or town in which he resides, or some 
other school approved by the school committee. 

Sec. 4. — Every person so licensed shall at all times, while 
engaged in the business for which he is thus licensed, wear con- 
spicuously in sight a badge of such form as shall be approved by 
the Chief of Police, with the word "Licensed" and the number 
of his license thereon. I^o person not so licensed shall wear such 
badge. 

Sec. 5. — Persons so licensed shall not congregate together, 
make any unnecessary noise, cry their newspapers in a loud 
voice, or in any other way disturb or annoy persons as they pass, 
or disturb the peace and comfort of the inhabitants. 

Sec. 6. — Every license, when not granted for a shorter 
period, shall extend to the close of the municij^al year. 

Sec. 7. — Every person so licensed shall exhibit his license to 
any officer of the city for inspection, when required so to do, and 
the same shall not be transferred, exchano-ed, borrowed, or lent, 



OEDIXAXCES. 375 

nor shall any licensed person employ or fiirnisli Tritli papers to 
sell, any unlicensed jDerson. 

Sec. 8. — Any yiolation of the laws of the State, or of any 
provisions of this ordinance or of any other of the ordinances of 
the city, shall operate as a forfeiture of this license. 

Sec. 9. — The Mayor and Aldermen may at any time, and for 
any cause which they shall deem sufficient, declare any license 
revoked, and the same shall thereupon be forfeited and void. 

Sec. 10. — Any person violating any of the provisions of this 
ordinance shall be punished by a fine, not exceeding ten dollars, 
for each offence. — [Passed Dec. 26, 1888, and approved Jan. 3, 
1889.] 



ORDIXAXCE Xo. 44. 

TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 4, ENTITLED 
'* FINANCE." 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Somerville 
as follows : — 

Sectiox 1. Section 4 of Ordinance Xo. 4, entitled " Fi- 
nance," is hereby amended by striking out the following words, 
namely : — 

" The chairman of the Committee oq Hio-hways, the chairman 
of the Committee on Sewers, and the president of the 'Water 
Board may, semi-monthly, and as much oftener as required by 
law, approve the labor pay-rolls of their respective departments, 
and the treasurer may pay the same in anticipation of the 
monthly action of said committees and board." 

And inserting the following in place thereof, namely : — 

" The pay-rolls of all employees required by law to be paid 
weekly, shall be made up to the end of each calendar week, and 
approved and sent by the chairmen of the committees and the 
president of the Water Board, in their respective departments, 
within forty-eight hours thereafter, to the City Auditor, who 
shall, if the pay-rolls are correct, approve and send the same 
within twenty-four hours of the receipt thereof by him to the 



376 ANNUAL EE POETS. 

chairman of the Committee on Accounts, who shall, if the pay- 
rolls are correct, forthwith approve the same. The Mayor, or 
in his absence, the president of the Board of Aldermen, shall, if 
satisfied of their correctness, sign a warrant for the City Treas- 
urer to pay the amounts thereof, and the Treasurer may there- 
upon pay the same." [Passed April 5th and 10th, and approved 
April 10th, 1889.] 



MEMORIAL TO CHARLES E. GILMAN, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Iis^ BoAKD OF Mayob AND Aldekmen, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Ordered : — That a Joint Special Committee, to consist of two aldermen 
and sucIl number of councilmen as may be joined, be appointed to prepare 
a suitable memorial of our late city clerk, Charles E. Grilman, and present 
the same to the Committee on Printing, to be printed with the annual re- 
ports of the year 1888 ; the expense to be charged to Printing and Stationery 
Account. 



Iis^ Board of Aldeemen, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Eead twice and adopted, and Aldermen Hemenway and Bradshaw ap- 
pointed to the committee on the part of this branch. Sent down for 
concurrence. 

GEOKGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Feb. 13, 1889. 

Eead twice and adopted in concurrence, and Councilmen Wentworth, 
Lyons and Sanborn appointed on the part of this branch. 

CHAS. S. KOBERTSON, Clerk. 

retiruary 14, 1889. 

Approved , 

C. G. POPE, 3Imjor. 



CHAELES ED^^AEDS GILMA^. 

BOEX 

IN SHREAYSBrEY, MASS., JAX. 1, 1809. 

DIED 



IN Bedfokd, Mass., Feb. 22, 1888. 



Charles Edwards Gilman, bora in Shrewsbury in 1809, came in 
1838 to that part of Charlestown which is now Somerville. On 
Walnut Street, than an old range way, he purchased a considerable 
tract of land, and there he made his home until some years later, 
w^hen, on the westerly side of Walnut Street, he built a new house. 
In this he lived until after the death of his wife and son in 1879 and 
1881. From that time he resided in Somerville and Bedford with 
his daughter. Dec. 3, 1841, a meeting of the inhabitants of that 
part of Charlestown lying west and north-west of the bridge over the 
Middlesex canal at CharlestoAvn Xeck, was held in the Prospect Hill 
School-house, at the junction of Medford Street and Russell's Lane, 
(Shawmut Street), to take measures for the setting off of that part of 
Charlestown named, as a separate town. At this meeting Mr. Gilman 
Avas chosen the first of a committee of ten to obtain the v names of 
those inhabitants favorable to a separation; and at a meeting of this 
committee on the same day he was made its chairman. 

Petitions for the setting off and incorporation of the Town of Somer- 
ville, prepared by this committee, were presented to the Legislature, 
and March 3, 1842, an act of incorporation, as prayed for, was obtained. 
The first warrant for a meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of 
Somerville was issued March 5, 1842, by Ephraim Buttrick, Esq., of 
East Cambridge to Charles Edwards Gilman, an inhabitant of said 

379 



ANISTUAL REPORTS. 

Town of Somerville, and in pursuance of this warrant, tlie inhabitants 
of the new town having been duly warned and notified, the first town 
meeting was called to order and the warrant read by Mr. Gilnian, 
March 14, 1842, in the Prospect Hill School-house. 

At this meeting Mr. Gilman was unanimously elected Town Clerk 
and annually reelected. He served in that capacity until the Town 
became the City. Under the act to establish the City of Somerville, 
approved April 14, 1871, the first City Council assembled for organi- 
zation Jan. 1st, 1872, and Mr. Gilman was elected City Clerk. This 
office he filled until his death on the 22 d of February, 1888. 

He presided, as usual, at the inauguration of the City Govern- 
ment Jan. 2,1888, and was at his desk during that afternoon, but for 
the last time. As he left the City Hall for the day he became ill and 
never returned to his work. 

At a special meeting of the City Council held Feb. 23d to take action 
on his death, the following resolutions were adopted: 

Whereas, the sad intelligence of the death of Charles E. Gilman, City Clerk 
of this municiijality, having been received, and the City Council in joint con- 
vention dnly assembled for tlie purpose of paying its last tribute of respect 
to his memory, therefore, 

Resolved, Tliat his unparalleled career of forty-six years of pu^olic service 
as tOAvn and city clerk was marked by a conscientious and energetic dis- 
charge of his official obligations, a courteous and affable bearing to his fellow- 
citizens, a genial, kind and generous impulse, and an honorable, unswerving 
integrity of character. He devoted his whole time to the faithful perform- 
ance of the duties incident to the office v^hich he so much loved, and it can 
trutlifully be said that he was permitted to round out a busy life with the 
full measure of its usefulness. His pleasant and happy disposition endeared 
him in the hearts of many friends, and he will be remembered with pleasant 
reflection-s by the large circle of our citizens who have been and are now 
interested in the administration of tov^n and city affairs - 

Resolved, That this tribute of sympathy and esteem be conveyed to the 
family and relatives of the deceased, and engrossed upon the records, and in 
further recognition of his departed 'worth the City Council attend the funeral 
in a body. 

It was voted also that the portrait of Mr. Gilman, in the Mayor and 
Aldermen's chamber, be draped in mourning for a period of thirty 
days in token of respect for his memory. 

The funeral services held at the First Methodist Episcopal Church, 
on Bow Street, Feb. 25th, were conducted by Eev. J. W. Hamilton, 
the pastor, and Rev. George W. Durell, chaplain of John Abbott 

380 



GILMAX MEAIOEIAL. 

Lodge F. and A. M. They were attended by the city government, 
boards and officers, by the three surviving ex-mayors, and by a large 
number of former town and city officials and past members of the city 
government, by John Abbott Lodge F. and A= M. of Somerville and 
delegations from Mj^stic Eoyal Arch Chapter of Medforcl and the 
Somerville Light Infantry. The following acted as pall-bearers : — 
Hon. Mark F. Burns, Mayor, Bernard W. Lawrence, President of 
the Board of Aldermen, George O. Proctor, President of the Common 
Council, and John F. Cole, City Treasurer, representing the city 
government and officers; Hon. Austin Belknap, chairman of the last 
board of selectmen; Joshua H. Davis, superintendent of schools; 
Aaron Sargent and Charles H. Guild representing the citizens; and. 
Charles S. Lincoln and Captain Thomas Cunningham representing 
John Abbott Lodge. 



2§t 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1889. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1889. 



MAYOR. 

CHARLES G. POPE. 

Residence, Summit Avenue ; office, City Hall. 



ALDERMEN. 
Chaeles L. Xoeth, President. 

WARD OXE. 

George D. WE:ir5rss .... Austin Street. 
Charles M. He:mexwat . . . Perkins Street. 

WARD TWO. 

Charles L. Xorth .... High Street. 
George A. Ki:^ball .... Prospect Hill Avenue. 

ward three. 
Robert Dtjddy ..... Bond Street. 
Ezra D. Souther .... Pembroke Street. 

WARD FOUR. 

Edward H. Bradshaw . . . Central Street. 
JoHX W. CoxvERSE . .' . . Broadwaj. 



CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 
George I. Yixcext. 



386 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 
Albert W. Edmands, President. 



Charles B. Sanborn 
Byron L. French . 
Clarence H. Willey 
Edwin A. Wilcox . 



WARD one. 



Austin Street. 
Florence Street. 
Flint Street. 
Glen Street. 



WARD TWO. 



Jeremiah J. Ly^ons 
Charles S. Butters 
Allen F. Carpenter 
L. Roger Wentworth 

Alyano T. Dickers on 
Charles B. Osgood 
William E. Pulsifer 
Frederick M. Kilmer 



ward three. 



WARD four. 



Albert W. Edmands 
Isaac R. Webber . 
William A. Hunnewell 
Frank E. Merrill . 



Washington Street. 
Churcti Street. 
Park Street. 
Yinal Avenue. 



Broadway. 
Gilman Street. 
School Street. 
Broadway. 

Summer Street. 
Wallace Street. 
Cedar Street. 
Fairmount Avenue. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Charles S. Robertson. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES FOR i88g. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Duddy, Kimball; Councilmen Lyons, 
Webber, Pulsifer. 

City Engineering. — Aldermen Bradsbaw, ISJ'orth ; Council- 
men French., Butters, Merrill. 

Claims. — -His Honor the Mayor; Alderman Hemenway ; the 
President of the Common Council ; Councilmen Kilmer, Wilcox. 



CITY GOVEEXMEXT AXD OFFICEES FOE 1889. 387 

FiXAXCE . — His Honor the Mayor ; Aldermen TVemyss, Kim- 
ball ; the President of the Common Council ; Councilmen TTilcox, 
Went worth, Pulsifer, Hunnewell. 

FiEE Depaetmext. — Aldermen Duddy, Converse ; Council- 
men Sanborn, Osgood, Merrill. 

Fuel axd Steeet Lights. — AldeiTuen Kimball, Hemen way ; 
Councilmen French, Xickerson, Webber. 

Highways. — AldeiTuen Bradshaw, Kimball ; Councilmen Wil- 
ley, Carpenter, Kilmer. 

Legislative Mattees. — His Honor the Mayor; Alderman 
Bradshaw; the President of the Common Council : Councilmen 
Went worth, Pulsifer. 

Oedixaxces. — Aldermen Souther, Hemenway ; Councilmen 
Lyons, Osgood, Willey. 

Peixtixg. — Aldermen Converse, Souther; Councilmen San- 
born, Carj>enter, Webber. 

Public Geouxds. — Aldermen Souther, Bradshaw; Council- 
men Xickerson, Butters, Willey. 

Public Peopeety. — Aldermen Wemyss, Xorth; Councilmen 
Nickerson, Hunnewell, Went worth. 

SoLDiEEs' Relief. — Aldermen Xorth, Duddy; Councilmen 
Lyons, Sanborn, Merrill. 

Watee. — Aldermen Hemenway, Converse; the President of 
the Common Council ; Councilmen French, Kilmer? 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 
STAXDIXG COMMITTEES. 

Electioxs. — Aldermen Wemyss, Converse. 

ExEOLLED Oedix'axces. — Aldermen Duddy, Wemyss. 

LicEXSES. — Aldermen Kimball, Bradshaw. 

Police. — His Honor the Mayor ; Aldermen Hemenway, 
Souther. 

Sewees. — Aldermen Xorth, Wemyss, Duddy. 

State Aid. — Aldermen Converse, Xoith, Hemenway, 
Souther. 

SPECIAL COM^nTTEE. 

BuTLDixG Pe EMITS. — Aldermen Bradshaw, Duddy. 



388 Al^NUAL EEPORTS. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Electio:ns and Return^s. — Councilmen Osgood, Carpenter, 
Willey. 

Ej^rolled ORDiis-AiiTCES AND Resolutioxs. — Councilmen 
Hunnewell, Butters, Wilcox. 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Charles G. Pope, Mayor, Cliairman, ex officio. 

Albert W. Edmands, President of tlie Common Council, 

ex officio. 

( Term, three years. ) 

ward one. 

S. Newton Cutler (elected 1888) . . Pearl Street. 
Horace C. White, M.D. (elected 1886) . Perkins Street. 
Horace P. Hemenway, M. D. (elected 1887), Perkins Street. 

ward two. 

Alphonso H. Carvill, M.D. (elected 1888), Bow Street. 
James F. Beard (elected 1886) . . . Prospect Hill Av. 
Charles I. Shepard (elected 1887) . . Yinal Avenue. 

WARD three. 

Norman W. Bingham (elected 1888) . . Scliool Street. 
QuiNCT E. Dickerman (elected 1886) . Central Street. 
William P. Hill (elected 1887) . . . Sycamore Street. 

WARD FOUR. 

Horace P. Makechnie, M. D. (elected 1886), Elm Street. 
Martin W. Carr (elected 1887) . . Craigie Street. 
Addie B. Upham (elected 1888) . . Newbury Street. 

Clarence E. Meleney, Superintendent and Secretary. 



CITY GOTEEXME^'T AXD OFFICEES FOE 1889. 



389 



PRINCIPAL ASSESSORS. 
(Term, three years. ) 



Bek'jamix F. Thompson (elected 1887), Chair- 



man 



Geoege W. Hadley (elected 1888) 
HiEAM D. Smith (elected 1889) 



. Surmnit Avenue. 
. Perkins Street. 
. Cross Street. 



ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 
(Term, one year.) 

■WAED OXE. 



George AY. Baetlett 



. Mount Yemon Street. 



WARD TWO. 

David A. Saxboex .... Prospect Street. 

WARD three. 

Edgae T. Mayhew .... Temple Street. 

WARD FOUR. 

Samuel T. Richards .... Summer Street. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

(Term, Physician, three years; other memhers, two years.) 

J. Fraxk Wellixgtox (appointed 

1889), Chaii'man .... Yinal Avenue. 
Charles H. Ceaxe (appointed 1888) . Webster Street. 
Alvah B. Deaeboex, M. D. (ap- 
pointed 1889) .... Office, Police Building. 
Cleric^ William P. Mitchell, Office, Citv Hall. 
Inspector^ Caleb A. Page . Webster Avenue. 



390 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Charles G. Pope, May or ^ Chairman^ ex officio. 

Herbert E. Hill, (elected 1886 for 

four years) ..... Mt. Yernon Street. 
Edward B. West (elected 1888 for 

unexpired term) .... Prescott Street. 
Daniel C. Stillson (elected 1888 for 

unexpired term) . , . . Tennyson Street. 
Charles G. Brett (elected 1885 for 

four years) ..... Hall Street. 

Agent^ Charles C. Folsom, Office, Police Building, Bow Street 
Secretary^ Frank W.Kaan, Office, Police Building, Bow Street. 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS. 

George I. Yincent, Oity Cleric. 

(Term, three years.) 

Cromwell G. Powell (appointed 1888), Chairtnan. 
Otis M. Currier (appointed 1887). 
Samuel G. A. Twycross (appointed 1886). 



SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 

(Term, one year.) 
J. Orlin Hayden, President, . Hill Building, Union Square. 



Adna C. Winning 
Richard Dowd 
Walter C. Mentzer 
Samuel W. Holt 



Fremont Street. 
Charles Street. 
Cedar Street. 
Washington Street. 



ClerJc^ Frederick W. Stone. 

Superi7itendent of Water Works, ISTathaniel Dennett. 

Office, Prospect Street, corner Somerville Avenue. 



CITY GOYERXMEISTT AXD OFFICERS FOR 1889. 391 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

(Term, three years.) 

Charles S. Li:n"col:n" (elected 1888), Prest.^ Laurel Street. 
J. Hexry Flitner (elected 1889), Sec^y^ . Day Street, 
George A. Bruce (elected 1889) . . Highland Avenue. 
William E. Weld (elected 1887) . . Summer Street. 
James E. Whitaker (elected 1887) . . Sycamore Street. 
.Sanford Haxscom, M. D. (elected 1887) . Webster Street. 
Christopher E. Rymes (elected 1888) . Summer Street. 
Elijah C. Clark (elected 1889) . . Rusli Street. 
Charles H. Browist (elected 1889 for un- 
expired term) ..... Sycamore Street. 

Librarian^ Harriet A. Adams. 



CITY CLERK AND CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

George I. Vixcext. Office, City Hall. 



CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES, 
JoHX F. Cole. Office, City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 
Jairus Ma^^x. Office, City Hall. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Selwyx Z. Bowmax. Office, 23 Court Street, Boston. 



CITY AUDITOR. 

Douglas Frazar. Office, City- Hall. 



CITY ENGINEER. 
Horace L. Eatox. Office, City Hall. 



392 ANNUAL EE PORTS. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 
Feank G. Williams, Albion Street. Office, City Hall. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LIGHTS. 
Thomas R. Roulstone. Office, City Hall. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE 

LINES. 

James R. Hopkins, Summit Avenue. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 
Melville C. Pakkhukst. Office, Police Station, Bow Street. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
James R. Hopkins. Office, Engine House, Highland Avenue. 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 
James R. Hopkins, Summit Avenue. 



INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR. 
Thomas Cunningham, Oak Street. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 
Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D., Bow Street. 



CLERK OF ASSESSORS AND COMMITTEES. 
William P. Mitchell. Office, City Hall. 



ASSISTANT CLERK OF ASSESSORS AND COMMITTEES. 
Albert B. Fales. Office, City Hall. 



CITY GOVEKISrMElSrT AXD OFFICERS FOE 1889. 393 



CONSTABLES. 
Jairus Maj^i^. William D. Hatden. 

Robert R. Perry. * Samuel R. Dow. 

Charles C. Folsom. Joseph J. Giles. 

Edward McGarr. George Cullis. 

Christopher C. Cavaxagh. 



FIELD DRIVERS. 

Samuel R. Dow. Myrox H. Kixsley. 

Joh:n^ E. Fuller. " Charles S. Thrasher. 

Rhine AS W. Skixj^er. George W. Be ax. 

Fraxcis a. Perkins. Charles L. Ellis. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 
David A. Sanborn. Charles A. Pearson. 



POUND KEEPER. 
Charles A. Small. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 
Ammiel Colman, 34 Marshall Street. 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK. 

Samuel T. Littlefield. 



WEIGHERS OF COAL. 

John Craig. D. Warner Danforth. 

George K. Walcott. 



MEASURER OF GRAIN. 
John Craig. 



394 



AXNUAL EEPORTS. 



WEIGHER OF HAY AND STRAW. 
JoHx Ckaig. 



UNDERTAKERS. 
William A. Flaherty. Patrick H. Rafferty 

Edward H. Marsh. Thomas J. Barker. 

Alfred E. Mann. Patrick Rafferty. 

Horace D. Runey. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 
Melyille C. Parkhurst, Chief. 
Robert R. Perry, Captain. Samuel R. Dow, Sergeant. 



Edward McGarr, Sergeant. 
John E. Fuller. 
Albion L. Staples. 
JuDSON W. Oliver. 
George W. Bean. 
George L. Smith. 
Edward M. Carter. 
John F. Johnson.^ 
Eugene A. Carter. 
Edward E. Hamblen. 
James F. Foley. 
Charles L. Ellis. 
Charles E. Woodman. 
Arthur E. Keating. 



C. C. Cavanagh, Sergeant. 
Phineas W. Skinner. 
Samuel A,. Brown. 
John H afford. 
Ivan Laighton. 
Myron H. Kinsley. 
George A. Bodge. 
Dennis Kelly. 
George H. Carle ton. 
Hubert H. Miller. 
Francis A. Perkins. 
Charles S. Thrasher. 
William H. Johnson. 
John G. Knight. 



William J. Daykin. 

Melville C. Parkhurst, Lock-up Keeper. 



MEETINGS. 395 



MEETINGS. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 
Second and fourth Wednesday evenings of each month. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 
Thursday evenings following the second and fourth Wednesdays 

of each month. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
Last Monday evening of each month. 



INDEX. 









PAGE 


City Government and Officers for 1888 3 


" " " " " 1889 .... 






387 


Mayor's Inaugural Address 






17 


Meetings . . . 






13 


Memorial to late City Clerk Charles E. Gilman 






379 


Ordinances 






369 


Keport of the Board of Health ..... 






225 


" " Chief Engineer of Fire Department . 






315 


" City Clerk 






361 


" " " Engineer 






281 


" " " Physician 






245 


" Solicitor 






355 


" " " Treasurer and Collector of Taxes 






33. 


" " Committee on Fire Department 






309 


" " " " Fuel and Street Lights 






323 


" " Highways .... 






257 


" " " " Puhlic Property . 






331 


" " " " Sewers 






275 


" " Inspector of Buildings 






347 


" " Inspector of Milk and Vinegar 






351 


" " Overseers of the Poor 






213 


" " School Committee .... 






129 


" " Somerville Mystic Water Board 






197 


" " Superintendent of Schools 






144 


" Waterworks 






203 


" " Trustees of the Public Library . 






249 



f *